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Thanks for all the compliments.  The kit is challenging, that's for sure.  The best advice I can offer anybody building an MFH kit is to plan the assembly carefully, not necessarily following the order in the instructions, and to test fit EVERYTHING first.  Some parts of the kit fit very well, some don't !!  However, it's nothing that can't be fixed.

 

Now, a request.  Does anybody have a photo of the rear brake cable.  I've stopped the outer of the Bowden cable at the rear bracket, and just run the inner to the brake actuator itself, but I'm not happy  with the way it looks.  The instructions show the outer running all the way to the brake actuator, but that doesn't sound right either.  All the photos I can find on the web either show a push rod from the brake pedal to brake (presumably an older model ?) or the brake is hidden behind the exhaust.  Can anybody help ?

 

Here is my effort.

 

IMG_2187_zps3zojuv3t.jpg

Edited by Mark_1984
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That's the way I was thinking it would be.

The outer cover ends securely and the cable extends to the brake lever.

Broughs were far from identical as well , keeping that in mind I have seen pics of a metal rod to the rear brake lever from the foot pedal.

link:

http://www.brough-superior.com/ws/frontend/seite/SeiteCms.php?coId=263&coType=navigation1

There are some books available I was gonna find , like a service manual that will have pics and drawings of the maintenance areas of the bikes. A number of omissions on the kit are in this area . Not hugely critical but some of us will want them.

If you google Brough Superior books they come up ; a parts manual and a service manual would be aa great help.

Edited by krow113
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Thanks to Les (Username number1 on another forum) I found a picture that shows it perfectly.  It's a different model, but I'm assuming the arrangement is the same.  It's picture 3 on the below link.  I have got it right !

 

https://www.pistonheads.com/classifieds/motorbikes/other-makes/other/1928-brough-superior-ss100-moby-dick/7141802#&gid=1&pid=3

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I decided to change my wire to some stranded cable. I tried to extract the old cable using some airbrush cleaner to soften the superglue, which has worked in the past. However, it was glued in far too well, and of course, you're past the point of no return once the cable is snipped. Unfortunately the end of the brake adjuster broke off, and I couldn't drill the wire out of it, copper being harder than the white metal, so I straightened up the bent remains and superglued the stranded wire in place. Here is the result, although the photo doesn't' show the strands in the cable very well. It's not too bad. I think it's an improvement, and I shall get it right first time on the front brake. I'll try to take a better photo in daylight.

IMG_2219_zpshngvfoch.jpg

 

You can also see the exhaust mounting bracket quite clearly.  It's attached to the swing arm with the cross headed screw.  I'm fairly certain that this screw is just there to add strength to the model, and isnt' there on the real thing.  The bar that holds the exhaust is fixed to the swinging arm pivot, you can see in the photo below.  From photos, this looks to be realistic.

 

IMG_2220_zpsgisy7brj.jpg

 

Who's up for another game of spot the paint chips !  I can see about 10 .....

As an aside, what do other people use to prime white metal ?  I'm using Mr Metal Primer, which is easy to apply, and seems to work OK, but it isn't brilliant.

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lol serves ya right! Crappy when ya go through that and the result is less than ys wanted.

I was looking at using a good quality enamel and baking the parts (low temp) , no primer. It has worked  well in the past on 1:1 parts.

Surface prep is always the key .

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Ok ... a random question here ... did these only ever come in black? Anybody know of a green one; I'm talking a "Brunswick green" sort of an Express steam engine green. In my mind I can see one of these with "straw" pinstriping and a lot of polished brass and copper ................................... all of this, of course, may just be me!

 

PS I have google imaged this to bits.

PPS ........... I can see it in a dark Atlantic blue as well with straw/red striping.

 

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These bikes were built pretty much to customers requirements, so I don't see why there shouldn't have been a Brunswick Green one.  No idea whether there was or not, and I can't find a picture of one either.  Still, your kit, your choice of colour !

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Hi Mark,

Stunning progress, you are really making a nice job of this,

I have a question, I have this kit, is it possible to test assemble this kit fully before painting using say, white glue (except the wheels of course). then break it down and then paint and reassemble once you know everything is going to fit correctly?

Best Regards

Keith.

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Hi Andi, I don't think factory bikes came in anything but black and chrome, but the customer would be able to specify the mechanical and performance parts to their personal liking.
Once in private hands, the owner could do as he pleased with the colour and there's photos on the web showing silver and metallic frame and cycle parts. There's even a racer with a lavender finish!

 

Keith, Like Mark says, that wouldn't work well. The paint would shell off where the parts were separated and white glue would be too weak to support much weight. The best approach is to build the bike like the real thing where possible and then paint each completed sub assembly.

