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Homebee

1/48 - North American P-51D & Mustang lV/P-51K by Airfix - released - new P-51D "fillet less" released

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When will Airfix make an Dooleybird in 1/72?

 

Or a kit with the markings of the first P-51D kit from Airfix?

 

Cheers / André

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Assuming you mean the 1958 Mustang, kit 1405, then you don't need to wait for Airfix: the markings for Fool's Paradise IV are available in 1/72 on an Xtradecal set. I strongly doubt that Airfix will release those markings again though, as properly you require a fillet-less early P-51D kit and therefore they'd have to re-tool the fuselage halves. Of course if you use after-market decals it's not a big job to remove the fillet in 1/72.

 

Old Thumper did a nostalgia build of the original kit on here a couple of years ago: 

 

There seems to be a shortage of reliable 1/72 decals for KM272 Dooley Bird at the moment and that would be welcome from Airfix or any other mainstream supplier. I'm pretty sure Kits World used to do it: they certainly did in 1/48, but it's long out of production.  

Edited by Work In Progress

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22 hours ago, Work In Progress said:

Assuming you mean the 1958 Mustang, kit 1405, then you don't need to wait for Airfix: the markings for Fool's Paradise IV are available in 1/72 on an Xtradecal set. I strongly doubt that Airfix will release those markings again though, as properly you require a fillet-less early P-51D kit and therefore they'd have to re-tool the fuselage halves. Of course if you use after-market decals it's not a big job to remove the fillet in 1/72.

 

Old Thumper did a nostalgia build of the original kit on here a couple of years ago: 

 

There seems to be a shortage of reliable 1/72 decals for KM272 Dooley Bird at the moment and that would be welcome from Airfix or any other mainstream supplier. I'm pretty sure Kits World used to do it: they certainly did in 1/48, but it's long out of production.  

Yes, the 1958 Airfix kit...

 

I built the latest Airfix kit a while ago with the decals from the old Revell kit (Cockie) and it was then I've found out about the decals from Xtradecals.

 

It's sad that the last Airfix kit doesn't have the filletles P-51D as choise (as the Heller has). But this give eduard possibillities when/if they comes up with an 1/72 P-51D.

 

Cheers / André

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I've just been looking at Gordon Leith's blog on the RAF Museum website.  It would appear that Flt Lt Doley also flew KH655/QV-P, illustrated with a photo at https://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/blog/dooleybird-mustang-pilots-logbook-donation/.  I've previously seen this photo in a book on the Mustang by Bill Gunston.  That aircraft appears to have  had the louvres and a Hamilton Standard propeller, going by the shape of the prop blur at the spinner.  I grabbed the P-51K boxing from Mark's Models in Dublin the other day and it appears to allow any configuration of a fillet-tailed P-51D to be modelled, so KH655 is a possibility if you can find the code and serial lettering.

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Source: https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/news/workbench/mustang-gets-new-parts-and-exclusive-canberra-announcement

Quote

Mustang gets new parts - Redesigning a fighting classic

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A computer rendered image produced during the development of the 1/48th scale P-51D Mustang kit, which shows just how different the earliest examples of this variant looked from the majority of the production run

 

With its reputation as one of the most famous aircraft of all time and one which made a dramatic impact on the air battles of the Second World War, the North American P-51 Mustang has become an enduring source of fascination for modellers and enthusiasts all over the world. Its popularity is undoubtedly due in no small part to the impressive combat record the aircraft posted despite being introduced relatively late in WWII, but is also due to the fact that this is simply one of the most attractive fighting aeroplanes ever produced, made all the more aesthetically pleasing by the flamboyant markings which were often applied by their American pilots and ground crews. Despite the Mustang’s reputation as being an American classic, it owes much to the influence Britain had on the aircraft’s development, from the initial decision to allow this new company to build their own P-40 beater, to modifications made in the field which made the aircraft a more effective fighting aeroplane, influence which also included pairing the Mustang with the Rolls Royce Merlin engine which powered the RAF’s Spitfires and Hurricanes. The Mustang was very much an Anglicized American classic.

