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So I am about to embark upon my next build adventure, Italeri's 1:72 Stirling Mk.IV, and As.51 Horsa Mk.I to recreate the glider tug and pay tribute to the role they played during D-Day. The first kit I'm using is the Stirling Mk.IV, the Short Sterling was the RAF's first heavy bomber to be used during World War Two. The Mk.IV was adapted as a glider tug and used to tow Horsa and Hamilcar gliders. 

DSC_2757

The box includes 5 excellently detailed sprues, as well as a clear sprue and Pe parts.

DSC_2758

 

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There are 4 different colour schemes, with accompanying decals. I am planning to go with the scheme of 299 Squadron which flew from RAF Keevil, and could have towed the Horsa I am planning to build.

DSC_2755

The second kit, the AS. 51 Horsa Mk.I in contrast is minimal in parts and appearance. The box contains 2 sprues (with very little detail, as you probably would expect on a glider) and a clear sprue.

DSC_2756

There is also a sprue of Paratroopers (although I am not planning on using them for this project). The colour scheme and decals are that of the Horsa used in Operation "Tonga" Pegasus bridge 1944. I am planning on building them in flight, with the Stirling towing the Horsa, for that I will be adding small stands, but apart from this adaptation they will be out of the box builds. It's going to be a long build but I'm very excited about the work ahead. 

 

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Interesting couple of subjects Michelle - I'll follow along if I may :)

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1 hour ago, CedB said:

Interesting couple of subjects Michelle - I'll follow along if I may :)

You are always welcome to join me on my adventures! 😀 

Thanks Michelle. 

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I'll take a seat and follow along if you don't mind?

 

  Roger

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I'll  sit on the back row if you don't mind, was thinking of doing the same pair but sat on the runway ready to set off.

 

Phil

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11 hours ago, Hamden said:

 

I'll take a seat and follow along if you don't mind?

 

  Roger

Hi Roger,

Happy to have you on board.... Let's hope it's not a turbulent trip!😉

Thanks Michelle. 

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11 hours ago, shatters said:

I'll  sit on the back row if you don't mind, was thinking of doing the same pair but sat on the runway ready to set off.

 

Phil

Hi Phil,

That sounds pretty cool, I will join your build when you start it if that's OK? Happy to have you on board.

Thanks,

Michelle. 

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I began the build yesterday (after washing the sprues), by giving the inside of both fuselage halves a coat of primer, along with the flooring, and internal panels. Once this was dry I got out the airbrush and set to work giving them a top coat of Humbrol 78. This proved a disaster, and after much head scratching and succumbing to paint fumes I  gave up! I don't like being beaten however, so later I went in for a second attempt, with better results. Partly due to a better mix of paint, and realising the paint was drying quickly on the needle.

DSC_2764

 

 

DSC_2765

Today I have been working on both cockpits, there is minimal detail in the Horsa cockpit, however some of them are minute (and liable to become the carpet monsters next victim....if you are not super careful!).

DSC_2766

 

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With all the pieces in place, I need to touch up several spots in the paintwork before fixing into the nose of the aircraft. 

DSC_2762

 

 

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I have also built the pilot and co-pilot seats for the Stirling, these offer more detail (including pe harnesses, which I am yet to add). I have painted the Base in cockpit green, backrest black (having done a little research),  and the frame in a medium grey. Once the paintwork Is dry I will add the pe harnesses. That's all for tonight folks!

 

 

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Nice work Michelle, those internals look really good :)

Spraying Humbrol? You are brave... acrylics or enamel? I don't have much experience spraying their enamel but the acrylics vary a lot and some have nasty, grainy pigments that will clog your airbrush and not produce a nice, smooth finish (although the Prof has had great results, unusually).

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Humbrol enamels aren't that difficult to spray, they're my preferred paint. Just make sure that they're mixed fully (use a flat stirrer), make sure that they're thinned enough, and put light coats on (I use General Purpose thinners from the local auto chain. Cheap and it  works).The only Humbrol acrylics that I've used are the 'free' ones in the starter sets... less said about them, the better. I just bin them straight up now. Not sure I'd bother with trying any other Humbrol acrylics. (Preferred acrylic paint is Gunze Sangyo- love that stuff.)

 

I'll follow along quietly, Michelle. Looks good so far.

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9 hours ago, CedB said:

Nice work Michelle, those internals look really good :)

Spraying Humbrol? You are brave... acrylics or enamel? I don't have much experience spraying their enamel but the acrylics vary a lot and some have nasty, grainy pigments that will clog your airbrush and not produce a nice, smooth finish (although the Prof has had great results, unusually).

Hi,

I am spraying using Humbrol acrylics (I also use Revell and actually prefer them!) and as you rightly say they vary incredibly, some need no thinner just flow improver and some are grainy, but I like a challenge. The fuselage interior went on well in the end, and I shall be keeping a better eye on the needle from now on. 

Thanks again, 

Michelle. 

 

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Although I was lucky enough to get these as a valentines gift.......

DSC_2769

Needless to say I shall be giving them a try asap!

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This looks interesting, I was always fascinated by the Stirling as a kid - as far as I am aware, no surviving examples of the real thing exist.

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Tonight I have devoted my time to the Stirling and it's cockpit and interior. Firstly I carefully super glued the pe harnesses into place (snapping an arm rest off in the process🙄).

DSC_2774

 

Leaving these to set, I applied the decal to the instrument panel using micro set and painted the pe panel black, and leaver arms black also.

DSC_2773

Once the black coat was dry I painted on some detailing, managing to find a surviving instrument panel on the net for reference. I then began work on the rest of the interior, painting the dividing panels, and radio/instrument panels as well as attaching the pe harnesses for the rear seats.

