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What are you reading?

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Just started Old man's war by John Scalzi.

It's Sci fi and the premise is when you get to 75

you go off into space, re-bodied,  to fight wars

but you can never return to Earth.

There is a series of these so I may well get more

on the strength of what I've read so far.

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Corals of the world, J. veron. I'm reading this on and off, tis a mighty tome.

Corals, E. Borneman.

Fish Health, Andrews, Carrington & Excell.

(my nose is in assorted fish books on a regular basis, water chemistry and general health, it's a list I continually read as there's far too much to remember!)

I don't have any corals! I'm just fascinated by them, I would have some but, hmmm, expensive game.......

 

A little something for the aviation enthusiast in me,

Wings of the navy/Luftwaffe, Brown. I think these were the last two books I bought, I'm halfway through wings of the navy, I'm doing that one cover to cover, the Luftwaffe book, I've read several types but in no particular order.

Either way these are good books.

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44 Days: 75 Squadron and the fight for Australia, by Michael Veitch (the author was originally a comedian, but this is his 4th book on, mainly, Australian aircrew during WWII.) When I bought the book last week, while on a short trip to Sydney, I was in a hurry and didn't look too closely, so I was surprised to discover back at the hotel that it is signed by the author.

 

Also reading - The Spy Catchers: The Official History of ASIO 1949-1963 (Vol. I), by David Horner

Edited by DennisTheBear

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Recently started The German War: A Nation Under Arms, 1939-45 by Nicholas Stargardt, which is about life on the home front in Germany. Stargardt has chosen a number of people from different backgrounds and is largely -though not exclusively- telling the story from their letters and diaries. It makes for fascinating reading in the parallels with the British home front, but in the differences too. The Germans executed quite a few conscientious objectors, for a start. So far I have reached the fall of France, but it will be very interesting to see how things change as the war goes on.

 

Edited by T7 Models

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On Thursday, September 29, 2016 at 5:24 AM, Airgunner said:

First Light again. Started it at work last night, will finish it tonight.

I've been reading that, on and off, to my 6 year old daughter.:pilot:

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Just got 'Wings on My Sleeve' so will start that tonight

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Almost all of my books are packed up so we can show (and hopefully sell) our house so that we can buy an infinitely and onerously more expensive one. I only have three books to my name at present: Su-7/Su-17 Family, by Yefim Gordon, Fighters of the Future, by Bill Gunston, and the three books of John Le Carre's Karla Trilogy. I love 1980s defense futurists; they were living on a bubble that was about to burst, but everything they discussed was fascinating to me as a boy and it fills me with wistful nostalgia now as a lumpy man. 

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Grabbed a copy of Le Carre's "The Spy who came in from the cold" at an airport on the way home from a family funeral- a brilliant read.

Might get the old Richard Burton movie version on Bluray... 

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Just finished Coffin Road by Peter May - a cracker! - and have started The Girl on the Train, which really isn't floating my boat at all so far. Still, I'm only about a quarter into it ...

 

And, just to keep Roy happy, I own, and keep rereading, Pratchett's Tiffany Aching set - good reads for big kids as well as little! How sad he died when he did - the last one in the set (The Shepherd's Crown) shows clearly that he had lots of other ideas to go in, but wasn't able to develop them.

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On 9/28/2016 at 7:36 PM, Pete in Lincs said:

Just started Old man's war by John Scalzi.

It's Sci fi and the premise is when you get to 75

you go off into space, re-bodied,  to fight wars

but you can never return to Earth.

There is a series of these so I may well get more

on the strength of what I've read so far.

 

I read it a little while back. It was OK, not the classic some chalk it up to be but also not the completely derivative military SciFi bore others do.

 

I think though, that the whole central conceit could have been explored more with very little given to the fact that these are 'old' men in young bodies as compared to the 'young' men in young bodies that have fought in the wars in our past, present and (likely) future. Most of them, from what I remembered, seemed to revert to an almost teenage state of mind when presented with their new digs and I feel a trick was missed.

 

I'm currently, like Darbs, reading wings on my sleeve, though it's slow going as I mostly leave it in the car for when I get to a meeting too early (which is always, as I cannot abide being late).

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Currently reading BOMBER HARRIS -SIR ARTHUR HARRIS'DESPATCH ON WAR OPERATIONS 1942 -1945, by Hohn Grehan & Martin Mace.

