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ModellerCH

Is Dremel any good?

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Hi all,

 

i'm looking for an electric multirole rotary for sanding, cutting and so on. I know that Dremel has many models but i know anything about rotary tools. Is there someone that can give me and advice? I'm in Europe region.

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I like Dremels, but I have had an issue with my more recent wired one, whereby it suddenly stopped working, after only a couple of hours of use over around 2 years.  Turned out it's quite common for a wire to come loose in the coil where it joins the connector, as the wire's under tension over a sharp edge.  I managed to unwind a loop and re-clip it on mine getting it working again, but it strikes me that in this day & age this sort of thing is an engineered-in weakness, but isn't everyone doing that now?  Everything is built to fail once it's out of the guarantee period, and repair is too expensive, so we chuck it away, buy more and through no fault of our own contribute to the wasted energy. :yes: thanks manufacturers :poop:

 

All that said, the spares are easily available for Dremel, and they're likely no worse than any other for making things that break. :shrug: Do you pay more for Dremel to obtain access to spares, or go generic?  I had a generic one that was still working when I gave it away, although the bearing was getting noisier.  If you're considering a Li-Ion one, consider what you'll need it for.  Cutting anything tough like steel and tiles will be a PITA with a cordless tool, as it just can't supply enough power when compared to the wired ones, while the cordless ones are able to go very slow, which is why I have one of each ;).  Horses for courses :)

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I've had my Dremel for probably 20 years now. I have a separate variable speed control unit and a flexible extension shaft to make it easier to work with. I have used it for everything from fine grinding styrene to reaming rivets out sheet metal. Still works great.

 

 

 

Chris

 

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3 minutes ago, dogsbody said:

I've had my Dremel for probably 20 years now. I have a separate variable speed control unit and a flexible extension shaft to make it easier to work with. I have used it for everything from fine grinding styrene to reaming rivets out sheet metal. Still works great.

 

What's the lowest speed you can get to with this, Chris?

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Barely moving. Just a few rpms. Of course, you can't really do anything with at that slow a speed.

 

Here is my setup. I sometimes mount the end of the flex shaft in the vice, so I can hold something in both hands.

 

Dremel

 

 

Chris

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I've had a Dremel for about 20 years as well. It is a variable speed unit, from 5000rpm to 30,000rpm. I've used it to replace a kitchen faucet to sharpening the lawn mower's blade to cutting through the rusted frozen nuts on my toilet so that the closet seal could be replaced. With the last, the space was very confined; it was difficult to hold and it hit the side. The shaft was knocked a bit off the perpendicular(I could see the wobble as it was spinning); I was able to finish the job. I contacted the company(their headquarters and factory are in Racine, Wisconsin; just a few miles from me); and, told them the problem. They wrote(yes, I wrote an actual letter, paper, envelope, and stamp) back and instructed me to send my tool to the Racine, Wis. address. They fixed it and returned it about a week later. It was no longer under warranty when I mailed it to them. The only cost to me was the postage; Dremel did not charge me for the repair. This was about '05-'06. It has worked fine for me since then, in a variety of other jobs. It is a wired one similar to (but, a different model) the one shown in Chris' setup above.

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I have just the motor tool part of that, bought mine little over ten to fifteen years ago. Beat the hell out of it and it keeps going. It seems like the Cat of tools, vibrates like crazy, chucks not the greatest, have to re torque it for some tools. I've seen better ones, but keep this one going. Beats hand sanding, just wear some eye protection. Your variable seed unit is a plus.

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20 hours ago, dogsbody said:

Barely moving. Just a few rpms. Of course, you can't really do anything with at that slow a speed.

Many thanks, Chris. I want to bring the speed down to the point where the tool doesn't melt styrene, so this seems like a good way to get below the 5,000 rpm lower limit.

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ModellerCH, it comes down to what works well with you. No right or wrong, just what is the best tool for you. Mike had a bad experience with his; he found a fix for it. But, he shouldn't have had a break-down.  Incidentally, most, if not all, rotary tool accessories are designed to fit almost all brands. Dremel is the big guy; but, generic and other brands should work.

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Hi ModellerCH

 

I had the battery Dremel for about three years, not really often used. I loved it, then it broke down. Repair was far too expensive, so I decided to change to Proxxon. I never had to regret.

 

Check out this shop: http://www.suter-meggen.ch/zubehoer/proxxon/index.htm, he has more than fair prices (also for kits btw:-) 

I work with a Proxxon MM50 EF / 12 Volt (speed adjustable) and the NG2/E Trafo (also adjustable) with this you can use your tool on lower speeds for plastic and slightly higher speed for Resin.

 

From Proxxon you have a wide range of tools, nevertheless you can use the Dremel tools as well. I even use my Proxxon with drills >= 0.6 mm, I never destroyed one until now. 

What Puente54 mentioned, the tool has to fit you. In my opinion the price should be second priority, you know the saying 'the one who buys cheap, buys twice'. 

 

Maybe you go to a Coop Baucenter to compare, they have both brands, there you can compare which one meets your need, your hand and maybe your future add-on plans.

 

Hope i could help

 

Cheers Thomas

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I bought Dremel all those years ago because that was all that was available, here in this industrial town, way up here on the backside of beyond. There were a large assortment of various tools and tips to go with it. I bought this box set and have used it as storage ever since.

 

Drem

 

I did have another unit before the Dremel, a gift from my mother. It was awkward to hold and didn't have any speed control. It could burn through styrene in nothing flat. Some of the tools were useful and readily fit the Dremel unit.

 

Drem2

 

 

Chris

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On ‎02‎/‎02‎/‎2018 at 19:25, dogsbody said:

Barely moving. Just a few rpms. Of course, you can't really do anything with at that slow a speed.

 

Here is my setup. I sometimes mount the end of the flex shaft in the vice, so I can hold something in both hands.

 

Dremel

 

 

Chris

Those were engineered to last, wish I could find an older one as I think they will go forever.

 

Julien

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I have a Dremel; it's great, however it's far too fast for plastic as the lowest it will run is about 6000 rpm. I need some way of slowing it down.

 

I also have an old Wolworth's cheap and cheerful motor tool and that is perfect for modelling; 10000 rpm down to barely moving. However it's old and the bearings are starting to go.

 

Karl

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