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Dave Fleming

Airfix 1/48 Meteor

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9 hours ago, Mikkel said:

I hope for a Metoer nf14 conversion soon! Please ally cat!

yes please!

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On 1/9/2018 at 11:33 PM, Selwyn said:

Anyone else pleased that airfix will release the Meatbox as a FR9 with a camera nose?

Yep, it is the only reason that I would buy this kit!

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From the Alley Cat homepage, updated on 11th January:

 

"The Meteor Mk4 and Spitfire PR4 conversions for the Airfix Meteor Mk8 and Spitfire Vb will be live in the next couple of weeks, as cast up and just awaiting the final instruction writing...."

 

I'm curious to see the approach they've taken for their conversion. Hopefully the NF's won't be far behind!

 

G

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A spitfire PR.IV? Cool. Thanks for mentioning that one @guillaume320

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Source: https://www.facebook.com/officialairfix/photos/a.80699376270.112940.65102591270/10155889836561271/?type=3&theater

 

Quote

Here's another new kit variant for 2018, shown here in a 3D CAD render - the 1:48 scale A09188 Gloster Meteor FR9, featuring newly tooled parts to produce the armed reconnaissance version of Britain’s first operational jet fighter. http://ow.ly/j70630hVrhv

 

26952157_10155889836561271_4490828717748

 

V.P.

Edited by Homebee

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On 13/12/2017 at 16:44, NAVY870 said:

I've signed the Hornby non disclosure agreement so if anyone was to show up (or not show up) and measure (or not measure) any aircraft that

I may (or may not) have a connection with at any museum I may (or may not have) an association with I will only ever be able to

stand around in very dark sunglasses and only use the words "I can neither confirm nor deny" B)

Hopefully more than just very dark glasses otherwise visitor numbers to Camden would really drop off.  

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14 hours ago, Greg B said:

Hopefully more than just very dark glasses otherwise visitor numbers to Camden would really drop off.  

Dont you some of your Air Force chums to go and play with? :P

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1 hour ago, NAVY870 said:

Dont you some of your Air Force chums to go and play with? :P

I'm good, though I do prefer playing with members of a military organisation.  

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3 hours ago, Greg B said:

I'm good, though I do prefer playing with members of a military organisation.  

Yup.

gA6UYAU.jpg

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Source: https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/news/workbench/display-typhoon-and-photo-meteors

 

Quote

Inquisitive Meteors

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

Exclusive Workbench reveal of the artwork to be used on the future release of the new Gloster Meteor FR.9 kit in 1/48th scale

One of the first new tooling announcements we were proud to bring Workbench readers in just the third edition of our Airfix blog was the stunning new Gloster Meteor F.8 in 1/48th scale and over the course of the following few months, were able to bring you regular development updates as the model progressed towards its eventual release. Occupying a unique position in the history of British aviation, the Meteor was clearly going to be a popular addition to the Airfix range, especially in this slightly larger scale, which really does lend itself to helping the modeller recreate the size and shape of these iconic aircraft. With the first releases from this new tooling arriving in 2016, the Meteor proved to be an instant success and has been a popular subject for modellers ever since, helping to promote renewed interest in Britain’s first operational jet powered fighter.

The latest Airfix range announcement in January, included details of the third release from the impressive Meteor tooling, which for the first time would include parts allowing the modeller to build the Meteor FR.9, a fighter reconnaissance variant of the aircraft. This is quite a significant development for the Meteor tooling and requires the inclusion of a new sprue frame, which features additional parts to allow the longer nose and internal camera housings to be incorporated. By way of the latest exclusive announcement for workbench readers, we are pleased to be showing you the fantastic artwork which will be adorning the box of this latest Meteor release, along with a first viewing of the additional photo-reconnaissance pieces included with the new kit, allowing this distinctive version of the Meteor to be modelled.

