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Cheers Lars, I'm finding this whole build fascinating, it's way outside my usual field, but it's just such a charming model.....Pleasure to follow.  :coolio:

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Wow. That all. I can say. 

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Thanks again, Sarge, Kris & All,

 

I'm down to trickling out these short posts now because that's how this project is going now. It's almost summer in Alaska &, with so much daylight & such a short warm season, we tend to head outdoors & take on "other projects"...1:1 scale garden sheds & such, like the one on MY "Honey-do" list this year.

 

So the crew is beginning to shape up. The Medieval-looking crew figures from the old Lindberg Wappen Von Hamburg & La Flore kits are dressed in tunics & tights, with odd Sou'wester style hats... (hat already trimmed back to more of a knit cap here)...

 

Surprise_416

 

...so I shaved down the hems of their short "skirts" a bit & started building up trousers & shirt sleeves with acrylic artist's gesso. This took several passes over as many evenings, adding extra heavy blobs from the thickened stuff on the inside of the bottle cap to the backs of the ankles & knees, kneecaps & arms. The guys on white sprues are from Preiser figure sets, both N gauge & 1:144. The Preiser figures have so much smaller heads that I also built up the sides & backs of their heads to better match the Lindberg figures. The 6 deadeyes I'll mold are also here:

 

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Here are the 2 climbing poses derived from the first photo above. There's another, sitting, that hasn't gotten "the treatment" yet:

 

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Here's the rabble so far. The 2 figures in upper left were Preiser 1:144; the other white sprues indicate Preiser N gauge, which is called 1:160 on the box. Both seem convincing enough among the kit figures:

 

Surprise_419

 

Hoping to have more soon,

 

Cheers, -Lars

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On 12/03/2018 at 8:09 AM, lars_opland said:

Thanks Again, Will,

 

I had heard of that one but never saw a photo before. She looks like "a real fixer-upper"!

 

Cheers, -Lars

She's remarkably well preserved- and part of that significance is actually that roof- which in greater part is probably the same one that was erected over her decks immediately after her construction. Having had a look at it, it certainly mirrors a lot of the detail of construction you see in early 19th century Royal dockyard buildings in the UK. Still, she needs help- in the last 40 years or so she's hogged by about 2ft. Desperately needs a long-term preservation plan. 

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USS Constitution had gotten badly hogged too. There are articles on line about how they fixed that in dry dock, but the U. S. Navy is still much involved with that one. "Unicorn" needs a "sugar daddy", or a major seaport that wants a mascot...or something...

 

The old shipwrights would scoff at all this, of course, & recommend to "just drag 'er up on the hard, burn 'er, salvage the metal & build another". Modelers face similar (but much smaller) dilemmas every time one of us weighs a major conversion vs. a scratch build. If you HAD a fully staffed, fully supplied late 18th Century ship yard, the choice would be easy.

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Hi All,

 

A couple of small matters pushed forward over the past weeks, finishing the fore fighting top with a strip selected to nearly match the thickness of the one around the main top & cut to width...

 

Surprise_426

 

The liquid cement under the first strip was allowed to dry until the next evening, then the ends were sanded flush to the sides of the platform & a second piece was pre-bent for the forward corners. This was liquid solvent bonded & secured with small rubber bands to dry overnight. I fussed with alignment of the edges for a minute or 2 while the cement tacked up:

 

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There. A little fine sanding to clean up the edges & that's 2 different tops from the same part:

 

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I didn't want to attempt rigging the gun tackle at this scale with blocks & thread (especially considering the planned assembly sequence ahead...), so dug out the stretched sprue again & chose a couple heavy sticks of brown styrene. A hole was drilled near one end of one of them with my smallest bit & equally thin steel wire was bent near it's end, CA glued in the hole & clipped off thus. The same bit was used to drill holes in both sides of 10 carronade beds, just above the wheels:

 

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Using a strip of styrene to get the brown stick & wire to rest at about the right angle, a piece of thinner stretched sprue was liquid cemented to it at a right angle:

 

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Having determined that 15mm would be about the right length for these, I glued a second stick of styrene there after turning over the tiny dried assembly on a subsequent evening...

