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TheRealMrEd

"World's Fastest Fireball" - The Ryan FR-4

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Hello all,

 

Have just been puttering away on various old projects; not certain whether many would make a good WIP. However, there is one (actually of many) items that have been worrying my feeble mind for a number of years, trying to decide how to go about modeling them, the Ryan FR-4 Fireball, which is essentially an up-engined and modified FR-1 Fireball.  These modifications were enough to make this version 100 mph faster than the original. I read somewhere on line that this aircraft held  the world's speed record for a brief time.

 

The visible modifications (or at least those of most concern to the modeler) consist of 1) removing the jet intakes from the leading edge of the wing 1) replacing said wing intakes with NACA intake ducts, and 3) lengthening the aircraft by some 4 inches. Judging from drawings and photos, the latter seems to consist of a longer tailpipe, so not too  bad to manage.

 

The best photo I could find of the FR-4 is this one, which shows the hardest areas of the needed mods:

 

2v2uL1TGdxfzdhW.jpg

 

Not very exciting in terms of markings, is it?  Note especially the raised lip around the NACA intakes; they are NOT flush with the outside of the aircraft! We shall attempt to duplicate them a little later on.

 

For now, we begin with the basic MPM FR-1 Fireball kit in 1/72 scale (The ONE TRUE SCALE for all you slackers out there!) It looks like this:

 

2v2uL1TFNxfzdhW.jpg

 

Note the nice brass PE -- probably the hardest part of the stock kit, other than a little flash here and there. BTW, don't even think of trying this mod with the Pegasus kit! It has so many problems that most wise men would probably bin it instead. I didn't, whence cometh the ire!

 

I began by marking a straight line across the wings, showing where the protruding intakes need to be removed, by my trusty razor saw:2v2uL1TNMxfzdhW.jpg

 

I then sawed off the offending bits, as well as the front part of the wing that was molded onto the fuselage:

 

2v2uL1TjdxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next the wheel wells were painted, and the leading edge of the wing was stuffed full of Milliput's finest, and the the wings were squeezed together, glued and clamped. The Milliput was then roughly shaped to a rough airfoil, pending more accurate sanding later. Those of you familiar with Milliput ill understand the need to get it shaped as well as possible before it hardens. It's not impossible to sand, but tough:

 

2v2uL1TM5xfzdhW.jpg

 

And sanded: 

 

2v2uL1SorxfzdhW.jpg

 

Also, be sure to clean any excess squeeze-out from the wheel wells!

 

2v2uL1SvMxfzdhW.jpg

 

Well, that's all for now. Just a bit to peak your interest, assuming you are crazy enough to follow along. By the way, if a "grognard" (a soldier of the "Old Guard of Napoleon) is a very avid wargamer, what are we as modelers?

 

Ed

 

 

 

Edited by TheRealMrEd
typo

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Hello again!

 

Time for part two of the" Fastest Fireball".

 

The next step involves the fuselage. I began by trimming off the old wing leading edge parts molded onto the fuselage. I removed the part from the area shown by the arrow:

 

2v2uL1SJ5xfzdhW.jpg

 

Next I temporarily glued the fuselage halves together with tiny application of hot liquid glue, in my case, Weldon #3. Trial fitting the wing to the temporarily-assembled fuselage reveals the next problem -- the gap area that has to be filled in. The arrow shows where the new wing leading edge will fall:

 

2v2uL1Se8xfzdhW.jpg

 

Here, a photo I forgot to include earlier, showing the Milliput wing filling, to replace the former leading edge/intakes that were cut away earlier:

 

2v2uL1ScWxfzdhW.jpg

 

Now, back to the fuse. I took some 40 or 50 thou sheet and cut off a couple of slightly oversize pieces. I then stuck them in hot water for a while, then curved them around a knife handle, to get them to curve a little, to match te fuselage curve. These were then glued into place:

 

2v2uL1SAqxfzdhW.jpg

 

One thing I forgot to take a picture of -- I reinforced the back side of each join with small pieces of the thinnest plastic card I could find (around 10 thou). These were glued in with liquid cement, and all was allowed to dry.