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

The new Meteor FR.9 kit will include an additional frame of parts

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

The relevant pages of the instruction booklet which show details of the new FR.9 parts

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

Although the Meteor was a first generation British jet design, it proved to be an incredibly stable and reliable aircraft, which is particularly impressive when considering this was all new technology at the time. Going on to enjoy a relatively long service career, there was plenty of development scope in the original Meteor design, which resulted in just under 4000 aircraft being produced between 1943 and 1955, with several versions seeing service with the Royal Air Force and a number of overseas air arms.  The art of aerial reconnaissance has been an essential military requirement since the early days of powered flight and relies on a number of significant factors – a stable photographic platform, speed and stealth. Possessing all these attributes, the Meteor was an ideal candidate to improve the reconnaissance capabilities of the RAF and the Gloster design team had several attempts at producing a suitable variant, before succeeding with the FR.9. Equipping the aircraft with a modified nose section which housed three remotely controlled Williamson F.24 cameras, each one took pictures through one of three window positions, allowing the pilot to obtain the best possible images of his intended target. Significantly, the aircraft retained the cannon armament of the F.8 variant of the Meteor and was able to switch from the reconnaissance to attack role at any time, also capable of defending itself from enemy attack should the need arise. Operated extensively from overseas RAF bases, the FR.9 was also equipped with additional fuel capacity in the form of external underwing and ventral fuel tanks, greatly increasing the range and loiter times over which these aircraft could operate. Let’s take a closer look at the interesting scheme options which will be included with this new kit.

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

Gloster Meteor FR.9, WL263/O, RAF No.208 Squadron, Salalah, Oman, December 1957

RAF No.208 Squadron has a long association with operating from bases in the Middle East and North Africa, a history which is commemorated by the adoption of a sphinx on the unit badge. Reformed at RAF Ismailia, Egypt in 1920, the Squadron would police this part of the world right up to the outbreak of the Second World War, when it was equipped with the Westland Lysander and later the Hawker Hurricane, which were both flown in Army Cooperation and reconnaissance roles. The dawning of the jet age brought the Gloster Meteor to No.208 Squadron and their Far Eastern bases, who operated the FR.9 reconnaissance variant for almost seven years during the 1950s.

Meteor FR.9 WL263 is presented here wearing the attractive colours of No.208 Squadron whilst operating in the photo reconnaissance role out of Salalah on the southern coast of Oman in 1957. With the base being located near to the Yemeni border, these aircraft were conveniently situated to perform high speed armed reconnaissance flights throughout this volatile region, hopefully identifying potentially dangerous situations before they became too much of a problem. The aircraft has adopted a scheme which features camouflaged upper surfaces, a very appealing PRU blue on the undersurfaces and a bright yellow nose, which appears to draw attention to the cameras mounted in the aircraft’s nose. This Meteor would end its days in this part of the world, having suffered damage in a landing incident in 1960 – classified as beyond economical repair, it was used as a spares ship to keep other RAF Meteors in the region flying. A really attractive scheme and one which will appeal to many modellers.

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

Gloster Meteor FR.9, WX978, RAF No.2 Squadron, Royal Air Force Germany, Gutersloh, Germany, May 1953

With its capability to undertake high speed armed reconnaissance operations, the Gloster Meteor FR.9 would see much of its service operating with Squadrons stationed away from the UK. As well as the Far and Middle East, the 2nd Tactical Air Force in Germany would make full use of the capabilities of the aircraft, receiving its first examples in December 1950. Flying in the colours of No.2 Squadron (and later No.79 Squadron), these aircraft would be regularly employed patrolling the West German border, photographing areas of particular interest and attempting to deter any Soviet incursion which may lead to potential conflict.

Once again adopting an attractive, if rather unusual colour scheme, Meteor WX978 would go on to end its flying career in Aden, where so many RAF photo reconnaissance Meteors would ply their trade. It was written off following an incident in January 1959, where it ran off the runway at RAF Khormaksar at speed – during its take-off run, the aircraft suffered a port main wheel tyre burst, which caused the Meteor to veer off the runway and bury itself into sand at the side of the runway. As was the case with the previous aircraft, the resourceful RAF engineers at the base would have ensured anything that could be used on another aircraft would have been removed from the wreckage prior to the Meteor either being scrapped or left to rot on a remote area of the airfield.

Airfix Gloster Meteor FR.9 A09188

The sight which will greet modellers when they visit their local model store to secure one of the new Gloster Meteor FR.9 kits

This latest release from the 1/48th scale Gloster Meteor tooling (A09188) presents a dramatically different version of the aircraft which will surely be of great interest to modellers, particularly in this Centenary year of the Royal Air Force. Both schemes included with the kit present really attractive versions of this classic British jet which are significantly different from the schemes offered with previously releases. Scheduled for a June release, we will not have to wait long before we can add this distinctive version of the Meteor to our summer build schedules.

 

V.P.

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That's awkward, I like both schemes!  This could mean my having to buy two kits.  Oh, Airfix, what are you trying to do to me? 