 

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...& on yet another evening, another bit of the thinner stretched sprue was cut to length & glued across, opposite the first one. Again, this was allowed to dry until the following evening when I beefed up the joins with tiny drops of CA. This stretched sprue applicator is one of my favorite disposable home made tools. These can be thin enough that they won't easily disturb tiny loose parts while the too-fast-acting CA is being applied:

 

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That'll do. I can even CA these in place like this, because they'll end up level across from gun to gun, level with the beds & close to the hull sides when the hull is closed up, without needing to be fastened to the interior. I figure I need 19 more tackles for the 10 guns that can be more-or-less easily seen in the waist area...& 24 slightly smaller ones for the fo'c'sle & quarterdeck batteries...

 

Surprise_435

 

Thanks again for looking in.

 

Cheers, -Lars

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Here's a little more progress on gun tackle, as of tonight. All of these heavy tapered brown sprues were off-cuts from plugging the kit's shroud holes, conveniently sized for the blocks. Dividing the job into "bite-sized" sections, 10 sticks were selected & drilled at one end for the 5 guns in the port side waist...

 

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...bent wires were added...

 

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...& on through the steps as for the first tackle assembly...

 

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Only the best & oldest fingernail clippers for snipping off the excess. There are many more "blocks" in these scraps:

 

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Getting the wire ends into the holes in the slide beds isn't the easiest task, but touching the joins with a little CA quickly finished the task & all outer ends are level with the slide beds:

 

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That's cutting it a bit closer than intended on the spread at the outer ends, but this will work:

 

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Cantilevered stretched-sprue gun training tackles. A little paint, & breeching lines through the rings on the cascabels, will see these five done:

 

Surprise_444

 

'Til next time,

Cheers, -Lars

 

 

Edited by lars_opland
spelling

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Thanks Will,

 

I figured the gangways won't hide these 5 guns on each side, but the 2 stacks of boats will leave only glimpses here & there. Still, glimpses of something will be better than glimpses of nothing.

That's my story & I'm stuck with it! I can also claim truthfully enough that rigging these 10 is needed practice for the 12 smaller pairs (24 tackles = 48 blocks + 48 "lines" + 24 bent wires) on the upper deck, which will be far more visible.

 

To be continued.

 

Cheers, -Lars

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Hello Lars,

 

I've just caught up on this amazing thread. Normally an aircraft and AFV modeller who now and then (twice in my lifetime) built plastic martime models. Oh, and in a cupboard I have a Talhoer wooden model of a Spanish Fishing vessel which was started some years ago and keeps looking at me sadly to be finished .......! I am amazed at the quality and finesse achievable in a plastic ship model and this thread has changed my outlook on such things!

 

I will look on now with much interest indeed. Superb modelling.

 

Cheers

 

Terry

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Thank You very much, Terry & Stuart!

 

We of a certain age recall when most articles in any modelling magazine, on any genre, included lots of scratch-built detailing, much of it in stretched sprue & sheet plastic, in olden times before photo-etch was "a thing".

 

Terry, if you're a 1954, so am I!

 

Surprise_445

 

Cheers, -Lars

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Fantastic progress - I have the "Jolly Roger" kiddie boxing in my stash (caused some sneers, jeers & giggles when it was delivered at my OFFICE ADDRESS by accident) but have so many things going on that it is still safely in my stash. And I'm super happy to say that the "Like" functionality is working perfectly fine again for me (and other things, at one stage even Previous Page / Next Page also stopped working in both Firefox and Chrome).

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On 5/26/2018 at 5:24 PM, lars_opland said:

Terry, if you're a 1954, so am I!

aha, snap!

 

Just catching up here on your amazing work again!

 

Terry

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