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Badder

Ever evolvin dio - Moss after 5months sitting on shelf

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After a coat of gloss varnish I applied washes, again using plaster of paris and antelope brown in a variety of ratios.

jBMuRWa.jpg

 

7VTrzLw.jpg

 

WBuYRJz.jpg

 

Another coat of gloss varnish will be applied and then some acrylic ink pin washes. No will be added this plaster time.

Hopefully that will conclude this brief return to this project.

 

TFL

Badder

Edited by Badder

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1 minute ago, Steve_farrier said:

Looks really authentic that!! 

Thanks Steve,

It certainly looks better than it did!

I'm not 100% happy with it, but I'm hoping that the following darker washes will make me feel happier!

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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Hmmmmm....

Now, I know that gloss varnish makes colours look much darker, or alters them in some other way, but making them disappear entirely is a new one on me!

I am trusting that the final coat of matt varnish will make them reappear.

 

In the meantime, I gave everything a wash with dark green, which also disappeared. I hope that this reappears too! I was going to add some black pin washes but as I have no idea what all the other colours are going to turn out like, I've decided against it.

 

So a coat of matt will come now.

 

Here's the building before that final coat:

HV2nehW.jpg

 

BTW I'm using the 0.4mm needle for varnish. My 0.2mm needle can't handle undiluted varnish.

 

TFL

Badder

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Well, that was all rather weird!

The effects I'd applied before the gloss varnish didn't all come back with the matt varnish. The only bits that did come back were the more yellowy plaster washes - which was not an effect I'd ever wanted. I don't understand how the light green plaster vanished, but the yellow didn't. And even the dark green washes didn't show up which is even more confusing saying as I added that AFTER the gloss varnish.

 

So, I've reapplied a pale green plaster wash to the front of the building (over a matt varnish) Meanwhile the other 3 walls have a gloss varnish. I will have to matt these before they get the pale green plaster wash.

 

I am wondering if these washes should have been left for 24hrs or more before a varnish was applied. Should I risk it?

Come back next week to find out whether I did!

 

TFL

Badder.

 

 

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Another visit to the stonework.

This morning I had a go at re-doing the rear wall, with the same antelope brown and plaster-dust washes. No matt varnish this time, because I don't want the effects to disappear again!

 

In this photo, I've re-washed the ground floor and have picked out a few stones with a thicker mix - the most obvious of those stones being top right corner of the said wall.

AKlSPHT.jpg

 

Left hand window:

r58yBa6.jpg

 

Right hand window:

ERfu4rY.jpg

 

Now the top floor wall:

XDOJnnN.jpg

 

Left window

D51f4g3.jpg

 

Right window:

3PaTBs2.jpg

 

Close-up.

EjUw33i.jpg

 

That's it for now. Hopefully I can get the rest of the walls looking as good as this.

That's work for another day though.

 

TFL

Badder

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Not looked at this for a while, but all I can say is that there are a few buildings around where I live that look just like that.

 

John.

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Thanks John,

Your reply prompted me to look at your location. I never noticed before. Lucky so-and-so!

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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Hi Badder. Just been checking up on what you are doing with this one. That walling is looking very good - the effects as usual do look really natural. Did you ever decide what to do a about a matt varnish coat? The last set of photos seem to show a matt finish?

Kind regards,

Stix

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4 hours ago, PlaStix said:

Hi Badder. Just been checking up on what you are doing with this one. That walling is looking very good - the effects as usual do look really natural. Did you ever decide what to do a about a matt varnish coat? The last set of photos seem to show a matt finish?

Kind regards,

Stix

Cheers Stix,

What you see now is equal to the stage I got to last weekend. But back then I thought I'd protect the plaster-dust with a matt varnish. The matt varnish though, made the majority of the effects disappear. Possibly the airbrush blows the dust away as the varnish is applied, or the varnish itself somehow nullifies /dissolves it and washes it away, but I did keep the air pressure really low, so it's more likely the second.

This time I decided to forgo the matt varnish completely. However, whilst plaster-dust washes do in themselves give any gloss surface a matt finish. I am not confident that the effects are 'fixed'. I suspect I could remove the majority of it with a wet brush.