 

The next day, I fabricated a template from old Mattel vacuformer plastic (what else to do with bright green plastic?), approximating the size and shape of the intakes as shown in the real picture of the aircraft, from the start of this thread. You can use the mm scale on the ruler to judge the proper dimensions for yourself. Mine is about 14mm long. The shape is determined by your good Mk I eyeball -- or, you can scale the photo; your choice. Note that the curve on the top rear and bottom rear are slightly different. In this scale, I'm not certain that most people would notice (or care!):

 

2v2uL1SRWxfzdhW.jpg

 

Also shown is a roll of very thin R/C servo tape -- something a little stronger than regular two-sided tape. The sealer layer is removed from one side of the tape, the plastic template stuck down firmly, then the tape is trimmed with a sharp razor blade to fit perfectly. (I undercut the tape slightly, by tilting the blade inward, as I cut around the template. Then the back side of the tape cover was removed, and the whole assembly stuck to the model in it's correct location:

 

2v2uL1SiFxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next, the outline of the template was scribed onto the fuselage side, first with the pin point scriber, later later with the blade type. The latter is much sharper and cuts more cleanly, while the former provides a path for the blade

 

2v2uL1Sm5xfzdhW.jpg

 

A shot of the other side, showing the final scribing. Note that I wasn't worried about getting an exact shape at this point; final sanding of the cut-outs will remedy any problem. At a single point on each side, I scribed all the way through the plastic, leaving a slot large enough to insert a very tiny jeweler's saw blade, as you will see later:

 

2v2uL1ShnxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next is shown a picture with the jeweler's blade having been inserted through the scribed slot in the model and then re-attached:

 

2v2uL1SG5xfzdhW.jpg

 

The supreme virtues of the jeweler's saw are

1) it has a selection of blades that can be changed, including (shown here) a very fine-toothed and VERY thin blade. The blade is delicate, and will snap in two if abused. The good news is that the blades aren't

"ended"; that is, they can still be used after they snap, provided they have not become too short for your task.

 

2) the blade can be detached at either or both ends ("A") above. The drill is, you detach on end at "A", carefully thread the blade through the hole or slot in the model, and the re-attach the loose end. At this point, there will be too much "slack" in the blade, so you loosen thumbscrew "B", and push the saw frame and handle in opposite directions  until the blade is tight. (No need to overdo it, you don't have to play a song on it!). BTW, I bought my jeweler's saw on-line at Micro-Mark.

 

In any event, when done sawing out the first one, detach the blade at one end as above, and move to the second side of the fuselage.

 

When done, it should look something like this:

 

2v2uL1SdnxfzdhW.jpg

 

After a little sanding:

 

2v2uL1S5FxfzdhW.jpg

 

By the way, I managed to break off (and lose) the white filler piece on the side of the fuselage (shown above). I just cut a new one and moved on (and re-checked my glue-support "tabs" on the back side.

 

Well, that's it for now.

 

Later,

 

Ed

 

 

 

 

Edited by TheRealMrEd
typo

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Nice. A rarer version of an already rare aircraft. 

 

Interesting to see how you're doing the NACA intakes- those sort of things really scare me!

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Hi Killingholme,

 

Believe me, it's taken years to figure it out/work up the moxie to give this a try. Hopefully, it will all work out in the end...

 

BTW, if anyone else cares to try this in any scale, I have a really bad photo copy of the NACA study on these ducts, and some of the variations they tried on this aircraft. Unfortunately, it's in .PDF format, and I can't post it here. Free copy to anyone who wishes to PM me their e-mail for it.

 

Ed

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I’m reading Tim McLelland’s “Britain’s Cold War Fighters” at the momenr (v good); apparently the Air Staff tried to persuade EE that the Lightning would be better with NACA duct intakes on the side of the fuselage, somewhat like this.  Thank God English Electric told them to push off!

Edited by Ex-FAAWAFU

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Hello again,

 

Back for Round 3. Ex-FAAWAFU, you are correct. I don't think that any conventional jet aircraft has successfully used the NACA ducts as the primary intake for a jet engine. The XF-93 also failed, because the NACA duct wouldn't flow enough air ti the engine. However, the duct is frequently used for smaller, less demanding flow on many modern aircraft, and I suspect, may well have found a use on some of the newest hyper-sonic types... 

