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Homebee

1/48 - North American P-51D & Mustang lV by Airfix - released - F-51D release February 2019

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2 hours ago, Tbolt said:

No one is talking about 100% accuracy - we are talking about what looks like poor tooling. I suspect the CAD has been done well they are just not getting what they were after on the final product. Some of Airfix kits have been great, this one just seems to be let down a little. Sure they are not big problems just a little bit disappointing when everything about their kits are getting better.

 

I think you're perfectly right there. It's not a huge problem, and can be corrected or overlooked, but it's still disappointing.

 

It's the usual story with the new Airfix kits. They are brilliant in so many ways, but molding accuracy and consistency needs to be worked on.

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I think we are all focused on one part when critiquing Airfix's new P-51D.

 

One of the tails on Airfix's new Mustang has some problems with the rivets while the other one looks to be perfect.:idea::party:

 

P27%20P-51D%20Mustang%20Airfix-Dhm%20kit

 

there are some other little nit picks that are easily correctable like these

 

P46%20P-51D%20Mustang%20Airfix-Dhm%20kit

 

P61%20P-51D%20Mustang%20Airfix-Dhm%20kit

 

 

Now looking at the kit overall I think Airfix did a great job on their Mustang. In fact if given the choice of the Airfix kit or the Tamiya kit I'll choose the Airfix kit. I've built a few Tamiya Mustangs and they certainly have their drawbacks. (The canopy is the most glaring mistake, and just look at all the correction sets for it from Vector, Aires, and Ultracast: flaps, spinner, propeller blades, and wheel wells.)

 

I have to wait until the Airfix Mustang becomes available here, but from what I see I will be able to turn out a nice 1/48 P-51D without too much fuss. As for the curved fillet with the misplaced rivets - I'm sure Quickboost or Ultracast will offer a replacement for those who don't want to bother filling and re-scribing the part.

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Two new boxing/variants in 2018.

 

- ref. A05136 - North American F-51D Mustang

Expected in February 2019

  • Scheme 1: ‘Rotation Blues’ 67th FBS Korea
  • Scheme 2: F51D 77 Squadron RAAF Korea 1951
  • Scheme 3: J26 Mustang, Swedish Air Force

Source: https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/shop/new-for-2018/north-american-f51d-mustang-1-48.html

 

a05136-flat.jpg

 

A05136.1.jpg

 

- ref. A05137 - North American Mustang Mk.IV

Expected in December 2018

  • Scheme 1: KM272 ‘Dooleybird’ 19 Squadron RAF 1945
  • Scheme 2: KH676/CV-A Flg Off A F Lane, 3 Squadron RAAF Cervia Italy, April 1945

Source: https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/shop/new-for-2018/north-american-mustang-mk-iv-1-48.html

 

A05137.1.jpg

 

V.P.

Edited by Homebee

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Beautiful kit. Airfix has managed so far to pick all the markings that are totally uninteresting to me. Big success. Not that it matters though. 

 

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3 minutes ago, RHWinter said:

Me, I am so happy that there‘s going to be „Dooleybird“ for me: Thank you very much, Airfix!

Matchbox nostalgia, anyone?

And ditto...

 

Cheers,

 

S.

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So what’s with that reversed KM112 serial - is that right? 

 

Cheers.. Dave

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17 hours ago, Rabbit Leader said:

So what’s with that reversed KM112 serial - is that right? 

 

Cheers.. Dave

The Model Maker decals are designed to go with the recently published book out of the Stratus Publications stable of Polish Wings #23 - '303 Squadron North American Mustang' by Steve Brooking, Wojtek Matusiak and Piotr Sikora, with profile artwork by John Melson.  The book includes a lot of previously unpublished photos of Mustangs that were operated by No.303 Squadron and covers literally all the Mustang Mk.IVs operated by the Squadron.  The reversed 'mirror image' KM112 serial is supported by photos and is the result of most likely a "lost in translation" moment for the Polish groundcrew when the instructions for the painting of the large underwing serials post-war, were misinterpreted on this particular Mustang.

