Jump to content

Thinners for ModelMaster paints (for airbrushing) - my paints gone gloopy!


RidgeRunner
 Share

Recommended Posts

15 minutes ago, RidgeRunner said:

Thanks SR.

 

Mineral Spirit=White Spirit in the UK?

 

Martin

Yes. Per Wikipedia:

"White spirit (UK) or mineral spirits (US, Canada), also known as mineral turpentine (AU/NZ), turpentine substitute, petroleum spirits, solvent naphtha (petroleum), Varsol, Stoddard solvent, or, generically, 'paint thinner,' is a petroleum-derived clear liquid used as a common organic solvent in painting."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What vintage paints are we talking about here? How old is the Humbrol paint? How old is your bottle of thinners? Old Humbrol enamel is better with white spirit/lighter fluid. Initial Hornby era and new UK is better with Humbrol thinner in glass bottle. You can still use the new thinner for old paint for brushing, but it eventually breaks apart if left together. Did you mix paints before putting in the airbrush cup? Don't mix in the cup unless you are using a bottom feed airbrush (not the side cup attachments though, these operate the same as top/gravity; mix paint before putting in).

 

I don't know anything about model master enamel, only the MM acrylic. The enamels are too expensive to bother with in Aus.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I were you, I would either try to source the MM thinner, or give lighter fluid a go. Don't worry, it isn't any more flammable than white spirit, but it drys quicker, and leaves no residue. Without knowing the consistency of the MM enamels, I couldn't give you a ratio to mix it. Grab a plastic bottle or whatever, load her up and give it a shot. White spirit should be good for cleaner.

 

Just wondering, why are you trying to airbrush MM enamel? The new Humbrols, even the crap tins, spray just fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Sapperastro.

 

i bought the two MMs because I wanted FS28913 and FS28915. I normally use Humbrol 209' but thought the colour to be not red enough. Otherwise I would have stuck to Humbrol.

 

Martin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't assume all is well yet. I've used other thinners for MM and they sprayed fine, but once returned to storage, over time they turned to jelly. It won't be a problem long, thought, as they are discontinuing the MM military colors enamel range entirely, so you won't have to worry about it. All will be acrylics. I imagine the thinner will still be around however, as they are continuing the automotive enamels and they will need the thinner. Only reason I can think of is you can't sand acrylics to get the smooth finishes the car guys demand. 

 

I'm personally at a loss as MM military colors are my "go  to" paints. I hate acrylics, but may have to learn to love them. 

Edited by gamevender
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, gamevender said:

I've used other thinners for MM and they sprayed fine, but once returned to storage, over time they turned to jelly.

Well, there's your problem. Don't store thinned paint! Thin only what you need for each painting session. Use a pipette to transfer paint from the bottle to a separate container for thinning. Spray (or brush, if you are using the hairy stick) the thinned paint, and if any is left over, discard it. Do not return it to the original bottle!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Turned to jelly eh? I wonder where we have heard/seen that before...cough new Humbrol cough. I wonder how many of the other brand enamels have this issue. I have heard colour coats stored with its own thinner does not have this issue, but I am unsure about xtracolor, Revell, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, sapperastro said:

Turned to jelly eh? I wonder where we have heard/seen that before...cough new Humbrol cough. I wonder how many of the other brand enamels have this issue. I have heard colour coats stored with its own thinner does not have this issue, but I am unsure about xtracolor, Revell, etc.

This is just a guess, but I suspect the issue may have more to do with the chemical composition of the various thinners than anything else. Proprietary thinners, created for use with a particular brand of paint with a proprietary chemical composition, may themselves have unique additives such as retarders, hardeners, leveling agents, drying agents, etc., which make them easier to spray or brush and dry faster or without orange peel or brush marks, but which can cause a chemical reaction in stored paint over time. Hence the recommendation to thin only what you need for a painting session and NEVER pour thinned paint back in the original container with unused paint.

 

I've always used mineral spirits and/or lacquer thinner to thin enamels, primarily Humbrol. I've never had Humbrol congeal in the tin, as long as the tin is well sealed after use.

 

Trapped air in the container may play a role, too. Years ago there was line of paints for modelers sold in the US that seemed to congeal the minute the bottle was opened. Somebody sells/sold nitrogen in a spray can for use by modelers, to replace the air in the container immediately before closing it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 15 December 2017 at 2:55 PM, Space Ranger said:
On 15 December 2017 at 1:45 PM, gamevender said:

 

Well, there's your problem. Don't store thinned paint! T

 

Agreed. I mix as I go only.

 

Martin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gamevendor; At least you know the MM system, where the acrylics are actually pretty good. I have brushed and sprayed them with very good results, along with the Revell Aqua colors, and Tamiya/Gunze aqueous are not bad for spraying either (pain to brush though, these days anyway), so I could survive if/when the HnS Police finally break down the Enamel doors. Unfortunately, I think in Humbrol colours, and the acrylic in that range really needs some massive work to make it decent.

 

I hope Colour Coats isn't snuffed out with the rest if/when this happens.

 

Space Ranger; In that case, perhaps the artist odourless spirits would be ok to thin in the containers. I have always taken the paint out for brushing, but I am just starting to get some of the newer Humbrol tins drying out, and this is with meticulous cleaning and sealing of lids afterwards. If I don't add something to those tins soon, they will be cactus in a few months I would wager.

 

Something amusing; When I saw this happening with the tins, I emailed Humbrol and they said you can thin the tins with the Humbrol enamel thinners so long as the lid is sealed up again tight. I will probably do this to the tins that are drying out and see what happens, and make any further investments based on the result. I know I can put Tamiya enamel thinners in the paints without issue when they starting losing carrier, so as you say, it is either the paint or the thinner doing it.

 

 

Edited by sapperastro
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...