Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hooray, Hooray I'm underway, here begins my first BM Work in Progress post!

 

I have this last week just started on this Crusader. Nothing to show in this post, but more to follow very soon.

 

For now, a test first image:

 

SMRR-MC-316101013150-1_zpsoxgoqy8d

All going well you should see a finished model - however not mine.  Instead, as the caption says, it's a photo of Short's original wind tunnel model.  I hope it inspires you as it did me!  If not, then I defy you to tell me this wonderful drawing does not excite:

 

11-07-09_shortcrus_zpsgjyrrscu

 

All going well, more soon ...

 

g.

Edited by greggles.w
Farewell Photobucket!
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello again all & thanks for the welcome Martian,

 

The kit: Karaya's 1/48 all resin offering.

 

2_zpselqgfpgh

 

The image below shows the parts.

 

2A_zpstixdqrwr

 

I have already cleaned up the larger parts. The smaller ones are still as first tipped from their zip-lock bags. The pile of bits at the top right are for the beaching trolley, which I don't intend to use.  The parts in the lower left corner are Vector's resin Bristol Mercury engine.  Seen again here, lovely stuff:

 

2B_zps5hnez5th

 

I bought this with an intention to model the aircraft with one or more cylinder cowling covers removed. The Vector engine is a later version of the Mercury - to suit Gladiators, Lysanders, Blenheims etc - whereas the Crusader had the very first version, the Mercury I.  The first of 20,000 engines!  The Mercury I didn't yet have the distinctive rocker cover on the cylinder heads like the later (Vector) versions, & you can see above that I experimented with removing this cover on the one spare cylinder (top left) which comes in the Vector kit ..

 

I'm now more inclined to celebrate the unique streamlining of the Crusader's power plant. However the Vector engine won't go to waste.  I'm using it as a core around which to scratch build a complete new cowling.

 

More on that in my next post ...

 

 

Edited by greggles.w
Farewell Photobucket!
  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like a very nice kit indeed, and it's certainly a fantastic,and unusual, subject - I'll definitely be following this one!

 

Ian

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Crusader is my favourite Schneider type racer, that helmeted Mercury is well out there to my eye, I'd love to do one in 1/72 but will enjoy watching this come together just as well.

Steve.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi again all,

 

Here's an aside re the development of this machine, insofar as it explains the version I've elected to model.  As best I can ascertain from various references, there were actually a few phases of development in the very short life of the Crusader, as outlined here. I've commented on distinguishing changing features & availability of reference images:

 

Phase 1:

The initial build as flown on first test flight. Wooden propeller; rounded cut-out (fixed?) cockpit opening; royal blue float struts; bracing & strut connections at floats not faired in.  This is closest to the kit version OOB.  There are a few images from this time, collected here:

 

http://i1079.photobucket.com/albums/w519/greggles_w/Crusader%20Phase%201/1_G_zpsnn3z9hzp.jpg

 

Phase 2:

In response to test pilot complaints, the rudder was enlarged. I've not identified any images of this version. Perhaps due to the fact that it was short-lived: on the same pilot's advice after testing the modified tail ... the rudder was returned to the original design!

 

Phase 3:

At the end of the above (brief) test phase the aircraft suffered a rough landing, sustaining damage to the float struts. The Crusader was repaired and reconfigured slightly: metal propeller; modified engine air intake; straight edged cockpit opening with fold down door(s?); white float struts; all strut & bracing connections to floats were now faired in neatly.  This is the version which was rolled out & run-up (but not flown) for the press in August 1927.  Consequently there's a lot of reference material from this moment, including this in Flight:

 

https://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1927/1927%20-%200624.html?search=short crusader

 

This by Pathe:

 

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/racing-seaplanes-the-last-word/query/Crusade

 

And many more images besides. Generally the images you turn up in a web-search for the Crusader are from this time. Interestingly in all the images the cylinder cowlings are removed, and there is definitely a sense that the press outing interrupted feverish activity in the workshop - note the grime in panel joints around the engine.

 

Phase 4:

This is the moment in time I have chosen to model: just before departure for Venice. I only recently discovered a wonderful set of Royal Aeronautical Society photos, including this cracker:

4_1_zpsvhhhthq9

More available here:

 

https://yooniqimages.com/images/Search?q=Felixstowe Bristow Crusader&searchfrom=detail&searchType=Creative

 

Looks great huh!?

 

This represents the peak development of this machine, fully assembled with all cylinder cowls fitted, and proudly cleaned and polished for presentation before departure. In addition to the cumulative changes above, by this time the new metal spinner appears to have been painted white.