 

I refer you to the ruination of my 'lichen effects' on the roof in my other diorama. I'm not sure now if that was down to applying a matt varish to protect the effects, or trying to apply some more washes directly on top of what I had done already. Whatever, the plaster-dust wash technique needs some fiddling with.

I will experiment with the idea of adding matt varnish or matt medium to the plaster dust wash itself.

 

Rearguards

Badder

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Hi again Badder. Reading through your post I was about to suggest adding Matt varnish to your mix but then you mentioned it in your final paragraph. I think it would be worth trying it. One of the reasons I only use acrylic paints for my projects for weathering is that they are fixed in place without relying on being sealed on by something else. I know this limits my results but, as the only way I can apply a fixative is by brush or spraycan Matt varnish, it means I'd probably end up washing or blowing away any other mediums.

Kind regards,

Stix

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5 hours ago, PlaStix said:

One of the reasons I only use acrylic paints for my projects for weathering is that they are fixed in place without relying on being sealed

This is a difficult one.

 

Acrylic Inks were only invented in the past decade (so I believe) and I'm not certain of their chemical properties, or characteristics.

 

My thinking is that the plaster dust is anhydrous and does not dissolve in water, but goes into suspension. Adding acrylic ink to the mix colours the water and 'coats' the plaster dust. So, when re-wetted with water, ink, or varnish, there could be several things going on. 

1. The plaster dust is released, taking the colour with it.

2. The ink is washed off of the plaster dust and both can re-settle separately, or together in some altered ratio.

3. Washed 'free'' of the plaster, the ink can resettle and become water resistant when dried, while the plaster dust forever remains 'moveable'.

 

Whatever, the problem is the plaster dust. It's the plaster which needs to be 'fixed' in place once dry.

 

So, I will definitely try adding matt varnish or matt medium to the mix and see if that makes a difference. Another idea might be to try plaster straight from the box/bag, rather than 'used' plaster dust. Maybe when allowed to dry it will 'set' more permanently and will accept a spray with matt varnish without washing off?

 

Rearguards

Badder

 

 


 

 

 

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I saw this paperpunch in Hobbycraft and just had to buy it:

talYUZc.jpg

Sorry for the blurred photo.

 

The bits that interested me were the little petals around the central circle. Not quite oak leaf shaped, not quite ivy shaped, but close enough to both.

The fantastic thing about this punch is that I will get 18 leaves per punch.

But better still.... Look at the size of them compare to the 1/35th figure:

lAI0Ejt.jpg

 

These are pretty bloomin' small, and compare favourably with the 'purpose-made' leaf punches available for model-makers like us.

 

This punch cost £5.60. A bargain.

 

When work recommences on this diorama I shall be using this punch a lot as I intend to replace the 'Seafoam' bushes and trees with better ones.

But I shall also be using this punch for the ivy on my current diorama 'Pit Stop'.

TFL

 

Badder

 

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@PlaStix

Edited by Badder

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Grrrrrr! Why am I unable to use the @'member's name' function? Yeah, the name pops up but no further typing is allowed. And I've tried editing and deleting as well.

 

Anyway, Stix, I have had a bash at mixing an Acrylic Medium to the plaster dust wash while messing about with the building in my other diorama, and, like the matt varnish, this also kills the effect. The dust just seems to dissolve and totally disappear.

 

There is another possible 'solution' to this - forgive the pun - and that's MicroSol. That stuff certainly 'fixes' weathering powders in place. I shall give that a go tomorrow and report back.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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I've decided for now, just to go ahead with the 'plaster-dust washes' again, and this time not worry about fixing them in place.  I have an idea to use MicroSol and then a matt varnish, or possibly hairspray and a matt varnish. I have yet to test either. Ultimately, fixing the washes in place may not be necessary. So long as the model stays dry, and/or isn't rubbed, they aren't going to move.

 

Here's the current state of affairs after a wash with water/plaster dust/antelope brown. I will do one more wash with a paler mix.

eZe63kz.jpg

 

iGHWaFS.jpg

 

PMVfw1G.jpg

 

07niQSY.jpg

 

And the side wall:

Jvk514D.jpg

 

sP4c1EJ.jpg

 

NGJa4wn.jpg

 

More pics after the paler washes.

