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sofiane1718

Airfix Me 262 A-1a Schwalbe 1/72 Released - New Boxing Me 262B-1a released

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On 5/13/2018 at 10:53 PM, Modelraynz said:

Got my kit recently - is it normal the fuselauge  wants to pop apart? As in takes some slight squeezing  to get the fuselauge pins interlocking, though i cant see visible warping, feels like CA will be necessary!

Hi!
Do they provide the different parts for both versions?

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Off the top of my head- im not sure!  But the L/R fuselauge halfs want to naturally twist slightly - dossnt affect shape or need correction just has the tendacy to 'pop' off!!

Edited by Modelraynz

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11 hours ago, Borisz said:

Hi!
Do they provide the different parts for both versions?

If you mean the 262A and two-seat B together, then no.

 

I've built the 262A and I was pleased with the result, but I had a number of fit issues. The fuselage went together ok, though.

 

I'm not sure I want to go through it all again with the 262B which comes out later in the year. Also I think it's very overpriced.

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Source:  https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/news/workbench/luftwaffe-mosquito-hunter-and-famous-lancaster-tribute

 

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Luftwaffe Mosquito hunter

Published 22/06/2018

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Welcome to this latest edition of Workbench and all the news, updates and exclusive announcements from the fascinating world of Airfix modelling. We are pleased that everyone seemed to enjoy our previous edition, which included more of the behind the scenes details regarding the recent announcement of our ‘Vintage Classics’ range and some of the exclusive images of the original artwork which will be used on many of these nostalgic releases. The feature also sparked some interesting debate on various modelling forums, with members posting their hopes for future model inclusions in this soon to be expanded range of classic kits and we are certainly looking forward to bringing you news of any additions as soon as we are in a position to do so.

The main subject of this latest edition brings us right up to date with the current Airfix model range and features an exclusive update from the highly anticipated new 1/72nd scale Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1 / Avia CS-92 kit, which features new parts and two fascinating scheme options in which to consider finishing your model. We will be bringing you an exclusive first look at the scheme decoration guides and a full description of the two scheme options which will be included with the release of A04062, as we head towards the scheduled October release for this extremely attractive new kit. We follow this up with a fascinating double build review from Australia, which features one of Britain’s most famous historic aircraft, but with both models wearing very different markings to the famous ones we are all now familiar with – if we tell you that the owners of this magnificent WWII bomber recently announced their intentions to return their aircraft to airworthy condition, you will have no trouble in identifying the subject of this particular feature. Let’s make a start straight away by heading back to the final days of the Luftwaffe and a ground-breaking aircraft which proved to be one of the most capable night hunters of WWII, but was very much a case of too little too late.

 

Night fighting enters the jet age

 

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A computer rendered image of the impending Messerschmitt Me 262 B-1a/U1 kit release

 

As one of the most advanced aircraft of the Second World War, the jet powered Messerschmitt Me 262 ‘Schwalbe’ has been a source of fascination for aviation enthusiasts and modellers alike in the years following the end of WWII. Representing the huge advances in aviation technology over a relatively short period of time, the Me 262 was the world’s first operational jet fighter and gave the Luftwaffe a significant advantage in the savage fighting taking place in the skies above Europe. Unfortunately, almost every aspect of the Me 262’s service introduction proved to be something of a wartime juxtaposition and even though it was undoubtedly an extremely advanced aeroplane, it had little chance of altering the outcome of the conflict, which had already turned inexorably in favour of the Allies. Representing highly advanced technology, Allied dominance dictated that not only would materials and fuel for the jet fighter be difficult to obtain, manufacturing would be seriously hampered by constant bombing and the roving eyes of reconnaissance aircraft searching for anything out of the ordinary. Its service introduction would be undertaken with Germany very much on the defensive and the propeller driven Allied fighters the Me 262 bettered in almost every aspect of performance would hunt the new jets mercilessly whilst on the ground and either taking off or landing, to ensure they never really had the opportunity to have an impact on the air war.

 

Significantly for the Luftwaffe, the ground-breaking powerplants which endowed the Messerschmitt Me 262 with its technological advantage proved also to be its Achilles heel and determined that this would always be a high maintenance aircraft, difficult to keep serviceable and incapable of being operated from anything but a large and fully equipped airfield. With an operational life which rarely exceeded twelve flying hours, Luftwaffe engineers had to become proficient at changing the Junkers Jumo engines and they would get plenty of practice - airfields playing host to the Messerschmitt jets were littered with engines in various states of repair and aircraft waiting to receive them. For this and numerous other reasons, the number of serviceable aircraft available at any one time would never be enough to cause serious concern to the Allied air forces, who by this time had gained a significant superiority in the skies above Europe.