 

Phase 5:

Venice. Tragic incompetence sees aileron control cables crossed when reassembled.  Crash & then salvage.  Interestingly I have come across three images of the salvage, which will actually prove surprisingly useful as they include the only image I have found which show the underwing surface oil cooler panels. Available here for those with an interest in the macabre:

 

5_1_zpsalddq3fa

 

5_2_zpsdzjxphkn

 

5_3_zpshaeccqmh

 

That's my summary.

 

All very well - I hear you holler - show me the model!!  I ought to have said sooner: progress may be sporadic, due to 5yr old twins & all that entails ... but if you can bear with me I'd greatly appreciate your company & advice along the way!

 

g.

Edited by greggles.w
Farewell Photobucket!
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

So the first output: a scratch built cowling.

 

Here is the kit part, which I haven't bothered to remove from its casting block:

 

L1080393_zpsnsxl5lse

 

& here is the real thing

 

cowl_zpstmx9fn9v

 

So it's actually a pretty good  likeness .. but with room for improvement!  To tackle this I'm breaking it into three parts: the cowl forward of the cylinders; then behind the cylinders; then the individual cylinder cowls themselves.

 

Starting with the cowl forward of the cylinders, which covers the gearbox.

 

The kit part here is a simple smooth cone, tapering mildly to meet a spinner which appears to have been modelled to suit the initial larger diameter wooden propeller (confirmed by the box art).  I'm aim to scratch build the cowl to suit the later definitive metal prop with its smaller spinner. The forward cowl was not a rounded cone but instead a tapering nine-sided faceted shape (nonagon?!) like so:

 

Cowl_2_zpsm33cs1jc

 

Here then are the first styrene parts & the Vector Mercury crankcase which will be at the core.  The trapezoidal cowl panels (1 missing in this photo I see now?!) were scribed on the back to let me fold the tabs up ...

 

 

L1080474_zps0yfo9ofl

 

Assembly in progress around the Vector engine .. A few of those tiny tabs separating along the way ..

 

L1080476_zpsv2jsugho

 

And all together! Still needs plenty of work, to sand, putty, prime etc, but for now it's together!  Time to stop to let the glue cure ..

 

L1080486_2_zpsunz5gozt

 

g.

Edited by greggles.w
Farewell Photobucket!
  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmmm, I've long avoided resin kits & the dollars they go for but that is looking more affordable plus, there is no way I can ever see this being done in plastic. I guess I'm becoming desensitised to paying what I used to think was way too much for a kit, so I might have to give this one a go. This thread with your great info will help with the task. I've got to say though, didn't the pilot's pre flight include checking control actions ????

Steve.

Edited by stevehnz
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

How the heck did I miss this? Following, no popcorn (the bits get stuck in me teefs.)

 

I may be tempted to buy a full resin kit now.

 

Re your comment about the incompetence - blame le pilote. He shoulda orta done his his preflight properly. Regardless of the cause, what a sad fate for a beautiful machine.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, stevehnz said:

 

Hmmmmm, I've long avoided resin kits

 

 

Well Steve, if it helps - you might like to know that this will be a first in resin for me too...

 

14 hours ago, stevehnz said:

I've got to say though, didn't the pilot's pre flight include checking control actions ????

 

.. apparently not! I believe preflight checks didn't exist - at least as a formal checklist - for another ten years or so. They were initiated after the crash of a B-17 prototype  mid 1930s I understand.

 

Red faces all round I would have thought .. & a hell of a fright for the pilot!  I agree with you Rob:

 

10 hours ago, Rob G said:

what a sad fate for a beautiful machine.

 

Had half an hour last night to invest in putty & sanding. No time for image update.  Next will be the rear cowl behind the cylinders.. when life allows ..

 

g.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello all,

 

So next up, the cowl behind the cylinders.  This is where the cowl transitions from the faceted forward cowl to the circular cross section of the fuselage behind.

 

Here's how I set out to tackle this: the image below (sorry for poor quality - steep learning curve there!) shows the parts cut from differing thicknesses of sheet styrene. Thicker for the disc, so it will hold the shape, & thin for the skin which will wrap around the disc.  On the right the forward cowl after a little putty & sanding.

 

L1080496-B_zps7vwtxnpv

 

The 9x 'fingers' of the skin were to reach forward through between the cylinders to connect to the front cowl.  The plan (hope!) being they might suggest the paired piano hinges between the cylinders as shown here:

 

Cowl back_1_zpsfucepy39

 

It seems all the cowl components were 'sewn' together using these piano hinges ...

