Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Recommended Posts

49 minutes ago, AndyRM101 said:

I think you've got the wrong end of the stick Badder. The glints that Will was referring to are the two lens flare reflections on the respective canopies in the first shot with the planet backdrop. They were added with a photoshop brush that gives a flare effect. The engine glow was also added in that shot.

The reflections in the strait model shots are entirely natural and come from the camera lights. The glazing was painted in a gloss dark blue, and the reflections do indeed vary from one shot to another depending on the angle of the models. There are no reflections painted on, either digitally or with real paint.

I agree that there's no need to fake effects on a model shot, and it's something I never do. The composite shots, like the first one, are a different matter, and are done for artistic reasons to show a model in a hypothetical 'real' environment.

 

Andy

You're completely right, I did get the wrong end of the stick!:blush:

 

First off, I thought the first photo was box art! I had no idea those were your models 'photo-edited'. So actually, in that case, the post-production jiggery-pokery IS justified and deserves a WOW!

Believing that it WAS box art, I assumed the editing had been done to all the following photos. I am therefore happy to hear that they were completely natural. Not that it mattered at al either wayl. My point was that I thought someone was saying those glints weren't as good as they could be.

 

Thank you for clarifying matters!

 

 

Rearguards

Badder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there are definitely different conventions to what's allowed in photo edits vs. documentary photos of models :) But all photos are fake in a way, they present a curated view of reality and you can change a lot by how you compose, light and develop them. E.g. when I take pictures of metallic models I quite often use a key light to get glints in the places I want them and stop the model looking flat. So they're not painted highlights, but they wouldn't be in the photo unless I arranged it so they were! Is that a dishonest practice, or just working to show the thing off as best as I can?

 

Just to explain the criticism I was making about the "hollow" (I don't have a better word) specular glints in Andy's edit, here's one of mine where I did the same thing:

 

33449161196_65f4cd169f_b.jpg

 

I added the little vertical "ting" to the cockpit in the middle of a real highlight, but it has a bright white core which I think reads better as a reflection off a shiny surface? OTOH my model isn't lit very well compared to the A-Wings, which are really nicely colour-matched into the background :) I can definitely learn to do that better from seeing Andy's work.

I'm always wary about criticising other people's work especially when it's so good and the criticism is nit-picky, but I think if we don't do that at all the forum becomes a less useful place. Constructive criticism is the lifeblood of creative communities, or something like that.
 

Cheers,

 

Will

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Will Vale said:

 

I think there are definitely different conventions to what's allowed in photo edits vs. documentary photos of models :) But all photos are fake in a way, they present a curated view of reality and you can change a lot by how you compose, light and develop them. E.g. when I take pictures of metallic models I quite often use a key light to get glints in the places I want them and stop the model looking flat. So they're not painted highlights, but they wouldn't be in the photo unless I arranged it so they were! Is that a dishonest practice, or just working to show the thing off as best as I can?

 

 

I didn't have a problem and still don't have a problem with anyone editing their photos to create effects and improve the look of their work. Again, I'd have thought your photo of the Cosmo Zero was actually professional box art, rather than a photo of a 'homemade' model. As with Andy's A-wings, the things look that good! So your photo-editing effects have succeeded in that they have shown your work in the 'best possible light'

Repeating what I said earlier, I thought that every one of Andy's photos had been edited to show 'glints', or glare on the canopies. I was surprised at that, but even more surprised at the criticism that they lacked a solid white 'core'. To me that was a bit OTT. But as pointed out, I got the wrong end of the stick.

 

Rearguards

Badder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I understood that, sorry if I came across as banging on about it. I was trying to better explain what my comment was about after Andy explained what it wasn't about :)

 

Unrelated to your post, I think the honesty of photos is a really interesting topic so I'm usually keen to talk about it, maybe too keen! Even with film photography the photo is a mix-up of the subject, light, camera, film, and darkroom technician, so it's never a purely documentary exercise.

W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the initial 'beauty' shots. I don't have the skills or time to do them

to my models, so they impress me every time. How you do it seems akin to magic!

The shots of the models without the trickery are also always impressive.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, you have painted and weathered the A-Wings perfectly! And by the way I also like you photographs very much, they look great, perfect light and coulours, as always!👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Lucasfilm should contact you and hire you for the next movies. Lovely idea, perfect execution as always.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They look fantastic! Better than my Jedi Starfighter, which I'm too ashamed to post :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Habu12 said:

Better than my Jedi Starfighter, which I'm too ashamed to post :P

 

Thanks. I built the Finemolds 1/72 Jedi Starfighter a while back, and I know how fiddly that was to mask and paint, which is why I've not bothered to pick up Bandai's box scale one. I'd be nice to see yours though.

 

Andy:cat:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These came out absolutely superb. You really have the knack for getting these tiny models to appear so much bigger than they really are. Did you use AMMO’s engine grime? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, R0ver said:

Did you use AMMO’s engine grime? 

Not on these ones. It's quite a heavy wash (a streaking wash, really) and I thought it would be a bit over-powering on something this size. I used a thinner pin wash (Ammo wash for Greman yellow) and a filter (AK NATO tanks). They've both got a brown shade, one a bit lighter than the other, and I thought they'd contrast with the cooler blue tones in the paint scheme.

 

37035783143_3e51c69a8f_b.jpg

 

Andy:cat:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/10/2017 at 8:56 AM, AndyRM101 said:

Not on these ones. It's quite a heavy wash (a streaking wash, really) and I thought it would be a bit over-powering on something this size. I used a thinner pin wash (Ammo wash for Greman yellow) and a filter (AK NATO tanks). They've both got a brown shade, one a bit lighter than the other, and I thought they'd contrast with the cooler blue tones in the paint scheme.

 

37035783143_3e51c69a8f_b.jpg

 

Andy:cat:

They really do compliment each other well. Excellent stuff. Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick question... How in the world do you paint such tiny scratches? Do you use a tiny brush or tooth pick or something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Vanoyen said:

Quick question... How in the world do you paint such tiny scratches? Do you use a tiny brush or tooth pick or something?

 

They were painted with a small brush, a 4/0 in this case

 

37812703791_448ea4ae01_b.jpg

 

Not that difficult as long as you keep the paint fairly thin

 

Andy:cat:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Andy,

 

Insider information on these beautiful A-Wings?  Maybe these are the paint schemes we'll see in the new movie?

 

They look great as usual!  Keep up the great work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome job, the weathering is superb, well done!

 

Rich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...