 

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Cosford’s Messerschmitt Me 262 A-2a ‘Yellow 4’ continues to be one of the most popular museum exhibits in the country

 

Even though the Messerschmitt Me 262 had little chance of altering the course of the war, it nevertheless represents a significant leap forward in aviation technology and was undoubtedly one of the most capable fighting aircraft of WWII. Had Germany been able to develop the aircraft and its engines without disruption and had official interference not delayed its introduction as a high speed interceptor, large numbers of these fighters may have been operational much sooner than they eventually were and things may have been very different – thankfully that was not to be the case. The distinctive shark-like fuselage profile of the Messerschmitt Me 262 and its swept wings underlined the fact that this was a hunting aircraft built for speed and combined with its devastating firepower, its attacks in a combat situation would have been almost impervious to Allied defensive tactics. Avoiding being drawn into a turning dogfight, Me 262 pilots would simply fire and run, using its much superior speed both to outrun enemy fighters and to gain height for another attack on the bombers they were attempting to protect.

 

A Messerschmitt made for two

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More computer rendered goodness. The Me 262 B-1a/U1 is a very different looking model from the previously released single seat variant

 

The introduction of the Messerschmitt Me 262 in the late summer of 1944 presented the Luftwaffe with a weapon of significant potential, more capable than anything the Allies had available to them and therefore able to command a level of combat superiority. There were, however, many problems facing their effective operation, not least the fact that the first solo flight of a pilot converting to the ‘Schwalbe’ would be his first flight in a jet powered aircraft. This technology was significantly different from the famous Bf 109 and Focke Wulf piston engined fighters they had been flying previously and initially dictated that only the most accomplished pilots were selected for conversion to the new Messerschmitt jet fighter. Engine management and thrust input requests proved to be particularly challenging and if the aircraft was to achieve its full potential, it would have to be flown in great numbers and by regular squadron pilots, even novice replacements straight from flying school – a solution had to be found and quickly.

 

The answer proved to be as simple as it was ingenious – the Me 262 B-1a tandem two seat trainer. Retaining the nose armament of the fighter to make this a fully operational combat aircraft, the B-1a included a second cockpit for the instructor, positioned behind the student and requiring the removal of the rear fuel tanks and replacement with reduced capacity alternatives. A large and slightly bulbous looking dorsal fairing was fitted behind the second cockpit, which when combined with the lengthened canopy gave the appearance of a larger aeroplane – this is nothing more than an optical illusion, as no new built B-1a trainers were produced, they were all converted from standard single seat fighters taken from the production line. The aircraft was equipped with a fully functioning dual control flight system. The first Me 262 B-1a prototype made its first flight on 28th April 1944, with initial production examples reaching operational units by the following September, most destined for the Advanced Operation Conversion Wing 2 at Lechfeld. Approximately 70 B-1a trainers were produced before the end of the war, although their operational effectiveness was limited in the same way as the single seat fighters were, most noticeably by the poor service life of the Jumo jet engines.

 

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Rendered Messerschmitt walk-around. A further series of computer rendered images from the two-seat Messerschmitt Me 262 project

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Perhaps the most interesting of all the Messerschmitt Me 262 fighter variants were the B-1a/U1 ‘interim nightfighters’ developed from the standard two-seat trainers. The most obvious differences between the two variants are the adoption of the distinctive stag antler radar antenna of the Siemens FuG 218 Neptune V airborne interception radar in the nose of the nightfighter, along with the two large drop tanks routinely carried under the forward fuselage of the aircraft. These two modifications added a significant amount of additional drag to the Me 262, but its performance was so spectacular that this still meant it was significantly faster than the de Havilland Mosquitos which were its primary target. The rear cockpit was modified to accept a basic radar console by the removal of the control column and moving the seat forward which also allowed for the installation of a larger internal fuel tank – in a less than ideal arrangement, this tank would have to be filled through the open canopy of the rear cockpit.

