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Mike finishes a model shocker!!!! FFVS J-22A 1:48


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It seems I've been running my own private KUTA build for some reason, with the J-22 that stalled during the summer, the (also Swedish) Tunnan, and my long-standing Tactical Pod Regult builds all seeing some action over Christmas and the New Year.  It's been nice doing some modelling again, but BOY have I gotten rusty! :unsure:

 

This is the excellent Planet Models 1:48 FFVS J-22A fighter, which most folks including me have probably never even heard of!  It kind of looks like a Swedish take on the Fw.190 after a fashion.

 

It's pretty much out of the box except for the gunsight, which was a bit simplified, and some struts to hold the canopy open.  painted with Lifecolor, Mr Color, a bit of Alclad (mostly primers), some of the new AMMO Bare Metal series, and whatever else I could lay my hands on, Ultimate Washes, the superb AKAN Flat varnish, and some old Mig filters too on occasion.  Thanks to @petr@SpecialHobby for the review sample, and to Sten from Flying Colours Aerodecals for the additional decals I needed.

 

Pictures... here they are:

 

ffvs_j-22a_1.jpg

 

ffvs_j-22a_2.jpg

 

ffvs_j-22a_3.jpg

 

ffvs_j-22a_4.jpg

 

ffvs_j-22a_5.jpg

 

ffvs_j-22a_6.jpg

 

ffvs_j-22a_7.jpg

 

Thanks for watching, and if you've enjoyed it, please remember to hit like and subscribe... oh hang on, that's YouTube :doh:

 

You can find the Work in Progress (WIP) thread here  if you're bored.

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Nice and different Mike, never heard of this 'plane. Looks great . What are those 3 white stencils fwd of the Flaps?

 

Well done !

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Great work.  Nice and clean. I especially like the underside.

 

 

Now it looks like I'm the only one who never finishes anything.  :blush:

 

 

Edited by Thud4444
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18 minutes ago, bzn20 said:

What are those 3 white stencils fwd of the Flaps?

 

Sorry - forgot about this.  I dunno ^_^  They're probably for height/distance reckoning, but that's just a guess.  Someone much brighter will be along shortly to provide a better/correct explanation :)

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Nice one Mike - that pitot looks very 'exposed' though - I'd have knocked it off before even getting to the photo stage :doh:

 

I'm surprised you get anything finished - with all those PM's from numpties :whistle: every five minutes ;)

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Hello mike,

Nicely done, Congratulations !

full resin kit, must try one some day !

I always enjoyed unusual subjects !

Sincerely.

Corsaircorp

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Beautifully executed surprise subject!

 

The FFVS J 22 was an indigenous Swedish stop-gap fighter project, born out of necessity when Sweden wasn't able to buy any current fighter types at the outset of WWII.

 

It was said that the J 22 was 'The World's Fastest Fighter', although with the small print caveat 'relative to engine power'. The 1050hp P&W twin wasp R-1830-SC3-G engine was in fact reverse engineered in Sweden from a DC-3 engine – not a mean feat in itself. Due to the scarcity of aluminium and also the requirement for dispersed manufacture of components, the plane is of steel tube and wooden construction. The landing gear is a piece of very complex engineering, but apparently worked well regardless:

 

ffvs+j+22+jaeger-schweden+(9).jpg.516114

 

The white markings on the flaps, AFAIR, are just for visual indication of flap angle in its very simplest form – perhaps the engineering team was exhausted after the landing gear…

 

Slick modelling, Mike!

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

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Nice recovery and a very sexy looking little bird!

 

Christian, exiled to africa

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It is a quite good looking little aeroplane and not one I had heard of before, so it is good to be informed by your build Mike!

You might not finish many, but you certainly do quality over quantity, the paintwork and weathering is beautifully done.

 

Cheers

 

John

 

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Thanks for all the kind comments fellas ^_^ I found a canopy opener handle on the PE fret as I was tidying away all the build debris, so I guess I'll fit that before I shove it in the cabinet.  I also think it could do with a few oil streaks coming from the gear/engine on the underside :hmmm:

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6 hours ago, Spitfire31 said:

Beautifully executed surprise subject!

 

The FFVS J 22 was an indigenous Swedish stop-gap fighter project, born out of necessity when Sweden wasn't able to buy any current fighter types at the outset of WWII.

 

It was said that the J 22 was 'The World's Fastest Fighter', although with the small print caveat 'relative to engine power'. The 1050hp P&W twin wasp R-1830-SC3-G engine was in fact reverse engineered in Sweden from a DC-3 engine – not a mean feat in itself. Due to the scarcity of aluminium and also the requirement for dispersed manufacture of components, the plane is of steel tube and wooden construction. The landing gear is a piece of very complex engineering, but apparently worked well regardless:

 

ffvs+j+22+jaeger-schweden+(9).jpg.516114

 

The white markings on the flaps, AFAIR, are just for visual indication of flap angle in its very simplest form – perhaps the engineering team was exhausted after the landing gear…

 

Slick modelling, Mike!

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

 

The undercarriage looks really simple to me?

 

It's just an A-frame with a drag brace. The "swept" hinge line of the A-frame means that it swings slightly inwards as it is pulled backwards to nestle neatly under the pilot's seat. As the fuselage structure is tubular the belly is non-structural and is a big convenient door. The retracting drag brace has a simple geometric lock to prevent collapse and needs to big rams or anything. The fuselage-end hinge of the drag brace need only be rotated to retract or extent the undercarriage which could be effected with a sprocket and chain like a bicycle (or indeed an F4F Wildcat).

 

It might be one of the most DIY-able retracting undercarriages I've seen. It would work well for home-built aircraft as it could be fabricated almost entirely for steel tubes without any need for bespoke castings etc. The only apparent downside is that it will give a sizeable aft-CofG shift when retracted compared to lowered.

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3 minutes ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

The undercarriage looks really simple to me?

 

It's just an A-frame with a drag brace. The "swept" hinge line of the A-frame means that it swings slightly inwards as it is pulled backwards to nestle neatly under the pilot's seat. As the fuselage structure is tubular the belly is non-structural and is a big convenient door. The retracting drag brace has a simple geometric lock to prevent collapse and needs to big rams or anything. The fuselage-end hinge of the drag brace need only be rotated to retract or extent the undercarriage which could be effected with a sprocket and chain like a bicycle (or indeed an F4F Wildcat).

 

It might be one of the most DIY-able retracting undercarriages I've seen. It would work well for home-built aircraft as it could be fabricated almost entirely for steel tubes without any need for bespoke castings etc. The only apparent downside is that it will give a sizeable aft-CofG shift when retracted compared to lowered.

Today I've confirmed a long and nagging suspicion that I am actually thick, as that all just sounds like words to me. :blink::dunce::crying:

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11 minutes ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

The issue is more likely that I am a total nerd :worry:

We'll take some of the blame back and say that it was just too early for my brain to function properly.  My comprehension of written text also isn't what it used to be :blink:

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2 minutes ago, Mike said:

We'll take some of the blame back and say that it was just too early for my brain to function properly.  My comprehension of written text also isn't what it used to be :blink:

Sometimes Mike, when I read back what I've written, I feel the same way :lol:

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