 

But, back to the present (past?). When last we met, I had just completed the cut-outs for the NACA ducts. The next thing is to add the back walls to the ducts, and then the sides on the intakes:

 

2v2uL1Sj5xfzdhW.jpg

 

As preparatory work, I took a half-round mini file and thinned (on a taper) the back edges of the duct, just to give a smoother entry for our miniature air. Next I cut rectangular pieces of 10 thou plastic card into the shapes shown, and will use the trimmings to  form the side walls of the duct. If you do this, I would recommend making the rectangles 18mm x 18mm, and cutting the finished pieces to the dimensions given. This will allow the cut-offs to be a bit wider, giving more material to shape the curvy "lips" to be shown later.

 

Next I attached the duct back plates to the fuselage, aligning them to the firewall mounting stub on the fuse half, as well as the nose gear opening, as shown below. At this time they are only glued at the front part of the plastic duct backing:

 

2v2uL1SzjxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next, because I couldn't find ANY photos showing what the inside of the duct looked like, I just temporarily secures a piece of standard MK I round toothpick into each duct rear, help in place by an alligator clip, to assure the more-or-less same shape on either side:

 

2v2uLFybhxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next is a close-up after gluing the edges of he duct backing plates, showing the a fore-mentioned firewall mounting lug ( "arrow") and the alignment at the nose wheel opening ("A"):

 

2v2uLFy1LxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next is the tricky part. Alas, I didn't have enough hands to work on the model and hold the camera, so I'll simply describe the process and hope that the pics I do have will suffice.

 

I began by taking one of the (first pic in THIS post) cutoff pieces, and glued the wide end of that to the inside of the duct, and flush against the back duct plate. The cutoff pieces will extend above the opening, to be trimmed later. I worked about 5mm at a time, using liquid glue. I put glue on the edge of the fuse cutout, and then held the plastic cutoff piece in place with the back edge of a #11 X-acto blade. As soon as the first part set up, I moved to the next section. I had to trim the narrow end with a small shear -- about 1.5mm to get it to fit. It took about a minute total to do each of the four pieces. Here is what they look like, when done:

 

2v2uLFypgxfzdhW.jpg

 

Note the little "lips" sticking up proud of the fuse sides. These will get sanded to shape, using a sanding stick:

 

2v2uLFycWxfzdhW.jpg

 

Here's what they look like after sanding. You'll have to look at photos to get the shape close; hence my warning to cut the pieces a little wider, giving you more material with which to work.

 

2v2uLFywGxfzdhW.jpg

 

Note that is the above photo I have already made a filet, using Perfect Plastic Putty, shaped with a wet finger to blend the lip into the fuselage, as per the real aircraft. I won't say mine is dead accurat, but by the time it's painted dark navy blue, you probably couldn't tell anyway!

 

In a perfect world, all I would have had to do was saw out the edges and back of the duct, leaving it attached to the fuse by it's skinny front end, then adding the edge pieces, glued to hold the duct to a nice, slope, and it would be done. It just so happens that on this model, everything that's hardest all coincide in one small area, ahead of the wing. We have the weakened wing, after cutting off the wing intakes. We have both the cockpit and the nose wheel well, all clamoring for the same space. THEN we STILL gotta fill the remaining hole between the fuse and wing, without desturbing our ducts, and AFTER the cockpit is installed! Truly an engineering nightmare...

 

In any event, when next we meet, we'll be moving right along.

 

Later,

 

Ed

 

 

 

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Hi Ed,

 

:popcorn: and :drink:duly ordered, so I'm going to settle in, if that is OK, for the long haul.

 

Your builds are always entertaining and elucidating in equal measures!

 

On-On,

 

Christian, exiled to africa

 

P.S. Did I vote for this one at some dim and distant time, (Ediacaran?) in the past? Or am I blameless this time. :wicked:;)

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Welcome aboard, Christian!

 

Since it's Halloween time, I figured something bizarre and scary would just fill the bill!

 

Ed

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That is a great start to an unusual type!

I'll follow along and watch this become another masterpiece if you don't mind?

 

  Roger 

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Thanks Roger and B-Bill, still plugging away.

 

One interesting historical footnote to the FR series of aircraft, is that the series was controlled from the Navy side by Adm John McCain II (or was it Jr.?) -- the father of today's Senator John McCain.

 

Ed

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1 hour ago, TheRealMrEd said:

Thanks Roger and B-Bill, still plugging away.

 

One interesting historical footnote to the FR series of aircraft, is that the series was controlled from the Navy side by Adm John McCain II (or was it Jr.?) -- the father of today's Senator John McCain.