Don't know if you've seen a site called Kim's House Garage. It's all in Japanese but some of the photo studies are quite helpful on the "in progress" section, particularly the Vincent build. He aligns all the important holes in the frame and forks with brass rods. This can be done during the assembly and they can be removed when the parts have set and prior to painting. Have a look anyway - I find it's good for inspiration. It's not been updated for a long time but the principles hold good for large and small scales and metal or plastic. Knowing many of the base kits, some of the work is remarkable.

 

Dave

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1 hour ago, Fastcat said:

Hi Andi, I don't think factory bikes came in anything but black and chrome, but the customer would be able to specify the mechanical and performance parts to their personal liking.
Once in private hands, the owner could do as he pleased with the colour and there's photos on the web showing silver and metallic frame and cycle parts. There's even a racer with a lavender finish!

 

Dave

1

 

Thanks Dave ... I kind of figured as much, I was just hoping to be a little different that's all, and especially if I'm to document the build - it would have just helped I think to generate a bit of interest and curiosity.

But whilst it won't be a build for rivet counters (by any means) I've been around model shows and club benches long enough to not want to spend the rest of my natural hearing in a very nasal monotone ..."They only ever came in black you know"!

 

Thanks for the input.

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Hi Andi...I encountered the same problem researching the Brough for a project of my own. I like the idea of doing something a bit different too. I got hold of a Minichamps 1/12 Brough very cheaply and plan to modify it substantially when I can get off my backside and get on with it.

Trouble is back in the '20s and '30s, bike colours were pretty sober and unimaginative in the UK (with a few exceptions). When Vincent exported to the USA it did a special version in red! American bikes weren't known for being shy and retiring. 

Apart from the lavender version the only major Brough colour variation I've been able to find was on the Golden Dream which as might be expected was all gold. I like the idea of a dark green but seemingly George Brough didn't!

Wouldn't take too much notice of the "experts". I've had an Aston Martin identified as a Jaguar, a BSA as a Triumph and various others...........must be the way I build 'em.................

 

Look forward to seeing your build.

 

Dave

Edited by Fastcat
cocked up my spelling
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20 hours ago, Fastcat said:

Keith, Like Mark says, that wouldn't work well. The paint would shell off where the parts were separated and white glue would be too weak to support much weight. The best approach is to build the bike like the real thing where possible and then paint each completed sub assembly.

Don't know if you've seen a site called Kim's House Garage. It's all in Japanese but some of the photo studies are quite helpful on the "in progress" section, particularly the Vincent build. He aligns all the important holes in the frame and forks with brass rods. This can be done during the assembly and they can be removed when the parts have set and prior to painting. Have a look anyway - I find it's good for inspiration. It's not been updated for a long time but the principles hold good for large and small scales and metal or plastic. Knowing many of the base kits, some of the work is remarkable.

 

Dave

 

Thanks for the info Dave I'll take a look.

Regards

Keith

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A bit more progress.  Handle bars done.  The speedo bezel was a right pain to fit !  The body is too big and it's a real pain to file a ridge for it to fit over.

 

IMG_2229_zpsyaseax5f.jpg

 

Headlamp

 

IMG_2228_zpsrihvk22g.jpg

 

IMG_2226_zpsxdzodwq7.jpg

 

Headlamp and pedestrian slicer fitted.

 

IMG_2234_zpsyn8bgqua.jpg

 

Rear number plate

 

IMG_2236_zpsno9zelii.jpg

 

Finally, the gratuitous overall shot, just to show off the overall progress.

 

IMG_2238_zpsp4emi34r.jpg

 

Excuse all the clutter in the background - I'm too busy making models to waste time tidying up !!

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I'm thinking of replacing the rubber seat that came with the kit with a leather one.  However, I'm struggling to come up with a way of making a former that I can cover.  The supplied rubber is too soft use as a former, and I want something a bit thinner anyway. Also, I don't want to risk messing up the kit part, in case my efforts fail.   Has anybody got any suggestions ?

Edited by Mark_1984
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You're too kind Andi.

 

Exhausts on now.

 

ExKzmhvh.jpg

 

efifCoEh.jpg

 

eU8wUIfh.jpg

 

Just the saddle to go now.  As said, I'm trying to replicate this in leather, so it may be a month or so before I finish that as I'll get the leather in the UK during my summer holiday.  Still, I can always put the kit part in place for now.

It'll probably take me that long to touch up all the chips !!!

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1 hour ago, Mark_1984 said:

You're too kind Andi.

 

 

Not at all ... this is an exemplary kit. Modelled beautifully with a clean and easy style. You have done yourself, the subject, and the kit proud. .......................... Marvelous.

 

PS ... when all said and done this thread has inspired me to make mine own attempt - the subject of which should be winging its way across the Pacific as we speak.

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