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What are you reading?

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On 1/24/2019 at 8:31 PM, BadKarma75 said:

I think I’ve covered most of WW2 ever published

..blimey - individual book titles published on WW II according to the stats I've found number in the hundreds of thousands. There's always something 'new' to discover and new books being published...to reprise Jaime's post above it seems people just can't get enough of reading about the worst event ever in human history...if you think that's a bit of an exaggeration let me 'recommend' Jonathan Littell's  " The Kindly Ones "...historical fiction that won lots of prizes and a recommendation from Anthony Beevor on the cover  - a gripping but dreadful book ..

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Doing a bit of tidying up and came across my old copy of the Brian Lecomber book 'Talk Down' I can remember first reading it 40 years ago from the library and more or less read it in one go as I could not put it down. Now I live nearer where some of it takes place  and I know the area better as it is where Mrs T comes from, I think it might be time for another read. 

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On 1/6/2019 at 2:49 PM, Wafu said:

EASA, Part 66, B2 notes. Hoping to extend my Civil License to include Avionics.

 

 

Are you B3?

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axminster tool catalouge.  i blame @Gorby for inroducing me to this 

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1 hour ago, Antoine said:

Are you B3?

Yes, I’m B1-3, B1-4 and C rated.

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The Hounds of Hell, by Jean Larteguy, translated by Xan Fielding, I started it ages ago so may have mentioned it before but couldn't get into it, guess I wasn't in the right frame of mind so put it aside & read a several other books, back into it now & enjoying it, I think I've found its rhythm & it is now compelling, a novel of the messy time of Congo & Katanga. Nasty business.

Steve.

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On 1/6/2019 at 11:06 AM, cmatthewbacon said:

Have you read Bruce Dickinson’s “What does this button do?” Whether or not you’re an Iron Maiden fan (I’m not, especially), it’s a great read...

best,

M.

Thanks, I too didn't know about it.

I see that there's a French translation, but I'll go for the original, as always.

 

For the moment, I'm in the middle of this one, a refreshing change from combat jet/prop pilot bio.

 

ca_06610.jpg

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Half way through The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors by James Hornfischer. Arguably the US Navy’s finest hour and one of the most gallant destroyer actions in naval history. Something I knew a little of and enough to make me want to find out more. The handful of destroyers and destroyer escorts find themselves between a Japanese main battle fleet including the Yamato and other battleships, sundry cruisers and destroyers so decide to sell themselves dearly to save several escorts carriers that are sitting ducks. Well worth getting to know it. 

 

PS  I should add the Navy fliers who were geared up for anti sub and ground support to the marines who were landing at Leyte write their own chapter in history by making repeated strafing attacks on cruisers and battleships and once their ammo ran out they still did dummy attacks through the flak to make the ships change course and delay them getting to the small jeep carriers.

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Nearly finished Backroom boys - Building, maintaining and flying aircraft, '39 to '45.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Backroom-Boys-Personal-Britains-PAPERBACKS-ebook/dp/B014SVDRWO/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1551466549&sr=1-3&keywords=backroom+boys

 

Excellent, in their own words, and it includes the words of some of the Women that built the aircraft.

 

"By about the 200th cockpit (Halifax) we knew what we were doing" This was in a former bus garage.

" If they drilled a hole in the wrong place they filled it with chewing gum" This was building Wellingtons.

So many fascinating tales, I didn't want to put it down.

 

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12 hours ago, Pete in Lincs said:

Nearly finished Backroom boys - Building, maintaining and flying aircraft, '39 to '45.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Backroom-Boys-Personal-Britains-PAPERBACKS-ebook/dp/B014SVDRWO/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1551466549&sr=1-3&keywords=backroom+boys

 

Excellent, in their own words, and it includes the words of some of the Women that built the aircraft.

 

"By about the 200th cockpit (Halifax) we knew what we were doing" This was in a former bus garage.

" If they drilled a hole in the wrong place they filled it with chewing gum" This was building Wellingtons.

So many fascinating tales, I didn't want to put it down.

 

I have that book to read, looks as though it's just got bumped up the list.

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This one is also WW2 but a bit left field for me as it concerns the U-boat arm of the Kreigsmarine.

 

The secret diary of a U-Boat by Wolfgang Hirschfeld

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hirschfeld-Secret-Diary-U-Boat-1940-1946-ebook/dp/B00L1E1SF0/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1551990814&sr=1-1&keywords=hirschfeld

I found my copy in a charity shop and was hooked by what I read on the back cover. I'm now about halfway through and it's a real page turner. If you liked Das Boot....

 

Whilst there have been many memoirs written by U-boat commanders of the Second World War, a book such as this, based upon the diaries of a senior Petty Officer telegraphist, written in 'real time' is something very special. Wolfgang Hirschfeld, whose diaries Geoffrey Brooks has translated is a born story teller. He risked court martial in keeping his diaries!

Due to a missed train he lost his place on the Bismark, and so eventually sailed on U-109. He ended the war on U-234 heading for Japan.