PS. I will be experimenting with MicroSol (or hairspray) and plaster-dust washes to age the building in my diorama 'Pit Stop'.

 

TFL

Badder

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Jaw-droppingly good - as ever. I know you've explained how you've done it but I still suspect that some form of witchcraft is in use here...

 

Are the ivy leaves from the new Hobbycraft punch? Or is that a pleasure still to come?

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Just now, bhouse said:

Jaw-droppingly good - as ever. I know you've explained how you've done it but I still suspect that some form of witchcraft is in use here...

 

Are the ivy leaves from the new Hobbycraft punch? Or is that a pleasure still to come?

Hi Brian, and thanks.

I hope you are well.

I'll answer your last question first. Yes, these leaves were made using a relatively cheap paperpunch from Hobbycraft. (Not the one pictured above) I think the one I used cost about 7 quid. The punch makes a 'paper-chain of snowflakes', but I noticed that the snowflakes themselves had 'ivy-leaf' shapes for each of their 'arms'. If you go back through the WIP you'll see how I used whole chains of snowflakes, pairs of snowflakes, and single snowflakes, folding them and joining them in certain ways to create a variety of 'clumps' of leaves. Looking back now I should have creased each leaf along its axis, just to add some extra realism. It would have  quintupled the build time, but hey. I now have a collection of different Hobbycraft punches, each with parts that can be used as leaves. I also have he RP Tools leaf punch set. It's my mission to make the most realistic plants that I can. There's a long way to go yet, but I am slowly narrowing down the methods.

 

As for insinuating that I use witchcraft, I forgive you. The plaster-dust wash is extremely quick and simple, like the waving of a wand, but requires no magic.

The 'secret' if there is one, is to use an airbrush to 'chase' the wash around once it's been applied by brush. The main reason for doing it is to get the wash under all those leaves, where a brush can't get to so easily, but the other benefits are that an airbrush doesn't leave brush strokes behind AND it dries the wash within a few seconds. I tend to apply a heavy wash first (one with lots of plaster dust and ink) let it dry, then go over it with a water-laden brush to reactivate it. I then blow the wash around and off and let it dry again, repeating this again and again until I get the desired look.

Rearguards,

Badder

 

 

Edited by Badder

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After a paler wash (Water, plaster-dust, less antelope brown ink)

 

lZqWPSf.jpg

 

fsbPzxD.jpg

 

oQJFzu6.jpg

 

NEEX7Kq.jpg

 

Zh7hEWz.jpg

 

Above^

The rough-looking stuff (crushed Dil tops) once resembled some kind of creeping plant, or moss, or something. It was dark green when first applied, but over the course of a year it has faded to a brownish grey. It has since then taken on the colour of the washes. I will be staining it green again at some point. Oh, and the ivy leaves will be getting a touch-up as well.

 

TFL

Badder

Edited by Badder

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Hi Badder. Hope you are keeping well. To be really honest - looking at the photos above - I could be looking at a real building. Stunning scenic modelling throughout. :worthy:

With regards the dust washes - I know you know I don't use anything which requires fixing. I lot of the dust effects I get are done by using very, very thinned (with water) Acrylic paints - usually Revell's Gunship Grey or Light Grey. I also 'bother' the wash while it's drying - which usually doesn't take long. You'd have to do one face of the building at a time - with that face facing up - so the thinned wash settles into the recesses on the walls/features. I usually apply them with a soft, medium sized brush and then keep working on the wash as it dries - getting it thinner in some areas. Stippling as it dries also gives different effects. As it dries the paint often takes on a dust-like apearance that doesn't need any other fixative. It might might not be suitable for what you want but I thought it might be worth a mention. You could practice on some scrap first.

