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Hey guys . 

Kinda as title really.  

I have a 600D cannon however I have no close up lens. I doubt I can afford a new cannon lens. However how do I know what would fit my camera? 

 

Photography terminology really ally escapes me so have no idea what to look for!!

 

help :-) 

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You need not have to buy a dedicated close-up lens for photos for the forums.

I use some screw on close-up lenses which screw onto the front of the lens.

They cost as little as £5 each, better ones are about £10 each.

I use a +1, +2, & +4 and a + 10 for special occasions

 

This was taken on an old Fuji 5000 with the lenses;

Avenger%2C%2002s.jpg

 

This was taken using just one

Finnish%20Hughes%20500C%2C%2003s-M.jpg

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yup, thems the things

 

You just need to stop your lens down well, to at least f/8, cos at wider apertures the edges of the photo can be a bit 'soft'

Better quality from the middle of the lens

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You may find the auto focus on your camera will struggle a bit when you have a close up lens fitted, so be prepared to focus manually.

 

The close up lens will dramatically reduce the depth of field (the extent of your subject that is in sharp focus).

Shooting at a smaller aperture - say f11 or f16 - will increase the depth of field but you'll need to add a fair amount of light to be able to do this. I wouldn't recommend going below f16 (eg f22 or f32) as you will then start to get other effects that will reduce sharpness.

Experiment and have fun!

 

Edited to add:

I've found an article on the Canon website that give a good overview of close-up lenses: http://www.eos-magazine.com/EOS Collection/shop/Resources/A383 Close focus (CU).pdf

Edited by bhouse
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to keep the language simple, when taking pictures, set the camera to Av and set the number (aperture) to the highest you have for your lens, probably 22. Then just focus and away you go

 

Use a tripod or or rest the camera on a cushion/beanbag in front of the subject. Set the 10sec shutter timer to avoid camera shake when you press the button

 

Andy

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9 hours ago, bhouse said:

I've found an article on the Canon website that give a good overview of close-up lenses: http://www.eos-magazine.com/EOS Collection/shop/Resources/A383 Close focus (CU).pdf

Cool just given this a quick read :-) so whilst a cheap option gear lenses will not give consumer rate images.... not my problem for website stuff so I'm happy! 

 

Also mentions breifly using exiting tubes. These are cheap too so I'll possibly try them in addition in the future. Thanks for your help both 

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Hi Steve,

I'd steer clear of extension tubes if I were you as you need to open up the aperture when using them and that will lose you a lot of depth of field. For the casual user they offer no advantages over the close-up lenses. I use them occasionally when I have a very high quality lens (several £k in price) that offers excellent quality but won't focus quite close enough , For that case, I wouldn't want to compromise the image quality by sticking a £10 auxilliary lens in front of my £6k lens. I'd use extension tubes and add more light.

For day-to-day use, I'd go for close-up lenses. They are inexpensive, don't lose you any light and are very easy to work with.

Be sure to show us your results!

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5 hours ago, Red Dot said:

to keep the language simple, when taking pictures, set the camera to Av and set the number (aperture) to the highest you have for your lens, probably 22. Then just focus and away you go

 

10 hours ago, bhouse said:

You may find the auto focus on your camera will struggle a bit when you have a close up lens fitted, so be prepared to focus manually.

Your camera might have a 'macro' selection - a picture of a flower - on the left command dial, most Cannon do.

Select that; your normal lens will focus closer than normal, plus it will cope with the close-up lenses; but it might lock the mirror up

Be prepared to move the camera fowards and backwards until the camera can find a range to focus within

 

In the above two examples I used the 'macro' setting at f/8 - the  minimum my camera can do, its equivalent to about f/11 or f/16 on a Canon

Lighting for the gunner was a 150w LED light very close to him. Camera was hand held

Lighting for the Hughes 500 was daylight thru a window 8 feet away with fill-in flash, it required a slow shutter speed of about 2 seconds, camera was on a tripod and the camera self-timer was used to eliminate any shake

 

PS; you can get a good solid refurbished Velbon triipod off ebay for under £22. Mine cost £16, and I got No.1 son a larger one for £21

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Mine does indeed have a flower selection so that's a handy tip :-) thanks

 

Tripod I've got :-) 

I've also got a speed flash with diffuser, plus a ring light (not flash version but permanent light source) so that I'm sure will come in handy. 

 

I might find myself getting a remote trigger anyways at some point as they are always handy when me n the mrs go away on holiday and want some scenic "selfies" (HORRIBLE word is selfie!!) 

 

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When you get the lenses, just start with a simple set up and experiment, adding bits, changing lights.

With a flash on top of the camera, when doing close-ups it makes a shadow of the lens in  front of the camera. With mine, at very close up I loose the bottom 1/3 of the picture

The ring-light would be better, especially if you can turn one side on or off. I use mine on its LED light only, using one side mostly. I only use it for real close ups.

 

Cover a couple of bits of card in wrinkled up kitchen foil; use them as reflectors on each side of your subject; it all helps

 

Extension tubes; real specialist items, really for people photographing ants and other insects everyday

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1 minute ago, Black Knight said:

Extension tubes; real specialist items, really for people photographing ants and other insects everyday

 

 

Ha ha ha I read that as yiu implying people are insects! 😂  There is no comma in front of "people" 

 

its been somlong long since I used my ringlight I'm not sure if it has side/side on/off. However nothing a simple cardboard cutout can't handle :-) 

 

i think my reflectors vamished but as you say tinfoil works. 

 

Im sure I've still got some black/green/white  fabric backdrops in the garage too :-) 

 

 

 

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