 

The first Mustangs to enter service during WWII were the Allison engined Mustang I’s of the Royal Air Force at the beginning of 1942, aircraft which proved to be a vast improvement on the Lysanders and Tomahawks No.26 Squadron had been flying previously, but aircraft which were restricted to low level attack and reconnaissance duties, due to the aircraft’s disappointing medium and high altitude performance. The decision to re-engine the Mustang airframe with the successful Rolls Royce Merlin engine proved to be a revelation and turned a good aeroplane into a world beater - incredibly, this new combination propelled the Mustang to 441mph at 29,800ft, which was approximately 100mph faster than the Allison powered P-51A at the same altitude. The Mustang had just come of age! This combination of technologies was one which would eventually allow Allied air forces to go on the aerial offensive, protecting bombers all the way to and from their targets and hunting the Luftwaffe over their own bases.

 

The Merlin powered P-51B/C Mustang started to arrive in the UK during November 1943, equipping US fighter units engaged in battles with the Luftwaffe over enemy occupied Europe and Germany. These aircraft were fitted with a birdcage type canopy which was hinged on the port side of the aircraft, with its top section folding open (hinged to the starboard) to allow the pilot access and egress. Although the aircraft possessed stellar performance, the canopy design was less than ideal, being slightly clumsy to use and restricting pilot visibility somewhat – it was also rather snug around the pilots head and on a long mission, could prove rather uncomfortable, an aspect of the aircraft’s design which would once again benefit from British intervention. In service with the RAF as the Mustang III, this hinged canopy was deemed unsuitable for combat operations over Europe and a fairly complex modification was applied to British Mustangs, replacing this canopy with a sliding alternative, which utilised a single, bulged, frameless canopy design which became known as the 'Malcolm Hood'. This excellent modification was later applied to many USAAF Mustangs, with many pilots describing the ‘Malcolm Hood’ equipped P-51Bs and Cs as the definitive fighting variant of the Mustang, despite the fact that it had less guns than later versions – a true pilots aeroplane.

 

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The release of this early P-51D without the dorsal tail fillet will allow modellers to replicate some of the most famous fighting aircraft of the Second World War

 

Arguably, the finest example of a WWII fighting aeroplane arrived with the introduction of the ‘D’ variant of the Mustang, the most heavily produced version of the aircraft and one which addressed a number of perceived shortcomings of the earlier versions. Despite the fact that razorback B and C model Mustangs were excellent fighters, they did have problems with poor general visibility from their birdcage canopy and guns which had a tendency to jam during combat, both of which hampered its performance as a premier fighting aeroplane. The ‘D’ model addressed both of these issues, redesigning the rear fuselage to allow the adoption of a large, single piece Plexiglas teardrop canopy which offered excellent all-round visibility and a redesigned wing which housed six .50 calibre machine-guns, which were mounted upright and thus greatly minimized the ammunition jamming issue. The improvements also included the addition of a superb gun-sight, one which would prove to be one of the most effective to be fitted to any WWII fighter, and part of an upgrade combination which made the already impressive Mustang into a war winner.

 

Beginning to appear on airfields during the summer of 1944, the P-51D would allow the Mustang to build on earlier operational successes and provide pilots with a fighter that was capable of hunting the Luftwaffe to destruction. Mustang pilots interviewed after the war described how they knew the Mustang was a special aeroplane as soon as they sat in one – ‘it just felt right’. Featuring a two stage, twin speed supercharger, the aircraft was equally at home defending USAAF bombers at altitude, as it was down on the deck looking for targets of opportunity. Famous USAAF ace Bud Anderson said that best of all, “It went like hell”. From a German perspective, it has been said that Hermann Goering reputedly proclaimed that he knew the war was lost when he saw USAAF Mustangs flying low over Berlin – with the Luftwaffe struggling to replace their spiralling losses, the Allies continued to introduce even more capable aircraft.

