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What are you reading?

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Currently going back through Ready player one, while I get around to visiting the excellent local second hand book shop to see what interesting military history he has in stock

quite into peninsula war period at the moment as I think I’ve covered most of WW2 ever published

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Typhoon Tale by James Kyle. I think from a recommendation from this thread, early days yet but finding it very interesting, his account of growing up in a Scottish mining town outside Glasgow was a real eye opener. We don't know how lucky we are. :)

Steve.

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Re reading Richard Morgan, gone through Altered Carbon and Broken Angels, now on Woken Furies.

Just put up new bookshelves and got my collection out of storage.

2019-01-26_10-20-31

 

Edited by John_W

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On 1/7/2019 at 4:27 PM, spaddad said:

This thread.

Does it end like all other novels?

The butler did it.

 

:D

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I have a book I'd like to read but I can't remember what its called or the name of the author so I'm appealing to you in the hope of identifying said volume. It's a memoir of the Falklands campaign written by, I think, a Marine or Para NCO.

thanks,

spad

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Vince Bramley's book is also titled Excursion into hell depending upon which edition you get.  His book includes the trip down on the Canberra and the tab across the island.

 

Another one is A soldier's song by Ken Lukowaik which covers Goose Green.

 

 

 

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On ‎1‎/‎25‎/‎2019 at 3:21 AM, stevehnz said:

Typhoon Tale by James Kyle. I think from a recommendation from this thread, early days yet but finding it very interesting, his account of growing up in a Scottish mining town outside Glasgow was a real eye opener. We don't know how lucky we are. :)

Steve.

Quite so: 

 

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Gun button to fire. Tom Neil.

 

It occurred to me that I've been reading this type of biography

on and off for just over fifty years now. I never tire of them. 

Bless them all. :poppy:

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The White Spider, by Heinrich Harrer.  It's about the early attempts on the north face of the Eiger in the mid-twentieth century from one of the first team to make it; makes for grim reading in places.

 

EDIT- time period corrected.

Edited by Ravens

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North to the Orient, by Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Finding it interesting, I'm seeing a Sirius kit in my future, might have to loose my resin virginity to get one by the look.

Steve.

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The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell. A "must read" for Socialists!!

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Not so much reading as listening to Max Hastings book on the Korean War, just finished listening again to Terry Pratchetts 'The Truth'. Very slowly reading a book about the Fairey IIIF. Big advantage it has a lot of pictures

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If anyone is looking for an action techno thriller my little brother’s first book finally hit UK bookstores yesterday. 

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hunter-most-explosive-gripping-thriller/dp/1472256352?SubscriptionId=AKIAIALSOTUXWIGNQNJA&tag=theelopag-21&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=1472256352

 

As fellow aviation enthusiasts (and correspondingly often slightly pedantic) you’ll be pleased to know that the publishers made especially sure for us that the helicopter on the cover was the right one (1st cover had an Augusta A129 and my whole feedback was along the lines of “looks cool but that isn’t a Super Huey”)

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SWMBO dragged me persuaded me to go to the local garden centre where I found Six Weeks of Blenheim Summer by Alistair Panton and Victoria Panton Bacon.  Alistair Panton's account of flying Blenheims in the Battle of France, reconnaissance and bombing.  A splendid read and a useful reminder that fighting in France did not end with the Dunkirk evacuation.

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Doctor Sleep, by Stephen King. In preparation for the movie that is being released later this year.

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Reading on phone (as good size for me to read easily)  for fall asleep over book at night, 'Public Enemies' by Bryan Burroughs, it is an interesting book and much better than the film. 

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The Lost Pilots  by Corey Mead, early days yet but it reads quite well. The story of Bill Lancaster & Jessie Miller who flew England-Australia in an Avro Avian in 1927-28. Lancaster was later lost in the Sahara attempting the England-Capetown record in 1933, his aircraft with his body alongside not being found till 1962. I'd never heard of either of these flights before so very much my own voyage of discovery.

Steve.

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John Le Carre's first Smiley book, A Call for the Dead (1961).

 

Great read so far. 

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Started a new book to fall asleep over, 'The Moonstone' by Wilkie Collins. I have heard a fairly good radio adaption, but have never got to grips with the book, that has been regarded as the first  'modern' detective fiction novel. Like a fair few Victorian writers etc. Collins had an 'interesting' private life, with at least two concurrent mistresses. 

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On the train to Aberdeen and just started The Fleet at Floodtide, James D Hornfischer and also downloaded on my Kindle for this trip away is Carrier Clash, Eric Hammel.

Inspiration for nexts leave's project? Could be. 😉

 

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Finished reading Branko Milanovic's "Global Inequality : A New Approach for the Age of Globalization" in a Portuguese translation. Very interesting but beware if you don't like statistical analysis.

 

Last night started reading "Factfulness", by Hans Rosling, Anna Rosling Roennlund and Ola Rosling. It's about our tendency to focus on the bad news and not noticing how the world is really much better than we think in many areas (fact based, not wishful thinking). Seems promising.

 

Cheers

 

Jaime

 

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Just finished Pacific Thunder by Thomas Cleaver.

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