 

Although produced in relatively small numbers, these elusive night hunters proved to be extremely effective in this role and helped to further underline the technological edge the Germans had at this stage of the war, even though it proved to be a case of too little, too late with regard to the ultimate outcome. As the Allies closed in on final victory and began to overrun former Luftwaffe airfields, a frantic race to capture this jet technology intact became of paramount importance, with British, US and Russian units given specific orders to secure these highly prized assets for evaluation.

 

New parts for new Messerschmitt Me 262 kit

 

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With stunning artwork like this around, it is no wonder that the Messerschmitt Me 262 jet fighter continues to be a source of fascination to this day

 

With the historical importance of the Me 262 jet fighter, there was absolutely no doubt that our newly tooled 1/72nd scale example, which was initially released in early 2017 (A03088), was going to be well received by modellers. In fact, it has proved incredibly difficult to keep this kit in stock since its release, with our website currently inviting pre-orders for a future production run, although it may be possible to pick up an example in model shops up and down the country. With the announcement of the 2018 model range, Airfix fans would have no doubt been excited to see the inclusion of a second release from this popular tooling, this time allowing the construction of the B-1a trainer and distinctive B-1a/U1 Behelfsnachtjager (interim night fighter) versions of the world’s first jet fighter to see operational service. With two distinctive scheme options accompanying the future release of this fantastic kit, it appears as if interest in this historic aircraft is showing absolutely no sign of diminishing and our modelling display shelves are about to be graced by two more fascinating examples of the Me 262.

 

As there are some significant differences between the Messerschmitt Me 262A-1A single seat fighter version of the first release and this two seat trainer version, A04062 introduces a completely new component frame to the kit, along with additional clear parts for the three section elongated canopy. In an exclusive first look for Workbench readers, we are pleased to bring you pictures of the test sprue components of the new kit, both as the complete set and with the new component frames individually presented. This important development highlights the fact that this handsome new kit is advancing nicely towards its currently scheduled October release date.

 

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Test frames from the new Messerschmitt Me 262 B-1a/U1 / Avia CS-92 kit, showing all the parts (minus clears)

 

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Exclusive test frame image showing the new fuselage and ancillary components for the Me 262 B-1a/U1 nightfighter

 

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The new clear components needed to build a two seat Messerschmitt Me 262

 

The distinctive shape of the new Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 kit is only one side of this impressive new kit’s undoubted appeal, as its beautiful sweeping lines will be further enhanced by the addition of two attractive new scheme options in which to finish your model. Let’s take a closer look at why these make such interesting subjects for the aviation modeller.

 

Messerschmitt Me 262 B-1a/U1 Nightfighter, Wk. Nr 111980 ‘Red 12’, 10./Nachtjagdgeschwader 11, Schleswig, Germany, May 1945. Additional decals provided for the aircraft as operated by the Royal Aircraft Establishment Aerodynamic Flight

 

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Full painting and decal placement guide for completing the 10./NJG 11 Nightfighter, including when it was flown in British hands

 

The Luftwaffe had battled long and hard to overcome the effectiveness of British Mosquitos which roamed with some degree of impunity over German occupied Europe, performing reconnaissance, pathfinding and strategic bombing duties with notable success. Specific units had been established to counter the Mosquito threat, with some pilots resorting to removing the paint from their fighters and having them highly polished, in an attempt to obtain a more speed with which to catch the British raiders. The arrival of the Me 262 jet fighter finally allowed the Luftwaffe to challenge these hated Mosquito raids, with the aircraft possessing even greater speed that the ‘Wooden Wonder’, although they themselves would be hunted mercilessly by Allied fighters now fully aware of their existence. At the end of 1944, successful nightfighter ace Kurt Welter was given command of a specialist unit, 10./NJG 11, which was equipped with a small number of Messerschmitt Me 262 single seat fighters and tasked with disrupting the RAF’s night bombing campaign and specifically to target the Mosquitos which had been proving to be such a menace. These nocturnal hunters soon began to score victories and were later supplemented with a handful of two seat Me 262 B-1a/U1 variants optimised for night fighting operations, although the actual number is the subject of some debate and ranges from between four to ten aircraft.

 

Kurt Welter would prove to be particularly adept at this type of aerial warfare and was not only regarded as the Luftwaffe’s greatest jet nightfighter ace, but also the most successful jet ace of WWII. From a total of 93 night missions, he claimed no fewer than 56 victories (63 in all operations) of which 33 were claimed to be against Mosquito intruders. In the years following the end of WWII, these claims have been suggested to be significantly exaggerated by several historians and indeed official RAF loss records would suggest that they have a strong case.