 

Distinctive omission features on new Airfix Mustang kit

 

d_new_airfix_early_north_american_p51d_m

An iconic WWII image. The Bottisham Four features three early P-51D Mustangs, two of which do not have the dorsal fin fillet kit applied, giving the aircraft a very different profile

 

As one of the most popular post war modelling subjects, the North American Mustang is familiar to a great many people and continues to inspire millions of kit build projects every year. The Mustang has several design characteristics which are both interesting and slightly confusing for the modeller tackling this subject for the very first time, details which require a little prior research if you are to have confidence with your build. Mustang aficionados will tell you that some of these details can have a dramatic impact on the appearance of the aircraft and may result in your Mustang looking quite different in the space of just 30 minutes. On returning from flight operations, most P-51Ds would have fully pressurised hydraulic systems and as the engine stopped, the main gear doors and flaps remained in their retracted positions, giving the aircraft a particularly clean appearance. As the hydraulic pressure began to drop, or if the pressure was intentionally released from the system, the inner (closed) undercarriage doors would slowly drop down to a point where the returning ‘clean’ aircraft looked completely different with fully lowered gear doors. Wartime photographs provide plenty of evidence for modellers, as well as the reassurance that there are so many pictures showing Mustangs with various levels of door ‘bleed down’ (and indeed flap position) that you really can’t go wrong with whichever configuration you decide to finish your model.

 

Even more interesting than this, early P-51D Mustangs were delivered with the distinctive new thinner rear fuselage and bubble canopy, producing what is usually considered the definitive profile for a Mustang. In the famous picture above, which features the ‘Bottisham Four’, you will notice that three of the Mustangs have rear fuselage sections which remain straight until it meets the aircraft’s tail, whilst the second P-51D has a much thicker section just forward of the tail – is this a different variant of the Mustang, or is there another explanation. The answer is quite simply a ‘Tail Fillet’, or to give it its correct title, a field fitted dorsal fin fillet kit (in the first instance, at least). Quite a radical redesign of the B/C variant of the Mustang, the ‘D’ model introduced a larger wing area, bubble canopy and reduced rear fuselage profile and whilst still aerodynamically sound, it did slightly alter the handling characteristics of the aircraft. In actual fact, the Mustang had developed some handling problems when the airframe had been mated with the Rolls Royce Merlin engine, with the increased power from the unit meaning that an unwary pilot could find his aircraft entering an involuntary snap roll under certain conditions when at low speed, something which would usually have disastrous consequences.

 

e_new_airfix_early_north_american_p51d_m

The fourth release from this hugely popular tooling will include an additional component frame to allow this important version of the P-51D Mustang to be built – it looks so different from later aircraft which featured the dorsal tail fillet

 

Although a pre-existing Mustang trait, the situation may have been exacerbated by the ‘D’ redesign and a solution had to be found. That solution was to retro fit the new Mustangs with a dorsal fillet stabiliser extension to the tail, sweeping forwards towards the radio mast. Initially, this modification was fabricated for fitting ‘in the field’, with ground units retrofitting the fillet to existing P-51Ds, but would later be incorporated as standard on all new K and H models. As can be seen in the ‘Bottisham Four’ picture above, the fitting of this modification was not an overnight task and Mustangs went to war in both configurations – delightfully confusing for the modeller, the same Mustang could have been on operations both with and without the addition of the tail fillet. It was reported that a merchant ship carrying hundreds of the dorsal fin extensions was sunk en-route by a German U-boat, which delayed their adoption by USAAF units and even forced some to produce their own kits locally.