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Corduroy, by Adrian Bell, after seeing it recommended a page or do back, about 1/3 into it & really beginning to enjoy it, thanks Ray.

Steve.

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Recently finished John Pina Craven's The Silent War. An extraordinary man involved in so many fascinating underwater aspects of the Cold War that it is all the more extraordinary he has produced such a staggeringly dull book. I suspect his hand was stayed by so many security caveats - self-imposed or otherwise - that it reads more like a dry bureaucratic report than an insight into history.

 

Also wading though Images: A Reader, an eclectic anthology on visual culture. Surprised to note how much Plato said about representation and imitation that would ring true to many people here on Britmodeller!

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I'm currently 2/3rds of the way through Flying the SR-71 Blackbird by Rich Graham.

At Cosford there was a good range of his books and I decided a cautious approach on the pricing scedule, so selected this one. Glad I did too!

 

An eminently readable style of writing which is certainly required on some of the more technical stuff. The author easily puts things into layman's terms.

What a true beast of an aircraft. The pilot was the chap who had a massive workload but was only one cog in a massive machine that made the aircraft fly and brought back the results.

Along the way, Richard eliminates some of the "stories" which have become "facts", such as the President getting the SR letters around the wrong way and the redesignating the code to avoid making him look foolish.

 

A superb book and recommended to others who are interested in this programme.

9:10.

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Still reading "The unwomanly face of war" by Svetlana Alexievitch, every night, just before getting to sleep.

 

At lunch time I always read a bit of one of Aviation Classics' bookazines in digital form on my smartphone. Currently reading the issue on the FW 190.

 

Cheers

 

Jaime

 

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Just finished "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville. I found it a real slog and had to force myself to finish it.

 

For a quick fix to cheer myself up I'm going to read Pratchett's last discworld novel "The Shepherd's Crown" next.

 

Finnthedude.

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On 30/09/2016 at 4:21 PM, Troffa said:

Grabbed a copy of Le Carre's "The Spy who came in from the cold" at an airport on the way home from a family funeral- a brilliant read.

Might get the old Richard Burton movie version on Bluray... 

It's one of his best, I think.

 

I watched that on tv a few months ago - it had been a while since I'd seen it, and was quite surprised how intense it got as it moved to the denouement.

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After finishing Wings on My Sleeve I've started (and am half way through) Phoenix Squadron by Roland White. I've read it before so it's laziness from me. It's an enjoyable read though but could do with a little fact checking on some minor points (ie. salacious as it may be Mr. White; Crabb was not found "with his throat slashed by a Soviet frogman" his, supposed, body washed up without hands or head...because that's what happens to bodies that have been in the water for 14 months).

 

Still a nice light read though.

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I seem to be one of the few whose reading is primarily fiction and not modelling-related.

 

After I finished Robert Harris' "Imperium" I read "So Much for That" by Lionel Shriver. Generally I can take or leave her work but "So Much for That" is an extraordinary story of terminal mesothelioma and manhood enlargement gone wrong which manages to be grim, moving and hilarious all at once. Finished it yesterday and have now started "Burmese Days" by George Orwell. I'm only a few pages in but it's already clear why Orwell's British publisher initially wouldn't touch it for fear of libel. An extremely unflattering portrait of the British Empire.

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On 9/30/2016 at 3:34 PM, Procopius said:

I love 1980s defense futurists; they were living on a bubble that was about to burst, but everything they discussed was fascinating to me as a boy and it fills me with wistful nostalgia now as a lumpy man. 

  1. Would you be describing people such as General Sir John Hackett, author of The Third World War? That was from 1978, but he followed it up in 1985.

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Just now, JosephLalor said:
  1. Would you be describing people such as General Sir John Hackett, author of The Third World War? That was from 1978, but he followed it up in 1985.

 

I have that book and love it! I read it many times as a young man (c.1994, when I was 11) and thought it terribly realistic compared to my other favourite, Red Storm Rising. I reread it recently, and it's very interesting to see what they failed to see coming in 1978. Thank goodness the mighty bulwark of the Shah's Iran was there to help us see off Johnny Russian, though.

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"I read it many times as a young man (c.1994, when I was 11)"

 

Procopius

to most of us on here you still are

 

:clif:

 

Just picked up a copy of Saul Davids Military Blunders for some "short story" style easy reading between some complex contract law papers I am suffering reading for a complex case. 

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