 

Ed

It’s easy to get confused for us Brits, who tend not to keep repeating identical names as much as our US cousins.  The Senator is actually John S. McCain III.  USS John S. McCain, the Arleigh Burke class destroyer that had the embarrassing collision recently, is apparently named after BOTH his grandfather, Admiral John S. McCain (CO of USS Ranger, then carrier Admiral in WW2) AND his father Admiral John S. McCain Jr (CINCPAC late-60s/early-70s).  

 

Clearly a family of low achievers...

 

Lovely work on the NACA ducts.

Edited by Ex-FAAWAFU

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Hi all,

 

You may re right about the Brits and  repetative names -- unless of course, we consider Henry, Edward, Richard....^_^

 

But, I digress. Time to continue with the "World's Fastest Fireball".

 

The next items to consider are those need to be installed ere we close the fuselage for good. I began by considering the tailpipe, which, as near as I can tell needs to extend some four inches further than it's original length. I found a bendy plastic  straw of the correct diameter, and after painting the inside and outside of one end a burnt metallic color, I glued on the "whatchamacallit" ( -- exhaust diffuser?). The little roundy fan-looking item on the PE fret, shown below next to the original kit tailpipe:

 

2v2uLFyfnxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next I cleaned up and painted the engine -- gloss black cylinders, grey crankcase and bare metal push-rods. This was glued to the firewall (before checking the FIT of the firewall; which was a mistake). By not test fitting the firewall first, but instead gluing it into one side of the fuse, I had to file the excess width off the remaining exposed side, which in turn throws  the center of the motor a little off. I DID however, remember to drill out the hole in the center of the crankcase to fit the propeller. Also shown below is the new, completed extended tailpipe:

 

2v2uLFyAqxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next, I assembled enough of the cockpit to try a test fit. The arrow shows the little "nibs" on the back of the seat that I assumed were little "shelves" upon which to mount the rear cockpit panel. WRONG!

 

2v2uLFyBFxfzdhW.jpg

 

What I ended up doing was filing off the little bumps, and the gluing on the rear panel 9mm above the cockpit floor. Note -- the right side area which shows the rear alignment bumps on the fuse half, where the rear of the cockpit floor is supposed to line up:

 

2v2uLFytCxfzdhW.jpg

 

NOTE: If I were to build another MPM Fireball kit, I would leave this rear piece off, and then later, glue a piece of sprue to the little box on top, and the glue this part in later, cutting off and sanding down the sprue when done!

 

I believe that would make the whole process mush easier.

 

The next pictures shows the areas on the cockpit floorboard that I trimmed on each side at the front end to clear the new duct work:2v2uLFyYLxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next, the instrument panel. MPM gave me a nice plastic set of gauges printed on clear plastic sheet, which was to be cemented onto the white-painted instrument panel, and then covered by the PE instrument panel, after painting that flat black. Unfortunately, I lost the darn thing, but fortunately, before I had glued in the PE part. The next photo shows the PE fret, to which I glued a piece of white plastic, and then filled in the gauges with individually punched Mike Grant 1/72 decals, followed by a drop of clear varnish. It was a lot of work but turned out pretty good, although it still needs a little trimming and paint touch up on the edges:

 

2v2uW1215xfzdhW.jpg

 

Next shown is the right half of the model with new Interior green paint all round and a lead fishing sinker glued in a "L". I had also previously glued the tailpipe assembly into the fuse, but the glue failed between the straw and the PE diffuser, but the diffuser stayed in place, so I'll be able to glue the soda straw tailpipe in later.

 

2v2uW12wjxfzdhW.jpg

 

"A" is the reminder that next time, I'll glue this part AFTER the fuse halves are assembled. The little alligator clip is just used here to hold the wing/nose gear well assembly to the fuselage during test fitting, to assure that the gear bay will fit in under the cockpit floor and the duct work. Also shown (rather poorly) are the PE side consoles provided in the kit.

 

Next, a variety of clamps are shown holding the fuselage and wing assembly together will the fuse halves and wing assembly are finally glued together. Note that this was not done all at once, but a section at a time!

 

2v2uW12BzxfzdhW.jpg

 

The alligator clips shown above are to hold the upper wing inner edges in alignment with the wing "ridges", molded onto the fuselage halves. The things marked "P" are small pieces of thin plastic card to help fill tiny gaps.

