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What are you reading?

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I'm sure they also print those instructions with ink that looks less legible on the damp cardboard of a ding-dinner <_<

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On 11/09/2016 at 9:27 PM, Ray S said:

Corduroy by Adrian Bell. An every day tale of Suffolk folk.

Cheers, Ray

I had never heard of it, and I live in the county. Written 20 years before I was born. I bought a copy. Brilliant - a shame it's not still like that. (Parts of it still are - we value some of the old ways.)

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I finished Viper Pilot by Dan Hampton on the plane home from New Mexico. Hampton sounds like, if you'll excuse my French, a dick, in the least complimentary sense of the phrase, but seems to have been a skilled Wild Weasel driver (certainly in his own mind, at the very least), and in between his empty-headed ruminations on what's wrong with the Air Force (people who think, mainly), there's some fascinating detail on anti-SAM missions and the USAF in transition from the Cold War into the modern, crappy era.

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Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking.

 

I fail to think so regularly that when I heard of the book, off to abebooks.com I went. Four days and $3.37 later it arrived, and I have to say it's fascinating...

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Just finished George Monbiot's Feral, just started Peter Ackroyd's London.

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I was reminded earlier on another thread of  how much I used to enjoy John Wyndham. 

 

Got Mrs. Tiger to pull 'The Kraken Wakes' off the shelf.

 

Its still good :)

 

TonyT

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Having finished Margaret MacMillan's "The Uses and Abuses of history" last week (highly recommended, by the way), I'm now reading Svetlana Aleksievitch's "War's Unwomanly Face" (in a Portuguese translation). I'm afraid this isn't currently available in English but Tony found it will soon be reissued.

 

This is the first book published by Svetlana and presents the Great Patriotic War as seen and lived by the soviet women. It's a very tough read but highly recommended in order not to forget what a war really is and what it does to common people.

 

Cheers

Jaime

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Currently reading Thunder In May by Andy Johnson. Great fictionalised book about the Blitzkrieg in 1940 centred around the Coldstream Guards in France and Belgium. Next up will be Seelow Nord by the same author about the German invasion of Britain. Quite a few characters carry over from Thunder In May.  Seelow Nord see the Germans invade via Bridlington and the East coast.  Cracking stuff!

 

Also reading history of 79 Armoured Div in WW2. Fascinating stuff.

 

Regards 

 

Steve 

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im still reading Empire of the clouds, great book some interesting info but sometimes do struggle to pick it up lol

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1491 by Charles Mann.   

 

Re-reading I should say as it's one of the best books providing insight into North and South America pre-European contact.

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Just cleared up my modelling stuff and taking away the last sheet of protective newspaper I read an article on how the Post Boxes in Plympton have been repainted. Life just doesn't get any more exciting. I may have to go and see these boxes for myself.

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Spitfire Offensive, by Wing Commander RWF "Sammy" Sampson and Norman Franks. It's a fascinating book, and it seems to have been written rather later than many other memoirs of its type, so one gets a lot of insight into things not discussed in the crop of  1950s and 1960s-era memoirs. (Lots of swearing, etc.) It also mentions one of my heroes, Group Captain J I T "Taffy" Jones, a fire-eating WWI ace (34 victories) and "squadron biographer" of 74 (Tiger) Squadron who trained fighter pilots in WWII. Sadly, it confirms some suspicions of mine -- Jones had a drinking problem and was released from the RAF for drinking with a cadet who then had a fatal crash. (He would later fall off a ladder in his home in the 1960s and die from his injuries, I suspect, while intoxicated.)

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"They all love Jack: busting the Ripper" by Bruce Robinson. Not a true crime fan by any means, but this is an impassioned page-turner, written after a decade of research by the Withnail scribe, and boy is he angry. He identifies the Ripper (and his case is pretty much unarguable by the end) but also skewers the Victorian Establishment and that era's Freemasons, and the more modern Ripperologists into the bargain...

 

It's long but pacy, and hard to put down and the tone steers far away from the usual voyeuristic red and black covered True Crime nastiness...

 

best,

M.

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A Chas Bowyer book about the Bristol Blenheim.

 

(Also discovered that a friend's father flew in them.)

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Finished the Lancaster Story and Atlantic Queens just started Mob Star: The Story of John Gotti - Gene Mustain and Jerry Capeci...