 

Regards,

 

 

 

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Source: https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/news/workbench/exclusive-airfix-caricature-competition-update

 

Quote

Caricature winner to be a ‘Mustang Jockey’

 

f_airfix_caricature_competition_f-51d_mu

We are pleased to bring Workbench readers this exclusive first look at the dramatic box artwork which will accompany the new F-51D Mustang and Aiden’s caricature instruction booklet debut

 

We are pleased to confirm that Aiden’s caricature pilot representation will be accompanying the forthcoming 1/48th scale release of A05136 North American F-51D Mustang, which will be supplied with three interesting scheme options for modellers to consider finishing their model. It is perhaps fitting that the Mustang was selected for our caricature competition subject as this is without doubt one of the most successful fighter aircraft of all time, which also went on to become a popular Airshow performer, allowing millions of enthusiasts to experience the thrill of a WWII Warbird in operation. Indeed, many of us often dream of winning a significant sum on the lottery and when that joyous day arrives, the purchase of a Warbird would quickly follow. Although we may have a particular liking for Spitfires or Messerschmitts, a Mustang would usually be viewed as the more sensible option for most and probably be the Warbird of choice for would-be lottery winners.

 

The Mustang proved to be one of the most successful aircraft of the Second World War and even though its wide-scale deployment only occurred during the final few months of the conflict, it allowed Allied pilots to wrestle a hard fought air superiority from their opposition in every theatre of operation in which it was used. Following the end of WWII, the USAAF selected the Mustang as their primary fighter aircraft, condemning most other types to either secondary support roles, or to the less auspicious fate of the scrap man’s torch. With the US Army Air Force becoming an independent service in 1947, some slight changes to the aircraft designation system it used were initiated the following year, with P for Pursuit being replaced with F for Fighter, thus turning the P-51D into the F-51D Mustang. The outbreak of the Korean War in 1950 saw Mustang Squadrons returning to combat once more, but this time in a strike/fighter-bomber capacity, where its celebrated attributes would be called upon again. The magnificent box artwork which will accompany the release of A05136 shows a pair of USAF Mustangs attacking marauding North Korean T-34 tanks on a mountain pass and whilst Aiden may not be flying the aircraft in this image, it is a particularly dramatic scene with which to announce the impending arrival of this new Mustang and it is a project with which he is certainly connected. Let’s take a closer look at the three scheme options included with the new kit.

 

 

g_airfix_caricature_competition_f-51d_mu

h_airfix_caricature_competition_f-51d_mu

North American F-51D Mustang 44-74625 ‘Rotation Blues’, 67th Fighter Bomber Squadron, 18th Fighter Bomber Group, USAF, Chinhae and Hoengsong Air Bases, South Korea, 1952/53.

 

By the time of the Korean War and the arrival of the jet age, the North American Mustang was deemed to be almost obsolete at a fighter, however its proven attributes of range, firepower and manoeuvrability dictated that it was much more suitable than the early US jets for strike missions from American bases in Japan. The urgency of the situation saw the Americans gathering as many suitable Mustang airframes together from home based units and loading them aboard USS Boxer for transportation to the Korean war zone. Once in theatre, the Mustangs were immediately pressed into action, attacking North Korean armoured columns and troop concentrations with a combination of machine guns, rockets, bombs and Napalm. The aircraft helped to stem the tide and played a pivotal role, but at a heavy price – the Mustang pilots were vulnerable to the accurate enemy anti-aircraft fire at these low altitudes and hundreds of aircraft would be lost in this manner during the conflict.

 

Unusually, the pilots of the 67th Fighter Bomber Squadron, US Air Force would be required to trade in their new Lockheed F-80 Shooting Star jet fighters for propeller driven F-51D Mustangs, as they prepared to take on North Korean forces in savage ground attack sorties. Operating from bases in South Korea, which were challenging at best and dangerous at times, the Mustangs were often required to fly several sorties a day, helping to stem the tide of North Korean forces which were flooding south. By the end of the war, these hard working Mustang pilots had flown tens of thousands of combat sorties over Korea. This particular Mustang 44-74625/FF-625 was used by many of the squadron’s pilots whilst it was stationed at the South Korean forward operating base at Hoengsong, many of whom had experience of flying Mustangs during the Second World War. The aircraft features the nose markings ‘ROTATION BLUES’ on the starboard side cowling, presumably after the record of the same name which was popular in the US at that time. The aircraft has been reported in various modelling publications as being fitted with a fixed tail wheel, possibly as a result of the often difficult operating conditions at its home airfield, not to mention the punishing daily mission schedules these Mustangs were required to fly. Following her USAF service, this aircraft remained in the region and was passed to the care of No.1 Squadron RoKAF, only to be destroyed in a crash during February 1954.