 

At this point, I'll let everything dry for a day, then resume festivities!

 

TTFN,

 

Ed

 

 

 

 

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Hi Ed,

 

looking good!

 

Christian, exiled to africa

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The whole prop/jet hybrid series of aircraft are amazing, even though they were an evolutionary dead end killed off by the advancement in jet engine technology.

Lovely build of what looks like 1970s state of the art moulds.

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Stunning work as always with your builds!

 

  Roger 

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Thanks guys---

 

FWIW, I just found out recently the Special Hobby have binned the Azur and MPM lines, so I don't know whether these will ever be re-issued. Get 'em while you can!

 

Ed

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Hello, back again!

 

Next up is filling the opening left at the wing roots. To further strengthen this area, I felt that plastic sheet was the best choice. I started by laminating together 2 strips of thick (maybe 50 or 50 thou plastic card).   I then inserted on end of this part into the wing gap, and marked the airfoil, not particularly closely:

 

2v2uW127NxfzdhW.jpg

 

This was then roughly carved to shape, and glued into place with strong liquid glue (in my case, Weldon #3):

 

2v2uW12P8xfzdhW.jpg

 

The fit of the wing to the fuse is pretty good, requiring mostly shaping and filling the leading edge fillet:

 

2v2uW12DoxfzdhW.jpg

 

After some sanding, but before filling, here's how the leading edge now looks. This shot also shows the "lip" on the intake to good advantage:

 

2v2uW1242xfzdhW.jpg

 

We are working toward closing up everything, but allow me to digress for a moment, about something I ran across recently, and had a chance to try out whilst glue was a' dryin':The handiest little gadget for masking small-scale wheels:

 

2v2uWqYpGxfzdhW.jpg

 

Notice the perfect circles of masking tape; these are 6mm in diameter.  For a long time I have used the Fiskar's tool for this, but as you can see below, it's really more of a "beam" compass, rather than a true compass. That makes it useful for larger circles (two-handed), but more awkward for smaller ones.

 

2v2uWqYcnxfzdhW.jpg

 

This Flex-I-File one is easy to twirl with one hand, and does a very nice job: Shown below are the wheels after painting, and after a touch of dark wash to "pop" the detail:

 

2v2uWqYfFxfzdhW.jpg

 

One of the easiest wheel-masking jobs I've ever done. Unlike ready-made masks, you can adjust to radius of the cut by fractions of a millimeter for dead-on accuracy. I just had to mention it, because it's sooo cool!

 

Anyway, back to the matter on hand. Next comes the vacu-formed canopy. It has a particular step in the back end that needs to be duplicated. The molding line for this was not very clear as it was molded, so I took some Tamiya tape, and fiddled around until I got it looking about right. Then I scribed a line against the tape, and after removing the tape, I had a good line to which to trim. By the way, I still cut it a hair oversize and and then judiciously sanded it to fit precisely:

 

2v2uWqYAdxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next, the top of the "dash" and upper cockpit rear panel were painted flat black, and the cockpit sills painted dark navy blue. The canopy was then glued into place using watchmaker's cement (G-S), and then the whole thing was held in place with a bit of masking tape, until dry -- because a bit of downward pressure was needed to make the canopy fit correctly:

 

2v2uWqYByxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next, the cockpit area was given a coat of  Interior Green, so that color would appear as the "inside" color when done:

 

2v2uWqY65xfzdhW.jpg

 

Turning the model over, the wheel whells were given a coat of the same interior green. After that was dry, the wheel wells were masked by the simple expedient of using hobby foam. This comes in thin sheets, and if you cut o piece slightly oversize, you can shove it in place with a toothpick. It expands slight to fill the cavity, and is just the ticket for smaller,  shallow wheel wells:

 

2v2uWqYYrxfzdhW.jpg

 

After a coat of Alclad II Grey Primer, a few small areas were filled with Perfect Plastic Putty, smoothed with a wet finger. Doing it this way rarely requires sanding: Also, the horizontal stabilizers were glued on, and the wingtip lights were cut out, filled with pieces of clear spruce with the little "bulbs" drilled out and painted, and glued into place. They've been sanded to shape and polished, and the masked with Parafilm "M":

 

2v2uWqYRnxfzdhW.jpg

 

After a few more spritzes of primer and final smoothing, she'll be ready for her new coat of glossy dark navy blue paint.

