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Dunkirk movie Spitfire


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Have the Revell 1/32 Mk .IIa in the stash for a while and am now inspired to build Tom Hardy's Spitfire from the movie Dunkirk. From what I can see the serial number is R9612.

 

Having done a bit of digging around on t'aircraft with 'LC' belonged to the Station Flight at RAF Feltwell, and looking at Feltwells history this did not include Spitifes !

 

So to the questions:

 

1. Is the Spit in the film a Mk.I or Mk.II ?

2. Would adding the Barracuda Studios backdate for a Mk.I be needed ?

3. The LC looks grey to my eye not sky, but what size ? 36" ?

4. What size for the serial number R9612 ?

 

Anything else you can think of to make it look like the one in the movie even though it may not be historically accurate.

 

Many thanks

 

Paul

 

 

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Its a genunine restored Early MkI and you will need the Resin correction for Revells 1/32 MkII. The Aircraft Restoration Company's Supermarine Spitfire Mk1 N3200 is the actual aircraft.

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(Sorry for the slight hijack) I've just been to see this and I can't help but thinking there may be a big google search on for LC decals going on now..... :)

 

(Oh look, I have a mk i in the stash.....)

Edited by Lawzer
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If you'd rather spray the markings check out maketar masks. You can order RAF lettering and roundels in any size.

 

www.shop.maketar.com

 

 

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Whatever you do - do not fit a crowbar to the cockpit door (if you pose it open) - especially not a RED one !!

 

1. They were not fitted until after the BoB

2. The red ones you see in the photo link are a concession to modern H&S rules about 'safety equipment' being painted red.

 

The number of otherwise excellent, well researched, super-detailed BoB Spit models with a red bar is unbelievable.

 

Just saying....

 

Ken

Edited by Flankerman
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On a slightly different topic there was a program on channel 4 (in the uk) about the raf's supposed lack of involvement in dunkirk.

 

i meant to post about this before in case anyone missed it - it's available from all 4 for the next 3 days.

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He specifically wants to model  the aeroplane as used for filming last year, though... so DEFINITELY DO fit the red crowbar

50 minutes ago, Flankerman said:

Whatever you do - do not fit a crowbar to the cockpit door (if you pose it open) - especially not a RED one !!

 

1. They were not fitted until after the BoB

2. The red ones you see in the photo link are a concession to modern H&S rules about 'safety equipment' being painted red.

 

The number of otherwise excellent, well researched, super-detailed BoB Spit models with a red bar is unbelievable.

 

Just saying....

 

Ken

Edited by Work In Progress
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1 hour ago, Lawzer said:

On a slightly different topic there was a program on channel 4 (in the uk) about the raf's supposed lack of involvement in dunkirk.

 

 

I didn't find it very good or illuminating. It did argue for a rehabilitation of the RAF's perceived role in operations around 'Dynamo' but still pandered to many of the usual myths including that of the Spitfire.  Simon Parry did inject a smidgen of balance and objectivity in an all too brief appearance.

Cheers

Steve

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8 hours ago, Work In Progress said:

He specifically wants to model  the aeroplane as used for filming last year, though... so DEFINITELY DO fit the red crowbar

 

Now don't I feel stoopid..........:doh:

Ken

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On 28/07/2017 at 1:31 PM, Stonar said:

 

Thanks for sharing the pictures Steve...when I watched the film I thought the in flight shots of the Spit looking forward chasing the 109s showed the cowling to be very rounded...the Yak camera ship explains that!

 

Mick

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14 hours ago, Flankerman said:

Whatever you do - do not fit a crowbar to the cockpit door (if you pose it open) - especially not a RED one !!

 

1. They were not fitted until after the BoB

2. The red ones you see in the photo link are a concession to modern H&S rules about 'safety equipment' being painted red.

 

The number of otherwise excellent, well researched, super-detailed BoB Spit models with a red bar is unbelievable.

 

Just saying....

 

Ken

Ahh, that's why I was wondering why he had to struggle.

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On ‎28‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 11:55 PM, Sean_M said:

The Aircraft Restoration Company's Supermarine Spitfire Mk1 N3200 is the actual aircraft.

N3200 wasn't involved. According to JohnTerrell at WIX, who's something of a walking encyclopaedia of warbirds, the three Spitfires were the Mk.Ia AR213 (G-AIST), Mk.Ia X4650 (G-CGUK), and the "cleverly-disguised Mk.Vb EP122 (G-CISV) - all three owned by the Friedkin family IIRC.

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Codes are grey and this is correct since aircrafts in this scheme carried grey codes (medium sea grey)

The size of the codes could vary on early Spitfires (and did vary through the years). If you want to try and guess the size, the fuselage roundel should be 35". To me the codes look a bit smaller, may be something around 30".

