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Procopius

Восток — дело тонкое (1/72 Trumpeter Su-24M FENCER-D)

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Another vote for dot and drag here, although in my case using Gouache rather than oils (although I have oils in the stash waiting for an excuse to try it.)

 

and im sure this is obvious, but less is always more, easy to add extra harder to take away excess 

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In case you're still looking at that oil streaking.

 

I've used a product called AK Engine oil, looks and smells like a thinned dark brown glossy enamel paint (well it certainly acted like one when half the contents emptied into my paint drawer :wall:).  I'm sure a suitable oil or enamel paint could be used instead.

 

I apply it heavily thinned with odourless turps and it creates nice oil staining effects. You can form and shape these with a turps moistened cotton bud. Use a plain cotton bud to feather the edges to avoid taking the stain off completely. Since this inevitably lightens the stain at the origin point you'll need to carefully paint some more on.

 

I usually also pre-stain the area using super thinned dark paint applied via the airbrush (just like painting an exhaust stain).You then define and build up the staining using the oils. It'll help keep the origin end darker.

 

I used it on my spitfire underside oil stain, apologies for the rogue image link :whistle:

20161010_002218_HDR_zpssk8fnag7.jpg

 

To be honest though looking at those photos you've linked I'd go very sparing on the actual oils and just airbrush that stain on using some dark brown  / black coloured paint.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Edited by Squibby

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20 hours ago, TheBaron said:

Reading this back reminds me that  layering/accumulation is something fundamental in designing the 'look' of narrative spaces in films to create a believably consistent world for the viewer. Blade Runner is an oft-cited example of this:

https://books.google.ie/books?id=fM7XDOmi9jUC&pg=PA42&lpg=PA42&dq=ridley+scott+visual+layering+blade+runner&source=bl&ots=GSr7CuRR-T&sig=JCPTPpNZALv0NrjvJiBR4vdqoTI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiUsdOKr_3QAhWnIsAKHQiaDWYQ6AEIJDAD#v=onepage&q=ridley scott visual layering blade runner&f=false

 

This is actually a subject of particular interest to me. 

 

6 hours ago, Squibby said:

I've used a product called AK Engine oil, looks and smells like a thinned dark brown glossy enamel paint (well it certainly acted like one when half the contents emptied into my paint drawer :wall:).  I'm sure a suitable oil or enamel paint could be used instead.

 

That's in fact what I used, though with far less assurance than you, and obviously inferior results as well.

 

Anyhow -- she's sort of on her pins! Or was for a few minutes as a test.

 

30925960413_3504ec0ca0_h.jpg20161218_210150 by Edward IX, on Flickr

 

30925960803_5b21043ceb_b.jpg20161218_210200 by Edward IX, on Flickr

 

31362854590_557c86028b_h.jpg20161218_210204 by Edward IX, on Flickr

 

The gear assembly is neither well-diagrammed nor particularly intuitive, a major pet peeve of mine. 

 

But the best is yet to come. You know those stupid potato graters that Russian jets so often have on the nosewheels?

 

1*jgmUueD1yJX4jCo9VBrJ9w.jpeg

 

 

The one in the kit simply DOES NOT FIT. In fact, it sheared off one of the wheels when I tried to put it on, and after I thinned it out and tried again, it sheared off the other goddamn wheel. I used a word that rhymes with "trucking" (and which is frequently used by those who do) pretty freely at this point. How was this missed? Jesus Christ.

 

31362858590_f4a609cb0e_h.jpg20161218_205646 by Edward IX, on Flickr

 

 

 

 

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That's pretty damned annoying even from an outside perspective.....One last kick in the nadgers from Trumpeter, right at the end when you are least expecting it!  :o

 

That's just spiteful that is!  :unsure:

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Trumpeter bits not fitting? I feel for you PC... :(

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Gosh

 

And goldarn

 

And oh golly

 

No, when it comes to it a thorough grounding in 'Truckerspeak' is irreplaceable

 

I really thought you'd made it to the end safely, now I'm mildly fugueing along with you

 

Beggarit!