 

And while everything is drying, I'll take a break and catch you later!

 

Ed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What a brilliant build log, it has made me smile. 

 

Just how you have the attention to detail bewilders me.

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Hi DevCon1,

 

I think it's just that for many of the aircraft I'm currently building, I have been plotting HOW to build them for a very long time!

 

Ed

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:D Fantastic!

 

Just what I needed this morning, a dose of proper modelling.

 

She is looking good and thanks for the tool-infomercial; one has been added to the wish list.

 

Interesting news about MPM, Azur and Special Hobby. Lets hope that SH take over the moulds as there are many interesting airframes within.

 

On-On

 

Christian, exiled to africa

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Hi all,

 

Not a lot of progress to show, as everything has been tied up in the paint shop. But, to get it there, I had to first mask off the rotary engine. For me, the best way to do this has always been to cut a disk of cardboard or thick paper, slightly larger than the cowl opening, and then cut a line out from the center to any point on the edge. This allows the formation of a cone, to slip inside, covering the motor. If you are lucky, the cone will expand to fit the cowling precisely, masking the engine without further aggravation. If you're NOT lucky, as I was here, a few bits of added foam were needed. Also, I had to re-fill the crack at the top of the cowling:

 

2v2uGBWLGxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next, a full coat of primer (in this case Alclad II grey), to prep for paint and a final check of all surfaces. This last part is, of course, pure poppycock, because as soon as you hit it with any dark, glossy color, or silver color, and the cracks and crevasses going clear back to the Ice Age miraculously appear. I swear, I could paint a sheet of plate glass and scratches would appear!

 

In any event, after the primer:

 

2v2uGBWgnxfzdhW.jpg

 

Next, while that's drying, a lookat the prop, all finished. This started out by cleaning up with a file, and a coat of Alclad II white primer, in the general area of the soon-to-be-yellow prop tips. As soon as the primer had dried, a coat of yellow was shot over pretty much everything in sight! When that had dried, the yellow tips were masked, and the black portion of the blades was shot, using glass black to save a step later.

 

When the black had dried, the entire black and yellow portion of the prop (including the prop cuffs) was masked, and the the hub and rest of the blades were painted glossy sea blue. When that had dried, I applied the decals, from a sheet of Authentic Decals"U.S. Propeller Markings" decals, using the usual methods. When THAT was dry, I masked off the shiny hub parts, and then shot Alclad II dead flat over the decals. I though that this aircraft was unusual, in that the prop hub, in the area of the feathering mechanism was painted, vs. natural metal. Some of the FR-1's that were working to to get into the war had it that way, but most others were like this one, whether FR-1's or FR-4's.

 

The finished product is shown below:

 

2v2uGq755xfzdhW.jpg

 

Maybe I should just make a career doing propellers?  (Actually, there would be some precedent for that, as my wife's grandfather made propellers during WW I!).

 

After painting the model glossy sea blue and waiting for that to dry, I added the star and bar decals from the kit. Actually, I tried to, and the first one promptly disintegrated! So, I put a couple of coats of decal film on the other stars and the rest of the sheet, and threw them into the spares box. I ended up using decals from the ancient Microcscale sheet #72-14, which were as good as day one.  The tiny "NAVY" decals on the rudder came from old Microscale sheet #72-20, the very smallest size on the sheet.  For the "FR-4" decals on the vertical stabilizer, I am awaiting a i/144 sheet of white letters and numbers from the Brit side of the pond, upon which arrival, I shall endeavor to arrange into a nearly-correct printing on the model. 

 

Anyway, after the decal so far installed had dried, I topped the whole shebang off with a coat of Pledge PMS or whatever it is now. After that had dried, I examined the model carefully and of course, found three tiny runs from my being in a hurry! (Notice that while you never have time to do it right, you have plenty of time to do it over...)

 

So, I sanded off the runs, burning through the paint, which I then re-applied. Here she is now, drying ans awaiting a (Please God!) final coat of Pledge MSF(?):

 

2v2uGq7NNxfzdhW.jpg

 

Anyway, I expect of couple of days drying time, etc., so probably the next post will be closer to the end of the week, than sooner.  If not yet bored to tears, please stick around. I hope to finish this one up before our Thanksgiving Holiday. We'll see.

 

Later,

 

Ed

 

 

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That is coming together now. Paint and markings really bring it to life!

 

  Roger

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