 

As the war neared its conclusion, Welter seemed to have a rather pragmatic view on the future of Europe and the potential security of the men under his command. He ensured that his unit were in possession of as many Messerschmitt Me 262s as possible when they moved to the base at Schleswig-Jagel, near the Danish border and contacted British forces with an offer of surrender – this was thought to be the only such action by a jet equipped Luftwaffe unit. Amongst the aircraft handed over to the British was Me 262 B-1a/U1 ‘Red 12’ (Wk.Nr 111980) which was said to have been one of four such aircraft captured, three of which were in airworthy condition – conclusive photographic evidence only exists of two such aircraft, which made these incredibly rare birds indeed. Red 12 had its pervious national markings removed, to be replaced by RAF roundels and fin flash and was test flown at Schleswig by the Royal Aircraft Establishment Aerodynamic Flight, reputedly with the assistance of former members of Kommando Welter. It was later ferried to Gilze-Rijen in Holland and then on to Farnborough, where it underwent a concerted period of testing and evaluation. It was destroyed in 1947 following damage sustained during severe gales and was subsequently scrapped. In one final act of Luftwaffe defiance, this aircraft was also used by another Luftwaffe ace, Herbert Altner, in the destruction of an RAF Mosquito over Berlin on 3rd April 1945.

 

Of the small number of Messerschmitt Me 262 B-1a/U1 nightfighters produced, only one genuine example remains intact and that is displayed at the National Museum of Military History in Johannesburg, South Africa.

 

Avia CS-92 ‘V-31’ (CS-92-5), VLU, Zatec, Czechoslovakia, September 1947

 

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The fascinating scheme details for this unusual aircraft, one of the last Me 262 jet aircraft to see operational service

 

Due to the importance of the Messerschmitt Me 262 to the German war effort and the ever increasing dominance of the Allied air forces over Europe, production of the aircraft was dispersed across Germany and wider Europe, in an attempt to ensure a constant supply of new aircraft. The Avia production facility in Czechoslovakia was engaged in manufacturing nose and forward fuselage sections of the aircraft, but it was planned that the factory would start full production once the necessary arrangements had been made. Other factories in the country were producing major components for the Jumo 004B engines, so when Russian forces liberated the factories intact, the country was holding significant stocks of Me 262 components and the new government decided that these would be pressed into service with the Czech Air Force. With one factory producing a Czech version of the Jumo 004B engines (now designated M-04) and the Avia plant resuming work on producing the aircraft themselves, they concentrated their efforts on the 18 former Luftwaffe airframes they were holding in storage. The aircraft would carry the designation Avia S-92 Turbina (with S denoting fighter), with these aircraft being virtually identical to the Me 262A-1a fighters of the Luftwaffe.

 

As well as the nine S-92 fighters produced for Czech use, Avia also produced three two seat training variants of the aircraft, which were referred to as Avia CS-92s and were once again almost identical to the Me 262B-1a operated by the Luftwaffe during WWII. The limited production run included single and two seat variants being manufactured at the same time, using the complete sections finished during the war and original construction blueprints secured some time later. Due to the fact that each aircraft was basically hand built by craftsmen engineers at the Avia factory, only 12 machines would eventually be delivered to the Czechoslovak Air Force, where they would all serve with the 5th Fighter Squadron at Praha-Kbely Air Base, charged with the defence of the Capital. By 1950, the S-92 fighters were withdrawn from squadron service and reassigned to ground instructional duties, with the two seat CS-92s soldiering on for a further twelve months. Although there were tentative plans to develop the aircraft and search for overseas sales, closer ties with the Soviet Union and the Avia factory’s desire to produce the Mig-15 under licence dictated that this never became a reality. Historically, the Czech Air Force were the only other air force in the world apart from the Luftwaffe to use the Messerschmitt Me 262 operationally, as well as being the last to operate the world’s first operational jet fighter – a fascinating footnote in the history of this important aircraft. Two examples of the Avia built aircraft survive to this day, one single seat S-92 and a two seat CS-92, which are both on display at the Vojenske Muzeum, Kbely AB, Czech Republic.