 

Another fascinating feature of the enduring P-51 Mustang legacy, the latest release from our magnificent 1/48th scale tooling A05138 includes an additional component frame which allows the distinctive early version of the P-51D to be modelled, the one without the addition of the more common tail fillet. These earlier aircraft look very different from the majority of ‘D’ variant Mustangs (which went on to be the most heavily produced variant of this famous fighter) and this new kit will allow some very famous Mustangs to be modelled, some of which have great historic significance.

 

Mustang scheme A – North American P51D-5-NA Mustang 44-13410/E2-C ‘Lou IV’

 

f_new_airfix_early_north_american_p51d_m

g_new_airfix_early_north_american_p51d_m

 

Full details: North American P51D-5-NA Mustang 44-13410/E2-C ‘Lou IV’, flown by Colonel Thomas Jonathan Jackson Christian Jr., 375th Fighter Squadron, 361st Fighter Group, 8th Air Force, USAAF, Air Force Station F-374 (RAF Bottisham), Cambridgeshire, England, July 1944.

 

The two scheme options which will accompany the release of this new kit depict two of the most famous aircraft of the Second World War and underline why the Mustang continues to be such a fascinating subject for modellers. By the time Thomas Jonathan Jackson Christian Jr. arrived in Europe, he was already one of the most experienced combat pilots in the USAAF and an accomplished leader of men. The great grandson of famous Confederate Civil War general ‘Stonewall Jackson’, Christian graduated from West Point and initially embarked on a career in the US Army Field Artillery, only to reverse this decision soon afterwards, applying to train as a pilot with the Army Air Corps. Blessed with exceptional flying skill, on gaining his wings he was posted to the basic flying school facility at Randolph Field in Texas, but a desire to fly operationally would see him transferring to a bomber group, where he would fly the B-18 and B-17 from bases in the Philippines. Continuing to fill his logbook with an impressive list of aircraft types flown and hours in the air, Thomas Christian was reassigned to a fighter unit and spent time ferrying P-40 fighters in the Australasian region and was shot down on one such mission, officially posted as MIA and presumed lost – he actually survived the incident. Living in the jungle with the support of local people and eventually returning to his home station.

 

After spending time flying the Bell P-400 Airacobra from Guadalcanal, Christian returned to the US, where he would marry his sweetheart and take command of the newly formed 361st Fighter Group in Richmond, Virginia – nicknamed the ‘Yellow Jackets’, pilots of the 361st were trained to fly the mighty P-47 Thunderbolt, one of the heaviest and most powerful fighters of the Second World War. In November 1943, the 361st FG were posted to Britain and set sail aboard the liner Queen Mary, arriving on the Clyde on 29th of the month, immediately transiting for their new home base at Bottisham in Cambridgeshire. Their new Thunderbolts were waiting for them and following a period of training and familiarisation, the unit took their mighty fighters into combat with the Luftwaffe. The unit converted from P-47s to Mustangs in May 1944 and would be heavily involved in actions supporting D-Day and the liberation of Europe.

 

h_new_airfix_early_north_american_p51d_m

Colonel Thomas JJ Christian Jr. flying his distinctive P-51D Mustang, images of which would go on to be widely published and making this one of the most famous aircraft of WWII

 

In the skies above Bottisham airfield on the 26th July 1944, four Mustang fighters of the 375th Fighter Squadron/ 361st Fighter Group formed up on the starboard side of a Boeing B-17 camera ship for a series of colour images which would go on to become some of the most widely published images of the war and synonymous with USAAF operations during WWII. The images features four yellow nosed Mustang fighters and would go on to be referred to as the ‘Bottisham Four’. Each of the Mustangs were fitted with long range fuel tanks and appear to be embarking on their latest bomber escort mission – they also represent several variants of the Mustang, with one razorback P-51B, two early P-51D fighters without the dorsal fin fillet extension fitted and one with the tail modification addition. The lead aircraft, 44-13410/E2-C was the personal mount of Group Commander Col. Thomas JJ Christian Jr., a highly decorated aviator and national hero – his Mustang is thought to be one of the most famous and heavily photographed Mustangs of the Second World War.