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Ken, don't worry; you are now a member of a very large club; with a very large membership. You are in good company here. I am certain that you know a lot of the members. I did when I was inducted.

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On 30/07/2017 at 0:52 AM, Lightningboy2000 said:

Ahh, that's why I was wondering why he had to struggle.

I must admit that at that point in the film one of those dim and dusty memories surfaced.  Somehow or other over the years I got the idea that ditching procedures in the Spitfire involved sliding the canopy right back and opening the door to a 'half-latched' position to prevent it slamming forward and trapping the pilot.  (Now someone will come back and say that only applied to Seafires from '42 onwards . . .)

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On 7/29/2017 at 3:43 PM, mick b said:

 

Thanks for sharing the pictures Steve...when I watched the film I thought the in flight shots of the Spit looking forward chasing the 109s showed the cowling to be very rounded...the Yak camera ship explains that!

 

That and the plainly visible exhaust piping coming out of the bottom of the cowling. I appreciate what Nolan was going for, and realize most normal humans, capable of both loving others and of being loved in turn, won't be bothered by it -- or even notice -- but it was jarring for me.

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On 01/08/2017 at 4:30 AM, k5054nz said:

N3200 wasn't involved. According to JohnTerrell at WIX, who's something of a walking encyclopaedia of warbirds, the three Spitfires were the Mk.Ia AR213 (G-AIST), Mk.Ia X4650 (G-CGUK), and the "cleverly-disguised Mk.Vb EP122 (G-CISV) - all three owned by the Friedkin family IIRC.

EP122 could be recognised by its wing blisters.

 

Overall though I thought the attempt at realism all around was very commendable.

 

SPOILER ALERT!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

 

:lalala:

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the Spit landed on the beach, was I the only one who thought why didn't it head for one of the boats? Ok Kenneth Branagh would have copped it, but........ 

 

Trevor

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I get the feeling that it won't be long before someone, quite  possibly Amodel, release a scale model of the Yak camera ship with the markings we see for the filming.

 

If they haven't thought of it yet and they read it here; a free kit will do as payment for the idea :idea: .

 

Best regards

TonyT

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I'd quite like a Yakfire...AModel already do a series of Yak trainers so maybe it's an aftermarket opportunity for someone? Or else I may just bash one myself!

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I was disappointed by the burning Spit at the end clearly showing the broom handle shaft for the propeller, or was that a nod to the 60s BOB film that showed similar? Plus the wings flexing as the spit hit the sea....whole film didn't live up to the hype for me.

 

Mick

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Yes, I was bothered by the massive flaming void where the engine should have been.  And the whole plane burning pretty well considering it was empty of fuel and made of metal!  I guess Nolan wanted a Viking funeral ship look, without realizing that where that's done they build a perfect wooden replica, not a fibreglass shell...

To be fair my two teenaged daughters really liked the film, which was spectacular in episodes, I just felt it didn't work overall.  My wife thought it was poor, she usually complains at me saying things like "They didn't have XYZ till 1942", she didn't like the obvious 60s chalet bungalows near the dunes, the fly past of the town with post war hotels, nor the badly disguised container cranes.  Perhaps some (a little) CGI would have been worthwhile.  She much preferred the John Mills version on telly the other day!

Edited by malpaso
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I was disappointed with it too, though to be fair my wife thought it was great. I understand the decision to rely on actual hardware rather than on CGI and that if, for artistic reasons, that's the way the director feels the film should be, then there have to be compromises. And that while some of the compromises might be jarringly obvious to an anorak like me, 95% of the audience won't be aware of them. However, for me personally, one result was that it utterly failed to convey the scale of the action, a failure summed up in a nutshell when the Kenneth Branagh character proclaimed that "There are 400,000 men on these beaches". The camera had panned over the beach in an aerial shot and no, there weren't. There weren't even 400: I understand the number of extras was in fact 325, plus some cardboard cutouts. Nor, in reality, did the Luftwaffe send its bomber force over Dunkirk one aircraft at a time. I honestly don't want to sound unkind but in that respect, and despite the skill involved in the flying sequences, the film reminded me of some 1970s TV drama made with very limited resources. Nor did the constant jumping from one point of view to another work for me, especially with each of the three POVs running in a different timescale. And then there were the silly things that could have been avoided but that the director seems not to have considered worth the effort, like the ones Mick and Malpaso have pointed out and the 1970s BR Intercity carriage. I appreciate I'm in a minority here, and I wouldn't want my views to put anyone off going to see it - you might feel completely differently - but I too feel that the ancient John Mills version is far superior. 

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