 

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Stencil placement guidance to be used when building the Me 262 B-1a/U1 Nightfighter

 

This unusual scheme helps to illustrate the story of the final service Messerschmitt Me 262s and how they managed to live on several years after the end of the Second World War. They will also make for a real conversation starter when displayed next to Luftwaffe examples of the mighty Me 262, especially in this elegant two seat configuration. Our new Messerschmitt Me 262 B-1a/U1 / Avia CS-92 kit A04062 is scheduled for an October release and we are very much looking forward to bringing you the artwork reveal which will accompany this stunning release.

 

V.P.

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Source: https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/news/workbench/lusty-lindy-welcomes-airfix-tribute-at-yorkshire-air-museum

 

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Menace in the moonlight

 

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Our latest exclusive box artwork reveal has to be considered one of the most impressive we have ever featured

 

Since we launched our Workbench blog over three years ago, there has been one type of feature which has consistently maintained its popularity with our ever growing readership, the exclusive reveal of the latest product artwork which will grace the forthcoming release of a new Airfix kit. With this stunning digital artwork continuing the enduring legacy of the classic Airfix box artwork from years past, we have been proud to bring you these exclusive 'first looks' at images which both serve as inspiration for many a model build and usually signify the imminent release of a highly anticipated new kit. There have been some truly stunning images published throughout the history of Workbench and we will all no doubt have our particular favourites, but this latest offering really is something a little bit special. Produced in support of the scheduled October release of Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a A04062, this magnificent image captures the deadly nocturnal battle which took place between RAF Bomber Command and the most advanced aircraft available to the Luftwaffe in the final months of the Second World War.

 

As the world’s first operational jet fighter, the Me 262 posed a significant threat to Allied aircraft operating in the skies above Europe and held the potential to wreak havoc amongst the bomber streams which were pulverising German targets on a daily basis. Once Allied military planners discovered what this strange new aircraft was and the blistering performance it possessed, the German jet fighters were hunted mercilessly by Allied aircraft which were inferior to it in almost every respect, but held a significant numerical advantage over the jet. In areas of suspected jet operation, bombers would attempt to destroy anything which resembled an airfield, hopefully catching some of the feared new fighters on the ground, before they could be used against them. In the air, large numbers of Mustangs would cruise above the bomber formations, hoping to lure the Messerschmitts into the air, where at least their greater numbers gave them the possibility of shooting one or two down, but more likely just reducing the effectiveness of their attack runs against the bombers by adopting particularly aggressive flying tactics.

 

Due to the speed advantage held by the Me 262, they would usually manage to avoid being intercepted by Allied fighters in most engagements, but these jets had to be stopped at all costs and the Allies had a plan with which to achieve this. With all available assets dedicated to finding the bases where the jets were operating from, squadrons of aircraft would loiter in the vicinity of suspected Me 262 hotspots and ruthlessly pick them off as they made their landing approach, where the pilot’s workload was at its most demanding and the performance of their early jet engines was least effective. Even after the war had ended, the race to find these revolutionary aircraft continued, as ground units were desperate to secure as many airworthy or easily reparable examples as they could, so the Allies could unlock the secrets of German jet technology and compare it to their own fledgling jet powered projects. Aircraft which were found were placed under 24 hour armed guard, until arrangements could be made to transport them back to the UK for test and evaluation purposes.

 

Although the Messerschmitt Me 262 possessed frightening destructive potential, the jet was only thought to be responsible for shooting down around 400 Allied aircraft in just under twelve months of combat operations, with just a small fraction of these victories attributed to the two seat nighfighter variant of the jet. Even so, these radar equipped nocturnal hunters have held a particular fascination with enthusiasts since the end of WWII, possibly because of the clandestine nature of their operation and partly because so few actually made it to front line units. These sinister shapes lurking in the night sky were unable to make a telling contribution to the outcome of the war, but paved the way for some extremely effective jet aircraft to follow, which harnessed the greater speed and firepower of slightly larger aircraft, but required a two man crew to operate effectively. History has shown that the airmen of Bomber Command were forced to endure enough hardship without having to face a large and well organised force of Me 262 nightfighters in the final months of WWII, so it is perhaps fortuitous that their service introduction was somewhat troubled.