Kind regards,

Stix

 

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On 10/15/2018 at 11:29 AM, PlaStix said:

Hi Badder. Hope you are keeping well. To be really honest - looking at the photos above - I could be looking at a real building. Stunning scenic modelling throughout. :worthy:

With regards the dust washes - I know you know I don't use anything which requires fixing. I lot of the dust effects I get are done by using very, very thinned (with water) Acrylic paints - usually Revell's Gunship Grey or Light Grey. I also 'bother' the wash while it's drying - which usually doesn't take long. You'd have to do one face of the building at a time - with that face facing up - so the thinned wash settles into the recesses on the walls/features. I usually apply them with a soft, medium sized brush and then keep working on the wash as it dries - getting it thinner in some areas. Stippling as it dries also gives different effects. As it dries the paint often takes on a dust-like apearance that doesn't need any other fixative. It might might not be suitable for what you want but I thought it might be worth a mention. You could practice on some scrap first.

Kind regards,

Stix

 

Hi Stix,

I am well thanks for asking. Hope you are too.

I think I've said it before, but I am amazed at how these walls are looking as well! As you say, (apart from the ivy) they could pass for the real thing in the photos. And I've said this before as well; they look so much better in macro than in 1/1 scale!

Of course, I have followed your work and have read your comments throughout this WIP regarding your methods/techniques, and of course I also use acrylic and enamel washes for weathering in most circumstances. I know I could get the same results as above using those paints in washes, however, the 'plaster-dust wash technique' is SO much quicker, dead simple, and is more easily 'repairable' if things should go wrong. I know I've made the mistake of letting an acrylic or (worse still) an enamel wash dry and then found I couldn't remove it afterwards without ruining the layers beneath. Even these acrylic inks I'm using can sometimes stain the underlying mediums and prove difficult, if not impossible to remove, especially when applied to bare plaster!

Another point to consider is that I was constantly adding bits to this building (and even more so with my Pit Stop builing) and that often requires a bit of filing and sanding, the plaster dust getting everywhere. It was being 'fed up' with having to clean this off that I one day decided to wash it off with a wet brush, and discovered the side effects. Repeatedly 'cleaning' my buildings in this way has built up those layers which now look so realistic.

Absolutely, I do and will continue to use 'normal' washes, but whilst working with plaster buildings I do like the plaster dust washes - an extra tool in the box, so to speak.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

 

 

 

Edited by Badder

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HAVING SOLVED THE PROBEM OF NOT BEING ABLE TO ACCESS MY IMGUR ACCOUNT, I CAN NOW ACCESS MY PHOTOS AGAIN. (I don't know what the problem was, but I had to add the Imgur address to my 'Trusted Sites' in my Internet Options and tick the 'Enable Protected Mode' box. It may be that BOTH of these actions were required, or maybe just one of them 'solved' the problem.

Whatever, I've got little done in the way of model-making over the past few days, but I HAVE found myself staring at the large tree I made for this diorama (The tree resides on a bookshelf gathering dust and those horrible extremely long-legged spiders) and I got to thinking that the tree is far too bushy and 'solid'. I have been 'suspecting' this to be the case for a while, but now I'm sure.

 

A reminder of what it looks like at the moment:

 

 

yXsAFWg.jpg

 

QEdMoWH.jpg

 

So, my bush needs a trim!

 

 

Now, those who followed this tree's construction will know that the 'twigs' to which the 'leaves' are glued, are actually made from nylon monofilament fishing line, and that those 'twigs' are attached to the tree using twine with a wire core. So, I should be able to cut and remove, or bend and repostion a lot of the 'branches' and give the tree more 'open' silhouette.

 

Work on this will commence shortly.

 

TFL

Badder

Edited by Badder

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Good luck with the manscaping !

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2 hours ago, RichO said:

Good luck with the manscaping !

Hi Rich,

Thanks! I think!

I have had a go at trimming it, removing just a few cubic inches, or 'a 1/20th Brazillian' as it's known in the trade. Unfortunately, the whole thing has 'stiffened up' over the interveining months and my idea to reshape the tree by bending the twigs and branches hasn't been as successful as I'd hoped. With greater force required, there was an issue with the bush dropping  hairs  leaves. as well.

I will have another look at it, maybe this weekend and have another go. At the end of the day, it wouldn't be a total disaster just to leave it be. It was just me being fussy again!

 

Hope u r well,

Rearguards,

Badder

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