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Posted (edited)

I have just finished reading:

Pocket Island by Charles Clark Munn (1848 - 1917)

This is a free download from Librivox, and I listen to these talking books whilst model building.   This one starts in the 1840s with a story of smuggl;ing off the coast of Maine, continued through the American Civil War, and ending again on Pocket Island.   A grand tale of adventure.     This is the final paragraph, which is very true, and sums up my own feelings at the age of 75:

 

Life at best is but an enigma, and like children pursuing a Will-o-the-Wisp, so do we all pursue the illusive beacon light of a brighter and happier to-morrow-always hoping, never attaining, though striving ever until, wearied of the vain pursuit, at last we fall by the wayside and are forgotten.

 

For anyone wishing to download this free talking book - here is the Librivox link: https://librivox.org/pocket-island-by-charles-clark-munn/

I put it in my Android tablet and listede to it from there.   It runs for five hours, twenty minutes -  Highly recommended!

Bob

Edited by ShipbuilderMN
Spelling mistake

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7 minutes ago, ShipbuilderMN said:

I have just finished reading:

Pocket Island by Charles Clark Munn (1848 - 1917)

This is a free download from Librivox, and I listen to these talking books whilst model building.   This one starts in the 1840s with a story of smuggl;ing off the coast of Main, continued through the American Civil War, and ending again on Pocket Island.   A grand tale of adventure.     This is the final paragraph, which is very true, and sums up my own feelings at the age of 75:

 

Life at best is but an enigma, and like children pursuing a Will-o-the-Wisp, so do we all pursue the illusive beacon light of a brighter and happier to-morrow-always hoping, never attaining, though striving ever until, wearied of the vain pursuit, at last we fall by the wayside and are forgotten.

 

One feels F Scott Fitzgerald was perhaps not unacquainted with this work.  Here are the last 2 paragraphs of The Great Gatsby:

 

"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us.  It eluded us then, but that's no matter - tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms further... And one fine morning -  

 

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

 

 

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I was planning to go for this one as my next read, ideal to get along my HH-46 build for the STGB....

 

46_dri10.jpg&key=6b40838d8f1dbc656ab1a74

 

But sometime, things don't happen exactly as you planned for them.

And nothing can stand between me and a Top Gun book.

 

kin_to10.jpg

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On ‎2‎/‎27‎/‎2019 at 9:14 AM, FalkeEins said:

Jonathan Littell's  " The Kindly Ones "...historical fiction that won lots of prizes and a recommendation from Anthony Beevor on the cover  - a gripping but dreadful book ..

I've had that in my book stash for some years, now, unread.  I'll make a start on it when I finish my current read which is 'The Last Days of George Armstrong Custer' by Thom Hatch.  An interesting book, Hatch does not belong to the 'Custer was an arrogant fool' school of thought.  HIs premise is that Custer's plan at the Little Big Horn could have succeeded if his subordinates (Reno and Benteen) had done their part.  He principally accurses Reno of cowardice and Benteen of negligence.   Hatch puts forward a good case, but there are still questions to be answered.

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On 3/9/2019 at 11:54 PM, Antoine said:

But sometime, things don't happen exactly as you planned for them.

And even then, things might happen differently than those you don't planned, etc....

 

Well, I just received a new book, so "46 Driver" might wait a bit more.

 

 

"Stories of the 11e Escadre de Chasse".

Stories, not story.

The book's build nearly as Grub Street's serie "The xxxx boys", the difference being the highest number of pages, with thus more stories, but of different sizes..

The 11 used F-100 and then Jaguar, and saw much action in Africa during the 70's/80's.

 

histoi10.jpg

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On 2/19/2019 at 8:09 PM, Mr T said:

Started a new book to fall asleep over, 'The Moonstone' by Wilkie Collins. I have heard a fairly good radio adaption, but have never got to grips with the book, that has been regarded as the first  'modern' detective fiction novel. Like a fair few Victorian writers etc. Collins had an 'interesting' private life, with at least two concurrent mistresses. 

A classic. Stick with it!!

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On 3/10/2019 at 1:37 PM, 593jones said:

I've had that in my book stash for some years, now, unread.  I'll make a start on it when I finish my current read which is 'The Last Days of George Armstrong Custer' by Thom Hatch.  An interesting book, Hatch does not belong to the 'Custer was an arrogant fool' school of thought.  HIs premise is that Custer's plan at the Little Big Horn could have succeeded if his subordinates (Reno and Benteen) had done their part.  He principally accurses Reno of cowardice and Benteen of negligence.   Hatch puts forward a good case, but there are still questions to be answered.

And he's not far wrong. Benteen saved Reno,killed Custer.

On 2/19/2019 at 8:09 PM, Mr T said:

Started a new book to fall asleep over, 'The Moonstone' by Wilkie Collins. I have heard a fairly good radio adaption, but have never got to grips with the book, that has been regarded as the first  'modern' detective fiction novel. Like a fair few Victorian writers etc. Collins had an 'interesting' private life, with at least two concurrent mistresses. 

A classic. Stick with it!!

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John Grisham - The Appeal. I know it's fiction, but it's frightening how big business can buy whatever they like.

 

John.

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