 

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The full box design of Me 262B-1a which will have modellers rushing to their local supplier following its October release

 

The evocative artwork which will soon announce the arrival of the new 1/72nd scale Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a A04062 features a burning Halifax over a heavily bombed city, which is clearly the latest victim of prowling ‘Red 12’ from the Luftwaffe’s 10./Nachtjagdgeschwader 11. As one of the most sinister looking aircraft ever to take to the skies and resembling something of an airborne Great White Shark, this latest release from the new Messerschmitt Me 262 tooling will undoubtedly be one of our most successful kits of 2018 and one which may prove challenging to get hold of in the weeks following its release. With its October launch date fast approaching, this may be an ideal opportunity to check your order status with your supplier, or to snap up one of the remaining kits available on the Airfix website. Having charted the progress of this kit since it was first announced at the beginning of the year, this beautiful artwork reveal has only served to further increase our excitement at the impending release of this two seat version of the Me 262 fighter, one of the most significant aircraft in the history of aerial warfare.

 

V.P.

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Something's been bothering me about those sprue shots.

The canopy arrangement seems to be correct for the nightfighter with it's higher sill. Studying photos online, the CS-92 seems to be configured (logically) the same way as the German 2-seat trainer variant with the lower canopy sill.
 

I understand there are also differences with the rear seating position between the types, as well as the obvious changes to equipment according to function. I'm no expert in this area, but I can't see any parts to accommodate these differences.

 

Cheers,
Bill.

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8 hours ago, Heraldcoupe said:

Something's been bothering me about those sprue shots.

The canopy arrangement seems to be correct for the nightfighter with it's higher sill. Studying photos online, the CS-92 seems to be configured (logically) the same way as the German 2-seat trainer variant with the lower canopy sill.
 

I understand there are also differences with the rear seating position between the types, as well as the obvious changes to equipment according to function. I'm no expert in this area, but I can't see any parts to accommodate these differences.

 

Cheers,
Bill.

There was some discussion about this regarding the new Revell 1/32 Me-262B nightfighter here:

 

Me-262 nightfighter and trainer

 

 

 

 

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On 9/16/2018 at 3:30 AM, Aerobat said:

There was some discussion about this regarding the new Revell 1/32 Me-262B nightfighter here:

 

Me-262 nightfighter and trainer

 

These are the concerns I have.
Revell though, aren't advertising the kit as a trainer, but as a pure nightfighter.

 

Cheers,

Bill.

Edited by Heraldcoupe

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That fantastic box art almost makes me want to fight my way through another build of the kit. 

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I guess this new boxing puts Revell's Me 262B-1a/U1 to rest.

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15 hours ago, IanC said:

That fantastic box art almost makes me want to fight my way through another build of the kit. 

Excellent box art! Pity Airfix hasn't seen fit yet to issue a new tool Halifax B.III to go with it. Maybe a (very one sided) dogfight double kit?😀

 

Allan

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3 hours ago, Albeback52 said:

Excellent box art! Pity Airfix hasn't seen fit yet to issue a new tool Halifax B.III to go with it. Maybe a (very one sided) dogfight double kit?😀

 

Allan

 

Probably less one-sided than you'd think given the closing speeds. The 262s had problems enough in daylight against four-engined bombers. At night it must have been even harder to draw a bead on one. In that respect the faster Mossies might have been more vulnerable?

 

Still, agree with you about the Halifax!

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14 hours ago, IanC said:

 

Probably less one-sided than you'd think given the closing speeds. The 262s had problems enough in daylight against four-engined bombers. At night it must have been even harder to draw a bead on one. In that respect the faster Mossies might have been more vulnerable?

 

Still, agree with you about the Halifax!

Never thought of it that way! Several of the hitherto almost invulnerable Mosquito s were in fact lost during a short period in February - March 1945. It is believed they were brought down by 262s

 

Allan

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Sorry Airfix, 18.99 is too steep for me. I'll just stick with my Hasegawa/Heller/Revell kits from the stash. Kits are getting too expensive now, I used to buy multiples but now it's only one and very far apart.

 

Paul Harrison

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On 14/09/2018 at 11:04, Homebee said:

I was hoping Me 262 Yellow 4 would still be at Hendon. I was planning to record my visit at that museum and take a good look at that 262

Edited by Sturmovik

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On 9/24/2018 at 1:55 AM, Sturmovik said:

I guess this new boxing puts Revell's Me 262B-1a/U1 to rest.

Well, since I can get almost three of the RoG kits for what Airfix is asking - not quite.

 

Cheers,

 

Andre

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4 hours ago, Hook said:

Well, since I can get almost three of the RoG kits for what Airfix is asking - not quite.

 

Cheers,

 

Andre

How are the canopies in the RoG boxings. The last RoG single seater I bought had clear parts that were unusable.

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