 

j_airfix_caricature_competition_f-51d_mu

k_airfix_caricature_competition_f-51d_mu

North American P-51D Mustang A68-720, No.77 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force, Pohang, South Korea, 1951.

 

Fighting side by side with the American’s from the early stages of the Korean War, the Mustangs of the Royal Australian Air Force were employed in similar strike operations against North Korean ground units, using guns, rockets, bombs and Napalm. Quickly earning the respect of US forces, the RAAF Mustangs were straight into the thick of the action, joining the Americans in combat just eight days after the war broke out and significantly, the first UN nation to do so. On constant alert, the Australian pilots were ready to respond to any request for support and often flew in the face of murderous anti-aircraft fire, which would be responsible for the deaths of several pilots.

 

Determined to make a difference, RAAF No.77 Squadron would often use two forward operating bases in Korea, hoping to reduce the turn-around time between flying offensive missions. This resulted in at least one Douglas Dakota being required to carry ammunition and general supplies between the bases, in what must have been particularly hazardous flights, often with nothing more than a CAC Wirraway training aircraft for escort and an extremely volatile cargo. Despite the impressive performance of the RAAF Mustangs, they were desperate to get their hands on the latest jet technology to make their strike sorties even more effective, with the North American Sabre being their aircraft of choice. Unfortunately, as the American’s were themselves re-equipping, there would be no chance of obtaining these fighters any time soon, so the RAAF settled for the Gloster Meteor. On 6th April 1951, No.77 Squadron flew their final Mustang sortie over Korea, before returning to Iwakuni Air Base in Japan the following day to begin their conversion to Meteors.

 

North American P-51D Mustang A68-720 was supplied to the Royal Australian Air Force having previously seen service with the USAAF. It initially served with No.82 (RAAF) Squadron in Japan, but on its return to Australia was transferred to No.77 Squadron. Seeing extensive service during the Korean war, the aircraft was forced to make an emergency landing at Pusan strip in March 1951 and despite being repaired, the Squadron’s conversion to Gloster Meteor jets saw it remain in storage in Japan. It was later gifted to the RoKAF and is presumed to have been either destroyed or reduced to spares later the following year. Marking a glorious chapter in Royal Australian Air Force history, this beautiful aircraft wears a natural metal finish, as well as a rather patriotic red, white and blue spinner – a really attractive option for Mustang fans looking for something a little different.

 

l_airfix_caricature_competition_j26_must

m_airfix_caricature_competition_j26_must

North American J-26 Mustang 26014, ‘Yellow 16’, 1st Squadron, F16 Wing, Svenska Flygvapnet (Swedish Air Force), Uppsala, Sweden, 1946.

 

Although Sweden maintained neutrality throughout the duration of the Second World War, the war raging around them ensured that they maintained significant forces to both protect their territory from incursion and prevent possible invasion by hostile forces. Although operating a relatively large air force, many of the fighter aircraft available to them were of inferior quality, such as the American Seversky P-35 (J-9 Swedish designation) and Italian Reggiane Re.2000 (J-12), with severe fuel shortages reducing the flying time of the few aircraft they managed to keep serviceable. New indigenous designs were already in development, however these would take time to enter service and the Swedish Air Force desperately needed a more capable fighter now.