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Nice artwork but I wish Airfix would stop showing a panel line where the nacelle leading edge meets the rest of the nacelle. This was taped and puttied on the aircraft so does not show up like that.

 

@593jones go on, 2 kits, you know you want to :wicked: 

 

Julien

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Love that high-demarcation line scheme. Really pretty - the more PRU Blue, the better in my book. Wish the whole thing was 30% smaller though....!

 

Justin

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Looks like I’ll be shelling out for two too, and maybe a third if I can find a nice High Speed Silver example with colourful Squadron markings or someone does decals with 8 Squadron’s blood, sky and sand arrowhead markings (that’ll be four then.........).

 

Please can anyone confirm whether the darker camouflage colour on the 2 Squadron jet should be Dark Slate Grey (Humbrol 224 or equivalent)?  I can’t get at any of my references at this red-hot second.

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I'll be getting (at least) one of these, without a doubt. Hopefully someone will produce some decals - I like the 8 Sqn markings.

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Dark Sea Grey, which is grey. Not Dark Slate Grey, which is green.

 

3 hours ago, stever219 said:

Please can anyone confirm whether the darker camouflage colour on the 2 Squadron jet should be Dark Slate Grey (Humbrol 224 or equivalent)?  I can’t get at any of my references at this red-hot second.

 

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4 hours ago, stever219 said:

Please can anyone confirm whether the darker camouflage colour on the 2 Squadron jet should be Dark Slate Grey (Humbrol 224 or equivalent)?  I can’t get at any of my references at this red-hot second.

 

22 minutes ago, Work In Progress said:

Dark Sea Grey, which is grey. Not Dark Slate Grey, which is green.

 

 

Can't get to my references now either BUT, I think Steve is correct, the earlier scheme on the 2 Sqn jet should be MSG/Dark Slate Grey/PRU blue in line with the scheme worn by Canberras at that time.

 

The later scheme for the 208 Sqn jet should be DG/Dark Sea Grey/PRU Blue, these colours replacing the earlier scheme in about the mid-50's.

 

The Dark Slate Grey was indeed the green component of the earlier scheme.

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23 minutes ago, Work In Progress said:

Duh, I withdraw my comment. I was looking at the wrong aeroplane

We all have days like that!

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Posted (edited)

With the release of the Meteor F.8, F.8 Korean War and this soon to be released FR.9, how big are the possibilities of Airfix making a Meteor F Mk.4? I fancy building one of those in the Fuerza Aérea Argentina colours.

Edited by Sturmovik

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Sturmovik said:

With the release of the Meteor F.8, F.8 Korean War and this soon to be released FR.9, how big are the possibilities of Airfix making a Meteor F Mk.4? I fancy building one of those in the Fuerza Aérea Argentina colours.

 

Not sure about Airfix but AlleyCat are going to be producing a Mk4 conversion - does that help?

 

More detail here!

Edited by Wez

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9 hours ago, Wez said:

 

Not sure about Airfix but AlleyCat are going to be producing a Mk4 conversion - does that help?

 

More detail here!

Thanks for the link, but I´ll keep waiting for a mainstream release, I´m not confident enough to make a resin conversion yet.

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Posted (edited)
On 18/03/2018 at 1:33 PM, Wez said:

 

Can't get to my references now either BUT, I think Steve is correct, the earlier scheme on the 2 Sqn jet should be MSG/Dark Slate Grey/PRU blue in line with the scheme worn by Canberras at that time.

 

 

 

You can see how it looked in comparison here

 

2-squadron-meteor-mk-9-s-germany-1955_or

 

208 at one point appear to have had aircraft in all three schemes, although in this image the lighter ones my just be shadows on natural metal aircraft....

 

MeteorGall%20Al%20Thomas%201955-56%2011%

 

They definitely had the lighter scheme!

 

MeteorGall%20Al%20Thomas%201955-56%2010%

 

Edited by Dave Fleming

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Posted (edited)
On 18/03/2018 at 9:15 AM, stever219 said:

Looks like I’ll be shelling out for two too, and maybe a third if I can find a nice High Speed Silver example with colourful Squadron markings or someone does decals with 8 Squadron’s blood, sky and sand arrowhead markings (that’ll be four then.........).

 

 

208 probably had the most colourful HSS markings, especially the ones with the nose flash. You may be able to use the kit markings, but there were two styles of Squadron bars, most of the silver ones had the wider yellow stripe

Edited by Dave Fleming

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