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Im quite pleased with my nights work, even though most of it won't be visible when the build is complete. Nighty night all.😴

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So you should be - lovely work :)

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A quick update on yesterday's progress, as I entered the intense miniature world of 1:72 cockpit construction.......magnifying 🔎 glass at the ready. 

DSC_2776

With the Horsa cockpit ready to go into the nose I added the recommended weight under the floor, secured the dividing wall and door in place before attaching the canopy.

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This slipped several times as i applied pressure to keep it in place, however it is now secure and awaiting a ltitle waterbased filler around the join.

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The Stirling cockpit was a master of miniature, as the pe leavers are miniscule (and I was praying tue carpet monster didn't claim any as I cut them from the sprue). That said, apart from needing a magnifying glass the cockpit fits nicely together and looks pretty cool.......well I think so anyway. More to come later.

 

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What an interesting aircraft just love the Stirling one of WW2 unsung heroes in my opinion.  I was very privileged to have known a Warrant Officer Pilot (Jim) RAFVR who flew these on the early bombing raids, SOE missions and in this glider tug role, he also flew Lysander and DC3 Dakota dropping 1st Airborne at Arnhem.

 

Warrant Officer James Samuel Mills 1830694 (Jim) was awarded the Dutch Flying in 1947 one of only 11 to the RAF see here https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/37849/page/226   he was awarded it for missions he flew into Holland with the SOE.  I also knew Jeff a paratrooper, he first joined what was called the commandos, which later split into the Parachute Regt, their connection being Jim flew the DC3 Jeff jumped out of over Arnhem.  He was wounded and ended up being left behind to defend the Hotel Hartenstein and capture.  They both ended up being in the same British Legion, which is how I come to known them sadly they have now passed away Jim reached his mid 90's died in 2010, Jeff mid 80's died in in 2011 I think.

 

I'm sorry for almost hijacking this thread (not my intention) but I feel the story is very related to your build and I never miss an opportunity to tell their story and this is just a brief outline of what they did.   They had some amazing stories, were real gents, like so many of these heroes of WW2 sadly missed.         . 

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Very nice work on the internals - that Stirling cockpit looks amazingly detailed, even better than the lovely Horsa :)

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This is an interesting and worthy project and one I've considered doing myself. I have a print of a painting by a friend of mine on the wall next to me in the study depicting Operation Market Garden which used the same aircraft. 

 

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Copyright D. Ellwood

Great work on the kits, especially the Stirling cockpit, will be watching this develop with interest. Keep up the good work.

 

Cheers, M.

 

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Always good to see a Stirling. So call me in for that. Italeri's Horsa should be also a nice kit. They were very good at that era, especially on the clear parts.

Nice work on the cockpit!

Cheers Benedikt

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Go easy on the interior green in the Horsa main fuselage. It only covered the floor and fuselage side up to seat rail level, the rest was unpainted apart from the odd spot of yellow indicating where to cut escape exits. Another point is to ignore the instructions about the two entrance doors, they didn't hinge down (they slid in, up and over) and they didn't have steps.

The Horsa can be made (with a bit of work) in to a respectable Mk 1 but don't even contemplate a Mk 2 unless prepared to scratch build a whole new nose.

I can supply details of the previously mentioned arrestor parachute installation if needed.

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5 hours ago, Kev The Modeller said:

What an interesting aircraft just love the Stirling one of WW2 unsung heroes in my opinion.  I was very privileged to have known a Warrant Officer Pilot (Jim) RAFVR who flew these on the early bombing raids, SOE missions and in this glider tug role, he also flew Lysander and DC3 Dakota dropping 1st Airborne at Arnhem.

 

Warrant Officer James Samuel Mills 1830694 (Jim) was awarded the Dutch Flying in 1947 one of only 11 to the RAF see here https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/37849/page/226   he was awarded it for missions he flew into Holland with the SOE.  I also knew Jeff a paratrooper, he first joined what was called the commandos, which later split into the Parachute Regt, their connection being Jim flew the DC3 Jeff jumped out of over Arnhem.  He was wounded and ended up being left behind to defend the Hotel Hartenstein and capture.  They both ended up being in the same British Legion, which is how I come to known them sadly they have now passed away Jim reached his mid 90's died in 2010, Jeff mid 80's died in in 2011 I think.

 

I'm sorry for almost hijacking this thread (not my intention) but I feel the story is very related to your build and I never miss an opportunity to tell their story and this is just a brief outline of what they did.   They had some amazing stories, were real gents, like so many of these heroes of WW2 sadly missed.         . 

No apologies needed, it is the history behind these aircraft and the valiant crews that flew in them that brings a build to life. Thank you for enhancing my journey. 

Many thanks, 

Michelle. 

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1 hour ago, Aeronut said:

Go easy on the interior green in the Horsa main fuselage. It only covered the floor and fuselage side up to seat rail level, the rest was unpainted apart from the odd spot of yellow indicating where to cut escape exits. Another point is to ignore the instructions about the two entrance doors, they didn't hinge down (they slid in, up and over) and they didn't have steps.

The Horsa can be made (with a bit of work) in to a respectable Mk 1 but don't even contemplate a Mk 2 unless prepared to scratch build a whole new nose.

I can supply details of the previously mentioned arrestor parachute installation if needed.

Thanks for the information, none of the inside will be visible really in the end, but I like to be as accurate as i can. So I've had a quick look on Google and found.......

Screenshot_20180217-165022.png

 

 

I will be mixing up some plywood shades of acrylics later. Thanks again,

Michelle. 

 

Edited by Shelliecool

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Some nice interior details going on here, looking forward to the next installment!

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