 

I know throw away the nosewheels and bury the nosegear in a mound of seasonal Russki snow

 

Just the top of the cover showing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looks like scratch building time

 

:(

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2 minutes ago, Jessica said:

Use it as a master, and plunge form a new one overtop.

 

Unfortunately that's rather far out of my comfort zone, and as I leave for "vacation" (which will be neither relaxing, nor pleasant) on Thursday, I'd like to keep things simple so I can finish this before I go into internal exile.

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How have I missed all this? Sorry to arrive at such a frustrating time. Is it too narrow for the wheels, or is the internal radius too small?

 

Regards,

Adrian

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Well, I guess our FB chat about troublesome ruskie landing gear was a sort of foreshadowing? 

 

I would cut down the middle and insert a spacer, but only because that sounds like the most sane and obvious answer. Or, leave it off.

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12 minutes ago, AdrianMF said:

How have I missed all this? Sorry to arrive at such a frustrating time. Is it too narrow for the wheels, or is the internal radius too small?

 

Too narrow. So stupid. 

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Fit the nozwheel back on,cut the mountings off the mudguard thingy.

 

Remake the mountings on the mudguard thingy with fuse wire secured to mudguard thingy with a wipe of epoxy

or cyano.

That way they'll be wide enough to fit over the noz wheels..........

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7 minutes ago, Procopius said:

Is fuse wire a really common household object in the UK? 

Only in the houses of modellers and those who fiddle about making their own electronics.

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Standard supplies for 'people of a certain age' when we were taught how to 'mend a fuse' in the days when houses had 'fuse boxes'. I'm not sure what's 'standard' in the U.S. but, if Star Trek is anything to go by, they don't bother and the slightest incident causes all the electrical panels to explode...

Nowadays most houses are fitted with earth-leakage and overload trip switch thingies (technical term).

I had a quick panic as I'd used some of my small stock to mend a Christmas decoration but it's OK, it's still readily available over here from electronic and DIY stores - phew!

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Corner shops too Ced

 

My little minisupermarket has a small stand on a pillar which sells dummies for children

(do they really still stuff little rubber teats in kid's gobs? wow!) needles, safety pins and cocktail sticks as well as fuse wire and a yard/metre of knicker elastic or twenty cotton buds

 

No problem here in civilisation getting daft stuff   :)

 

Not so sure about the wilds of Bathshire though, but you do have a rather nice walk though market hall

 

Great bookseller in there

 

And back on topic, I can see one pack of fusewire from this seat and there are at least three more around the walls of my garage hanging off a nail or three

Edited by perdu
can't regulate my meters/metres :(

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Those trip thingies are called circuit breakers on this side of the pond.

 

Fuse wires are not difficult to locate over here in the colonies.  Most good automotive stores have tons of the stuff. (Assuming that by fuse wire you mean 5A/10A/30A wire)

 

Star Trek electronics function based on the physics of the plot. Never forget they gave us this-

 

 

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2 hours ago, Thud4444 said:

Never forget they gave us this-

This was the best part of my day.

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Wesley Crusher! Aaargh!

In the words of Sheldon Cooper: "I hate you Will Wheaton"

 

Next, it'll be Jake Sisko or some other such horror!!!

 

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12 hours ago, Procopius said:

 

Unfortunately that's rather far out of my comfort zone, and as I leave for "vacation" (which will be neither relaxing, nor pleasant) on Thursday, I'd like to keep things simple so I can finish this before I go into internal exile.

Okay, how about using a piece of pie plate and forming it over the guard? Pack it full of Milliput to give it strength, cut out a rectangle of pie plate, stretch and form it over the now rock-hard mudguard, then trim to shape and make the side supports from wire.  Of course, knowing my luck, I'll have given you advice which results in humongous gaps because it's now ridiculously oversize.

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