 

Christian’s Mustang was named ‘LOU IV’ after his daughter Lou Ellen, who had been born in Dallas in January 1944. This name was carried on the port side of the forward fuselage, with the starboard side displaying the name ATHELENE, which is thought to have been the name of the wife or girlfriend of the aircraft’s crew chief, S/Sgt. D Jameson’s. This Mustang is interesting for a multitude of reasons, not least of which is the fact that it features the much more promonent full yellow nose of the 361st, markings which would be applied to the rest of the group’s Mustangs during August. ‘LOU IV/ATHELENE’ also has its top D-Day identification markings overpainted using a lighter shade of olive drab on both the wings and horizontal stabilisers, making this an extremely attractive aircraft.

Highlighting the savage nature of air combat operations in the European Theatre, none of these aircraft would survive the war and indeed three would be destroyed within 7 weeks of the famous ‘Bottisham Four’ pictures being taken, with two of the pilots tragically making the ultimate wartime sacrifice. Col Thomas JJ Christian Jr. would be killed whilst flying his famous Mustang ‘LOU IV’ on 12th August 1944, on a mission to support a large 8th Air Force raid against targets in northern and central France. He was last seen leading a bombing attack against the railway marshalling yards at Boisleux au Mont, just south of Arras, with some eyewitness reports claiming a yellow nosed Mustang lost a wing and crashed whilst making its attack run. Although Christian had not been credited with any aerial victories, he was an exceptional leader with more than 70 combat missions over Europe to his name and had been the recipient of several decorations for valour. His Mustang ‘Lou IV’ did have two Luftwaffe fighters to its name, but whilst the aircraft was being flown by other pilots.

 

Mustang scheme B – North American P51D-5-NA Mustang 44-13321/HO-P ‘Cripes A Mighty 3rd’

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Full details: North American P51D-5-NA Mustang 44-13321/HO-P ‘Cripes A Mighty 3rd’, flown by Major George Earl Preddy Jr. 328th Fighter Squadron, 352nd Fighter Group, 8th Air Force, USAAF, Bodney airfield, Norfolk, England, 6th August 1944.

 

Already an accomplished pilot before he enlisted in the US Army Air Corps, George Preddy had no trouble in graduating from flying school and was posted to fly the Curtis P-40 fighter against the Japanese in northern Australia. During six months of training and combat flying with the 9th Pursuit Squadron, 49th Pursuit Group, he was credited with damaging two enemy aircraft, before being involved in a serious mid-air collision with another P-40 fighter. After a lengthy period of hospitalisation, Preddy was posted back to the US, where he converted to the twin engined Lockheed P-38 Lightning, however, fearing his future may be spent stateside and he may miss all the action, he enlisted the help of an influential former squadron mate, who pulled a few strings and arranged a posting to a unit which would become the 352nd Fighter Group.

 

The name George Preddy is now inextricably linked to flying the North American P-51 Mustang and despite the fact that he would score his first three European combat victories whilst flying the mighty P-47 Thunderbolt, it would be the Mustang which propelled Preddy to aviation recognition. The 352nd Fighter Group converted to the Mustang in April 1944, initially with the Razorback P-51B and later to the definitive ‘D’ variant – all of George Preddy’s aircraft were named ‘Cripes A’ Mighty’, with his first Mustang being Cripes 2nd and his first ‘D’ being Cripes 3rd. Strangely, his final Mustang reverted back to the original ‘Cripes A’ Mighty’ name carried by his Thunderbolt, rather than being named Cripes IV. Using this combination of three Mustangs, Preddy would dramatically increase his victory tally and eventually be credited with 23.83 victories in his three P-51s, more than any other Mustang pilot during WWII. This impressive tally included ‘Six in a Day’, which occurred on 6th August 1944, when he dispatched six Bf 109 fighters in a frantic few minutes combat, a flight he had completed whilst nursing a serious hangover from a party the night before (it does have to be stressed that operations had previously been cancelled and many of the groups pilots had decided to let their hair down a little).