 

Well let me say this was one of those bright ideas which quickly proved fairly dim! Dreams of precision evaporated fairly quickly. I considered abandoning all work to date to start again .. but stuck with it.  Here it is once I finally managed to get it together ...

 

L1080521_B_zpsutnvloms

 

Those 'fingers' look pretty heavy handed & overly thick .. here it is again some time later after some painstaking work with needle files & sanding to try to thin them down:

 

L1080527_B_zps8sjqhfbv

 

 

L1080529_B_zpsaty4jg4x

 

.. hoping things will improve further with a coat of Mr White Surfacer primer & further sanding ...

 

More when I can ...

Edited by greggles.w
Farewell Photobucket!
  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Hello all,

 

Well as predicted, one of those illnesses that only primary schools can incubate swept over the family, so this project was put aside for a while.  I'm happy to report I have picked it up again!

 

Next on the cowling - yes still on the cowling - are the streamlined fairings which sit behind the cylinder heads, as seen here:

 

EB2_zpsmu65qowt

 

Seven of the nine cylinders had this fairing. The top cylinder was instead faired back to the cockpit.  Another, as can be seen above, was without a fairing as it would have fouled the air intake scoop just above the wing root.

 

There is limited imagery of the rear of these fairings, but what is available shows a small opening at the end of the fairing, suggesting a flow-through of air for cooling:

 

EB3_zps8mqhcfeg

 

EB4_zps1gxfe4vc

 

This ruled out shaping this fairing from a solid.  So I decided the best way to scratch build these would be to 'smash-mould' them ... a first for me!

 

I shaped up a master on the end of a stick of balsa, coated it in super glue, lit the tea-light candle then got underway.  Much trial & error!!  In the end 0.5mm sheet seems to have worked.  Several hours later, here were the resulting parts:

 

EB1A_zpsr5edtnts

 

The seven 'best' (a relative term!) selected are shown above.  Many more duds preceded them!!

 

Here they are going on.  I temporarily set the cowling up at the end of the fuselage to set alignment:

 

EB1B_zpshuynl6ja

 

And again from the front ...

 

EB1C_zpsusbl2ha2

 

And with one to go ...

 

EB1D_zpszy3drogl

 

And here the subassembly as it currently stands:

 

EB1E_zpshpw6zjdf

 

EB1F_zps8lknsbnb

 

The results are not perfect by any measure, and there's quite some clean up to do, but it was so satisfying to have a go at something new!

 

Thanks for looking, any & all comments or advice appreciated,

 

g.

Edited by greggles.w
Farewell Photobucket!
  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, greggles.w said:

 

Thanks Ian,

 

Was that project posted here?

 It was.

It was the Merlin Fokker D.I and D.II double build. I crash moulded the little cheek fairings on the D.II

http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235002312-fokker-di-dii-double-build-merlin-172finished/#comment-2355606

 

Ian

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work on those cylinder fairings! I've always loved the look of this aeroplane. I think I like it because of that big, brutish radial instead of all those perfectly-streamlined inlines you normally see on the Schneider racers.

 

Regards,

 

Jason

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, limeypilot said:

It was the Merlin Fokker D.I and D.II double build. I crash moulded the little cheek fairings on the D.II

 

.. Great thread Ian! Found the crash mouldings, very nice.

 

You certainly were dealt a much poorer hand with those kits! I'm much better served with this Karaya base kit.

 

Will enjoy reading back over that thread.

 

g.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎20‎/‎11‎/‎2016 at 4:14 AM, Learstang said:

 

Nice work on those cylinder fairings! I've always loved the look of this aeroplane. I think I like it because of that big, brutish radial instead of all those perfectly-streamlined inlines you normally see on the Schneider racers.

 

 

 

Thanks Jason.  I must confess the Crusader is a relatively new discovery for me.  I had set out on the task of sourcing 1/48 kits of those 'perfectly streamlined inlines '.  Unfortunately this is not easy as so few have been modelled, and many of those which have been are long out of production.  Then I came across this Crusader kit, which is still in production.  So I bought it as something of a 'practice hack' to warm up on, thinking I could source a replacement easy enough it all went wrong.  But once I started on research I quickly came to appreciate this machine.  Now I'm genuinely keen to model it as well as I can to do the design justice.

 

Have you seen the French contemporary radial floatplane racer, the HV40?:

 

image_zpsneopou73

 

A little more brutish again than the Crusader.  Alas, again, no kit - in any scale - that I know of ...

 

g.

Edited by greggles.w
Farewell Photobucket!
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...