 

As the intensity of air operations throughout Europe increased, so did the number of damaged and fuel starved aircraft landing on Swedish soil, thus becoming interned for the duration of the conflict. Amongst the aircraft falling into Swedish hands were at least ten examples of the North American Mustang, four of which were pressed into Swedish Air Force service – two razorback P-51Bs and two of the later P-51D variants, aircraft which were given the Swedish service designation J26. Having already made official requests to both Britain and America regarding the purchase of a modern fighter, Sweden had now turned their attentions to the Mustang, an aircraft which was generally regarded as one of the most capable aircraft of the war and possessed an excellent serviceability record. An agreement was signed in April 1945 and deliveries began almost immediately. The US built fighters were delivered to Bromma airfield by American pilots, who presented them to their new owners – the aircraft were quickly repainted with their national insignia and squadron markings, before being flown to their respective units around the country. The advent of the jet age resulted in the Swedish Mustangs quickly being relegated to secondary roles, following the purchase of British de Havilland Vampire fighters, with Sweden becoming a successful early operator of jet aircraft. The Mustangs were later sold to overseas operators, but would go on to provide many years of excellent service with the air forces of Israel, Dominican Republic and Nicaragua. In total, Sweden bought 165 Mustangs, four of which were the airworthy examples confiscated during the war.

 

n_airfix_caricature_competition_f-51d_mu

Full product box top layout, which will have us all reaching for this unusual model project, following its July release

 

It is difficult to apply any scheme on the thoroughbred Mustang and not still have it look absolutely spectacular and that is certainly the case with the relatively simple markings applied to Swedish Air Force Mustangs. There is just something appealing about the three gold crowns on the classic lines of the Mustang which make this such an appealing scheme choice for your latest Mustang modelling project. This No.1 Squadron fighter is coded ‘Red Lima’ and is from the F16 Wing at Uppsala air base, north of Stockholm and benefits from not one, but two examples of fuselage artwork. Under the port canopy framing, behind the exhaust panel is an emblem featuring a mounted Indian brave and lower down the cowling on the same side is the painting of a lady’s face, who is obviously called Carla. With three completely different and totally enthralling schemes to select from with the new kit, it is going to be a difficult choice deciding which one to add to our Mustang collections, not to mention this models undeniable attraction as the project which features our lucky 50th Anniversary edition caricature competition winner. Clearly a significant and discussion worthy addition to the Airfix range, North American F-51D Mustang A05136 is scheduled for a July release.

 

V.P.

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A couple of comments:

* '720 wasn't the only RAAF Mustang to carry the "patriotic" R/W/B spinner, all 77RAAF's aircraft in Korea had it. Coloured spinners were used for squadron identification on the RAAF's BCOF aircraft in Japan, and when 76 and 82 Sqns were sent home 77 Sqn took up the tri-coloured spinner as a combination of the colours used by the three BCOF squadrons. There's more detailed discussion of this at pp145-7 of Southern Cross Mustangs.

* There are problems with some of the markings as depicted in the pre-release artwork (e.g. the wrong lettering style in the serial), about which David Muir, Mr Southern Cross Mustangs, has been in touch with Airfix - hopefully the decal sheet as issued will deal with them.

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28 minutes ago, Boman said:

Thanks! 

Actually that is not correct.

 

the F51-D boxing contains an extra sprue with the correct propeller + rockets.

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28 minutes ago, snowen250 said:

Actually that is not correct.

 

the F51-D boxing contains an extra sprue with the correct propeller + rockets.

I thought that was the case but wasn't 100% - its what they did with their 1/72 P-51D and F-51D too 

 

TT

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On 10/03/2018 at 03:54, ColFord said:

The Model Maker decals are designed to go with the recently published book out of the Stratus Publications stable of Polish Wings #23 - '303 Squadron North American Mustang' by Steve Brooking, Wojtek Matusiak and Piotr Sikora, with profile artwork by John Melson.  The book includes a lot of previously unpublished photos of Mustangs that were operated by No.303 Squadron and covers literally all the Mustang Mk.IVs operated by the Squadron.  The reversed 'mirror image' KM112 serial is supported by photos and is the result of most likely a "lost in translation" moment for the Polish groundcrew when the instructions for the painting of the large underwing serials post-war, were misinterpreted on this particular Mustang.

 

Regards,

 

 

 

Stencil held wrong way probably. I have got the 48th decals in my decal box waiting for a decent kit or two. Had them for about 6 or so years now.

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Airfix have taken payment for my pre-ordered Mustang IV.

 

John

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