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I casually started Stuart Prebble's Secrets of the Conqueror late last night and have been unable to put it down since. An addictive mix of submarining and clandestine undertakings. I'm actually meant to be reading about camera sensors but can't see that happening tonight either. I love that feeling when a book unexpectedly grabs hold of your frontal lobes and doesn't drop the pace until it's finished.

 

Recently bought a hardback copy of Ronald Hutton's The Triumph of the Moon as the print in the paperback edition was too small and densely-spaced to let you concentrate on for long periods. It's an excellent history of modern witchcraft that continues his wider scholarship into paganism in Britain. 

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Is it an indication of the fact the people here make (mostly) aircraft or military type models?

Almost everyone is reading military or air related stuff.

 

Am I the only old duffer here reading fictional, daft, entertaining tripe?

I ask in fun, but also in real observational terms...:D

 

Roy.

 

 

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Just read the contact details on the side of an ICM box (lid type for those who fret about that sort of thing) whilst waiting for the kettle to boil.

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1 hour ago, roymattblack said:

Is it an indication of the fact the people here make (mostly) aircraft or military type models?

Almost everyone is reading military or air related stuff.

 

Am I the only old duffer here reading fictional, daft, entertaining tripe?

I ask in fun, but also in real observational terms...:D

 

Roy.

 

 

 

I read a lot of military history, aviation and general history books but not only. Just to prove the point :) I've ordered some fiction from one of the big online stores:

 

 

I also ordered: Apollo 13, by Jim Lovell

 

On a completely different note, I just bought the first volume of the Bible, translated to Portuguese from the original Greek sources by Frederico Lourenço, one of my country's best classical scholars, who already translated Homer's Iliad and Odyssey from the original sources as well (keeping both as poems and not adapting them to prose). This translation of the Bible intends to be faithful to the original text, by not introducing any theological adaptations or interpretations from the last 2000 years, sticking to a historical-critical approach to the sources. The project will last until 2019 and will consist of 6 volumes. The resulting Bible has more books than those traditionally found in Catholic and Protestant Bibles. The first volume, just published last week, covers the Four Gospels.

 

I'm not a religious type but the project is fascinating and the introductory texts and analysis presented by the translator are superb. I'm not an expert and haven't read much of the traditional Bibles before but the resulting text is very transparent and direct and all translation decisions, as well as all departures from the traditional translations are explained and commented in footnotes.

 

Highly recommended to anyone interested in the foundations of Western Civilisation (and able to read Portuguese, of course).

 

Hope you find this interesting :)

 

Cheers

 

Jaime

 

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1 hour ago, roymattblack said:

Is it an indication of the fact the people here make (mostly) aircraft or military type models?

Almost everyone is reading military or air related stuff.

 

Am I the only old duffer here reading fictional, daft, entertaining tripe?

I ask in fun, but also in real observational terms...:D

 

Roy.

 

 

 

Roy,

 

among the the non fiction I thoroughly enjoy daft, fictional entertaining tripe, too.

 

Just started The Revenant, just finished Stephen King's Bazaar of Bad dreams, just finished operation big (hunt for Germany's A bomb scientists, have got Solomon Creed and Dominic Sandbrook's great British dream factory to read.

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Not long finished the third book in a series by a chap called Joshua Dalzelle, the Black Fleet trilogy. The books are Warship, Call to Arms and Counterstike. I didn't think I would like them, as being futuristic sci-fi (think Star Trek on steroids) they're not my usual fare, but I highly recommend them, they're proper page turners. I started the first one on Wednesday and finished the third one Sunday.

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I just read the four short stories in Ernest Hemingway's ' 'The Fifth Column' and Four Short Stories of the Spanish Civil War.'

 

This is Hemingway at his best, a complete pleasure to read. He has the ability to place the reader in dark, noisy, smoke filled, crowded bars in Spanish cities, in the middle of a war. Often in conversation with people of all nationalities, enjoying a glass of Gin and the last 'Quinine tonic' in town.

 

He even enables the reader to 'people watch'. Genius. Life in this very real environment of 80 years ago becomes today, lucid, clear and familiar.

 

I've never read his only play. That's next. 

Increasingly I'm tempted by books I see on this thread :) !

 

All best regards

TonyT

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I read for relaxation mostly or for inspiration in respect of the hobby. At the moment I have "The Star of Africa" The Story of Hans J Marseille. Cheers Greg 

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