 

Following a period of rest and recuperation back home in the states, Preddy returned to the ETO in October 1944 as the Commanding Officer of the Bodney based 328th Fighter Squadron. In support of operations during the Battle of the Bulge, the squadron was deployed to a forward operating airfield in Belgium during December 1944 and on Christmas Day, Preddy would lead a flight of 10 Mustangs on a patrol over the region. Vectored to a gaggle of Luftwaffe fighters, he shot down a further two Messerschmitt Bf 109s, however, the combat scattered his group over a wide area and he became separated with his wingman. Sent to intercept more enemy fighters over Liege, he spotted an FW190 at low altitude and swooped in for another potential victory – at high speed and flying at tree-top height, his aircraft was accidentally hit by ground anti-aircraft fire from a friendly unit. Unable to get out of the stricken Mustang, George Preddy did manage to slide the canopy back before it impacted the ground, however, it is thought that he had probably sustained a mortal wound from the quad anti-aircraft gun and died before the aircraft crashed.

 

l_new_airfix_early_north_american_p51d_m

Top Mustang ace George Preddy in his famous Mustang ‘Cripes A’ Mighty 3rd, clearly suggesting to the photographer that he had just increased his already impressive victory tally by a further four enemy aircraft

 

Described by his commanding officer as ‘a man of intense desire to excel’ and ‘the complete fighter pilot’, George Preddy was one of the most accomplished Allied fighter pilots of WWII and whilst clearly open to much discussion, would probably have gone on to become the most successful Allied fighter pilot of WWII, had he not chased that Focke Wulf FW190 over Allied lines on Christmas Day 1944. He was ultimately credited with 26.83 aerial victories and 5 ground victories, with 23.83 of these being gained whilst flying the North American Mustang, making him the most prolific Mustang ace of the Second World War. In the years which followed the end of WWII, Preddy’s former squadron mates claimed that his actual score was significantly in advance of this official mark and there were many incidents where he simply did not claim a victory, or was involved in the shared destruction of an aircraft – his driving force was simply to be the best fighter pilot he could be.

 

The release of this new early North American P-51D Mustang kit A05138 and its straight back configuration marks an important stage in the development of this famous fighting aeroplane and will allow the modeller to produce some of the most distinctive Mustangs of the European Theatre. Having looked at both of the scheme options which will be offered with the release of this kit in some detail, it will be a particularly difficult choice for us all in deciding which of these two iconic aircraft to model – both are extremely famous Mustangs and both unbelievable attractive in their own right. Perhaps more than any other modelling project, there is certainly a strong case for a dual Mustang build here, as both schemes are absolute classics. With a scheduled Autumn release, we look forward to bringing you confirmation of the box artwork in the very near future.

 

 

- ref. A05138 - North American P51D Mustang "Filet less"

https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/AX05138

https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/shop/new-arrivals/north-american-p51-d-mustang-filletless-tails-1-48.html

 

AX05138_3.jpg?t=1575478613

 

V.P.

Edited by Homebee

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 I must say, these Airfix website pieces are getting more and more grossly over-written. That would have been better edited down to half the word count.

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6 hours ago, AlCZ said:

This is a little shame - when Eduard released their complet new tool Mustang with brand new filet less fuselage, Airfix must make the same sub version. But, sorry "Fix" Eduard´s offering is better - superb surface details with rivets, new tool fuselage part (look at HS on Brett´s review - angle over tail is different between filet and filet less version, and Eduard have P.E. parts and more decal versions - one with pin up girl :).  I understand, Airfix have moulds for their kit, so make a little upgrade (or addon)... I have both kits, Eduard and Airfix, and Eduard is simple better and nicest.

