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harveyb258

Fiat 806gp full-scratchbuild 1:12

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Beautiful pictures ! In my opinion your model belongs into a museum if you don´t want to keep it . Great work !  Hannes

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20 hours ago, Hannes said:

belongs into a museum if you don´t want to keep it .

It is staying with me, dear Hannes. There would be no greater honour than having this on display in Turin, but I very much doubt it would happen.....especially after their "hostility" towards our quest for the truth!

Thank you for your kind words, matey!

 

@Pascal...Thank you, my friend. It's good to know you're still following. Am looking forward to seeing your progress, too...……...

 

Cheers, H

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Hi Harvey.   

 

Just had my latest look at your progress and yes, it does make me smile!    I just sit here and shake my head at your attention to detail.   You sure raise the bar for scratch builders!
 

By all means hang on to your model!   After spending (sometimes) years fettling a model to which, in my case anyway, I have an attachment there's just no way I'd part with it for the sake of a few dollars.   

 

Anyway, what a wonderful master class in model engineering.   Keep up the good work.

 

Frank

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Hello chaps.

 

A bit more progress for your perusal...

 

Front springs, as promised!

 

Firstly, forming the eyes-

 

43863531670_5c0391e116_h.jpg

 

A group shot (as on the rears, a pin is fed through the holes and soldered, holding everything solid)-

 

31809205748_34c73809f1_h.jpg

 

Finally, a coat of etch primer, one coat matt black (Hycote auto rattle cans), followed by a good rubbing with Ak steel powder and a soft cotton cloth (old t-shirt)-

 

31809206228_94a229e7e0_h.jpg

 

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So, my next step will be to get these fitted and front rails bolted up, along with a couple of slight chassis amendments (moving oil filter and replacing the 2 under-chassis crossbeams with some tube of greater section).

 

Thanks for watching.

 

Cheers, H

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Very convincing work as always , dear Harvey ! One thing puzzles me though : Why the double first  blade ? I cannot see something like that on our drawing .

All the best !   Hannes

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1 hour ago, Hannes said:

Why the double first  blade ? I cannot see something like that on our drawing .

 

I did it like that because 2 blades pass through the slip hanger on the blueprint, hence the double eye.

 

Cheers, H

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Hi, I've been watching this with great interest for a while now and just had to say that this is a real inspiration.

 

I absolutely love what you are doing and the very ingenious way in which you seem to tackle very difficult tasks.

 

Love the way you break down the most complex assemblies into much more manageable chunks.

 

I'll be keeping a close eye on this.

 

Brilliant!!!

 

Cheers,

Stu

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Hello all.

 

A bit more of an update for your perusal-

 

The steps mentioned in my last update have been completed and I must say that I was a bit nervous when bolting the front rails together as they were under a bit of tension, so they were slightly

springing outwards. This meant that, if any of my crossbeams were slightly out, the entire chassis could develop a fatal twist. It creaked and groaned a bit (as do I :lol:), but thankfully, everything has remained true and straight! PHEW!!!

 

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Well, that's all for now, folks!!

I hope you enjoy and thanks for watching.

 

Cheers, H

 

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Another important step ! It looks great . Congratulations for your persistence  .   Hannes 

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Thank you, dear Hannes.

 

10 hours ago, Hannes said:

Another important step !

 

Indeed, it is. Now that the front end is tied up, I can now (hopefully) make some serious progress.

 

Are you still working on yours???? It's been ages since your last update. Hope all is well.

 

Cheers, H

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Dear Harvey , it´s not all well as you can see if you look at Germany and it´s political situation  . ( Soros plans etc. ) I hope that my nerves will allow a proceeding with my model in the next time .

All the best , dear Harvey  !   Hannes

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Dear Harvey,

 

Every time i log on to you thread, i expect beauty but i am blown away each time again and again with your craftsmanship and eye for harmony and beauty.

 

How do you polish the metals if i may ?

at what temperature do you solder ?

do you brush the finished and polished metal with a clear coat to protect it ?

 

if these are secrets, i would understand and keep my utmost respect to you !

 

warm regards

Sam

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Thank you my friend. I'm chuffed to bits that you continue to enjoy my endeavours.

 

To answer your questions-

 

When polishing metals, I usually start off with 240grit aluminium paper from local hardware store (B&Q, Wickes etc). If it's getting painted, then that's as far as it will go.

Otherwise, it depends on how you want the model to be portrayed.

