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Oil Brusher Paints

AMMO of Mig Jiménez

 

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Using oils for weathering effects is hardly a new technique, but it has been occasionally hit-and-miss if you happen to buy the wrong oils with gritty pigment, or forget to let the oils "breathe" on a piece of card to wick away the excess oil that slows down drying and makes it harder to achieve certain effects.  The lead foil tubes and their caps can also be an impediment, as they are prone to sticking in place if not used frequently, and we have all probably twisted a tube badly whilst trying to undo it at some point.  Then there's finding a good brush to apply the paint, cleaning it afterward etc. etc. It can all be a bit of a faff.

 

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You know what's coming next, don't you?  Let me introduce you to the new AMMO Oil Brusher system.  Not the most exciting brand name, but very descriptive.  These tubular pots of oil paint have been formulated not to need any oily residue wicking away, and the long black cap has a captive brush with a stiff set of bristles that works rather well.  There is a scraper-lip inside the neck that removes the excess paint, and leaves the brush with just about the right amount of paint for the job in hand.  The body of the bottle is clear so it's easy to see which bottle you have hold of, and there are 21 shades in the range at launch, with more on the way I'm sure.  The screw cap coupled with the rigid body should prevent any clogging down the line, and if the lid does seize, there's plenty to get hold of to apply your massive forearm strength to.  If that doesn't work, just run some hot water over the lid to soften any residue.  Below are the available shades at launch:

 

A.MIG.3500 Black   A.MIG.3511 Red Primer
A.MIG.3501 White   A.MIG.3512 Dark Brown
A.MIG.3502 Yellow   A.MIG.3513 Starship Filth
A.MIG.3503 Red   A.MIG.3514 Earth
A.MIG.3504 Dark Blue   A.MIG.3515 Ochre
A.MIG.3505 Olive Green   A.MIG.3516 Dust
A.MIG.3506 Field Green   A.MIG.3517 Buff
A.MIG.3507 Dark Green   A.MIG.3518 Sunny Flesh
A.MIG.3508 Dark Mud   A.MIG.3519 Light Flesh
A.MIG.3509 Medium Grey   A.MIG.3520 Basic Flesh
A.MIG.3510 Rust      

 

Following the initial releases, the intended subject matter has broadened with the colour range erring toward Sci-Fi, as evidenced by the Warhammer 40K and Gundam themed names of some of the more recent colours, which meshes with the (fairly) recent book and paint set releases that have firmly placed AMMO in the Sci-Fi miniature and modelling arena.  This should attract a larger customer base from the widening of genre, although the Warhammer 40K guys are used to everything being available from their own shops, so that may be a tougher market to crack.

 

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To save you craning your neck due to the increased slant of the bottles in the picture, and risking injury, the colours are as follows:

 

A.MIG.3523 Dusty Earth   A.MIG.3531 Mecha Dark Green
A.MIG.3525 Red Tile   A.MIG.3532 Starship Bay Sludge
A.MIG.3526 Space Purple   A.MIG.3538 Silver
A.MIG.3527 Marine Blue      

 

 

Streaking Brushers

A new batch of Oil Brushers have arrived now, and these are intended as useful streaking colours, allowing you to apply an amount to an area, then later streak it in your preferred direction with a thinners dampened brush to mimic the effect of nature on rust, dirt and general grime.  Very convenient!

 

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A.MIG-1250 Medium Brown   A.MIG-1255 Winter Grime
A.MIG-1252 Red Brown   A.MIG-1258 Streaking Dust
A.MIG-1254 Rust      
         

 

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Clearly my test wasn't exhaustive, but was enough for me to get an idea of how the pigments would work.  I experimented with streaking, shading, and "general grime", and considering the unsympathetic base colour white, the results were promising.  Thanks as usual to my 1:72 He.111 wing for putting up with my experimentations.  The thinners I used was some old stuff I had lying around but should give a fair representation.  I've noticed during use that if you store your Oil Brushers upside down, or at least tilted so that the brush is exposed, that the bristles can dry out.  This has prompted me to order the Oil Brusher Organizer, which you can find a link for below, as it's a good investment to keep your fine-tipped brush in good condition throughout the life of the product :)

 

You will (as mentioned) need some high quality low odour thinners to blend the oils once applied, whether it is to shade an area, or to effect the oil-dot technique, but if you don't already have some on hand, AMMO have a 100ml bottle that is specifically designed for use with their products here.  In use the pigment is dense, and finely ground so that gritty finishes aren't a concern, allowing you to streak, blend and paint without worry, whilst applying only as much as you wish to.  Oddly, there is no fill level noted on either the bottle or the accompanying literature, but I found that they hold 10ML whilst rooting around their site.  You can buy the full set or individually as you need them, but you may want to consider getting one of the new organisers that have been designed to fit the full 21, and has been laser cut from fine MDF with a white surface finish and the AMMO logo at the front.

 

Highly recommended.

 

Oil Brushers

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Streaking Brushers

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Organizer

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Enamel Thinners

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Review sample courtesy of

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I've updated the review with a shot of the new selection of colours that arrived recently, which also shows off the fact that we've had a new logo and photo backdrop since the original!  If you've not read the review yet, please do as they're a useful and time-saving tool. :)

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I've updated the review with a recent batch of new colours, including some interesting Sci-Fi and Gundam related shades. :)

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16 minutes ago, Panzer Vor!!! said:

Could you use these for painting Figures  instead of buying oil paint in a tube ??

 

 

I don't see why not. They are still oil paints like you would use for figure painting just a little thinned down. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 31/10/2017 at 7:43 PM, Panzer Vor!!! said:

Could you use these for painting Figures  instead of buying oil paint in a tube ??

 

Just bought a few set to have a try.

I think you can, yes, but their range is not yet very wide.

And here, mixing colours is not an option.

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