I don't know who did Airfix's tooling, but it's a real shame when things turn out like this. It looks like early Trumpeter offerings when they had all those heavy deep rivets.:hmmm:

 

editor-161113-582884f469922.jpeg&f=1&nof

 

Meng's snap together kit is not far behind in surface detail and the wheel well and cockpit details are also lacking.

 

When Eduard releases their Weekend Editions, which will be about the same price as the Airfix kit, the choice will be easy - get the Eduard kit.

 

Sorry to say this, but in the end it's capitalism. 

 

I do have Airfix's P-40CU and it's the best 1/48 Tomahawk on the market . . . for now.

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Please can we keep this thread to the Airfix kit, not Meng, Eduard etc.

 

Julien

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I wonder if this kit comes with a separate sprue with the new tail parts and yet retains the later tail parts too?

 

I think it´s utterly idiotic by some model companies (no names here!) to nip a part or two off a new release just to make it a different one. The number of modellers using aftermarket decals is in my opinion large enough to support leaving all the parts in every boxing. Thus such a modeller looking for, say, an Airfix P-51D with a tail fin fillet and entering her/his local hobby shop or favourite webshop could pick up any boxing available, regardless of the decal options supplied with the kit, if it just contains the plastics she/he is after. Otherwise there´s a risk that kit will remain on that shelf, unsold, just for lack of one or two parts. I know many hobby shop owners agree with me. 

 

Ugh! V-P   

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31 minutes ago, zigster said:

Maybe I'm "a weirdo one", yet I'd rather see a Beaufort.

You’re definitely not alone. 
Cheers.. Dave (fellow weirdo!) 

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33 minutes ago, zigster said:

Maybe I'm "a weirdo one", yet I'd rather see a Beaufort.

Not a weirdo...  

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Gentlemen, I started to feel better after your answers :-))

When they (Airfix) sell packedloads to the local funboys wielding their hairysticks and tins of Humbrols... maybe...one day?

As far, as I'm concerned - don't give a hoot about their Mustang.

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Isnt it just squeezing the most out of the tool? We've had the fillet D USAAF, and RAF and presumably this is the final boxing so its likely they have produced less in this run than the intial release to grab the collectors and completists?

 

TT

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I'm quite sure one of these new Airfix Mustangs will be my first aircraft kit in 1:48. It competes for the position with a HK Models B-17G...

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17 hours ago, Stephen said:

 

I didn't think I was interested in another Mustang either.  

 

Until I saw the fantastic box art for this latest version. Oh dear...

 

Nothing's changed in 40 years!

 

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, IanC said:

 

I didn't think I was interested in another Mustang either.  

 

Until I saw the fantastic box art for this latest version. Oh dear...

 

Nothing's changed in 40 years!

 

 

 

 

I totally agree😁

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I’ll have one, need a fillet-less for Horse’s Itch that Mal Mayfield made mask for me for. Looking forward to it.

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4 hours ago, TEXANTOMCAT said:

Isnt it just squeezing the most out of the tool? We've had the fillet D USAAF, and RAF and presumably this is the final boxing so its likely they have produced less in this run than the intial release to grab the collectors and completists?

 

TT

With Hornby Hobbies poor financial performance [see elsewhere in rumourmonger] I would imagine they would need to squeeze every last penny out of any newly tooled kit produced to recover R+D costs

I am no fan of the fillet less tail mustangs, but as said by another poster the box art does look rather nice and I could be tempted by one of these

I have at least one example of each of the previous boxings of Airfix's latest mustang

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1 hour ago, Acinonyx Jubatus said:

I am no fan of the fillet less tail mustangs

Ironically i go the other way on that thought. Ive built 25+ mustangs since 1979 all with the fillet. Except those I've modified into Reno pylon birds or B’s/C’s. I have been waiting for a Fillet-less version for most of that time. And am happy as a jaybird that there are now at least two out there i can pick from. 

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