 

If I want a straight-from-factory, showroom/museum look, I go from the above 240 to an 800 sanding sponge, then finer and finer micromesh (in washing-up water, or oil) all the way up to 12 thou). Finally , give it a good rub with the bottom of your t-shirt and pour some Johnsons Klear over it. Just make sure that you lay the part on moist kitchen paper afterwards...it will wick away any excess klear and prevent the part being stuck in place. you will then have a lovely and shiny protected piece

 

For this build, I'm trying to replicate the car as it actually was during testing and the resultant "studio" shots....capturing ONE moment in time, if you will.

 

Therefore, a different approach has to be taken.....

the chassis legs are steel, which, as I have shown a while back are VERY prone to any sort of dampness/temperature change, so ,after cleaning up again, they got another blast with the 240 paper to remove the offending rust and gave them a couple of coats of Mr metal primer, followed by 2 coats of matt laquer.

 

As for the rest of the metalwork, I used 240, 800 and then brass brush. No need for any clear coat, or any weathering if you want an authentic look.  My tip-of-the-day....don't wear gloves... you're taking away 75% + of your senses and capability. Your own natural oils  mixed with metal dust that's created is the perfect weathering component for any metal parts 

 

For most soldering duties, I use a 0,5mm lead/tin solder, melting point approx. 200c. I mainly use a torch with this.

If I'm doing any small, sensitive bits, then I will use low melt(70c) solder with the soldering iron set at 100c.

 

Hope that helps, mate. Thank you for asking!

 

Cheers, H

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Dear Harvey,

 

Thank you so much for this detailed explanation.

 

This will now become the solid base i will use from now on when working on any metal model i shall build ( many i hope ).

Instead of clear am using Gauzy to protect the final polish. 

 

Thanks a million dear Harvey,

you are raising my game each time you post and now with the above, i am even more and forever in your debt. :worthy:

Cheers to you

Sam

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My pleasure dear Sam.

 

I know that I don't always give detailed explanations in my updates...It's mainly because It takes me forever to type my thoughts onto the page, not through any ignorance or unwillingness to share my tips or secrets:lol:

 

I'm more than happy to answer any questions.

 

Cheers, H

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Still very impressive, dear Harvey. I feel very humble with my partial scratchbuild on plastic when looking at your full one on metal!! :worthy:

And indeed, a new important step! 

 

All the best my friend

 

Olivier

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Harvey,

Due to circumstances I have been more absent from your thread than I wished. But catching-up a bit now has shown me what I've been missing.

 

Mere compliments are not adequate to reflect the quality and thoroughness of your work. You are clearly in the top rank of all builders on this forum.

 

This will be a wonderful accomplishment and life-time reward for your skills. Just superb work - and all without an 'instruction sheet'.  :)  :cheers:

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Good morning chaps.

 

A bit of an update is in order, methinks.

 

Hartford shock absorbers...Contrary to the blueprint, which shows a 3-blade/2 spacer arrangement, all our photos show 3 spacers, which means 4 blades. I'd been putting it off since I did the rears, due to the sheer volume of file-work needed.

 

So, we have 12 aluminium discs at 0,75mm thick. The only ali I had left was 1,5mm. 

My tip of the day: before you start to file metal ( especially softer metals like ali white-metal and solder), rub talc onto the blade. This will prevent the blade from getting clogged, thus saving you an hour of grumbling whilst scraping out the file blade with a sharp implement. Funny thing is, though, most of the time I only seem to remember about it when I'm sat there grumbling...:lol:

 

45856125852_b23aeff2c9_h.jpg

 

We have 16 blades from 0,3mm brass. I must say that the use of pin-vices was invaluable for this operation...modellers' best friend!

 

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Flanges added...

 

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… and with the addition of 3 brass plates, nickel star-spring and M1 hardware each, we get these:

 

45181640704_3d9f306a89_h.jpg

 

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To finish off, a couple of no-expense-spared arty shots:whistle:

 

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Whilst these are going through the painting process, I will make the adjustment levers, including the 2 for the rear, which I had forgotten about.

 

I hope you enjoy and thanks for watching.

 

Cheers, H

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Great progress , dear Harvey  ! Your spiders from Mars now have six feet ! My own progress stagnates at the moment because I´m busy to sell my space toys collection and my house in the coming months  as well because I intend to emigrate in the next two years . But I will continue with my model as soon as possible , that´s for sure .

Great work !   Hannes

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Beautiful. Complete works of art. However... as I found after I'd made aluminium friction plates for my Pocher Monza, the plates are actually wood - Maple was used in period, now they use Beech on the rebuilds. Of course if you're going to paint the whole assembly it doesn't matter, but wooden leaves would add another material to the build and look cool...

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