Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

CrazyCrank

Pocher Bugatti T50 Coupé de Ville: a resurrection

Recommended Posts

Arni "I want to run off with that engine and go to Gretna Green!"

Gretna Green the village or the famous "bar" in Dusseldorf ? :winkgrin:;);)

Edited by sharknose156

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given that you were insisting....

The firewall's carrier side has been given too a facelift ! "Pourquoi faire simple ...."

According to my reference photos of the prototypes, I’ve added some parts

1/ This one, of which I don’t know name nor function, located on the left of steering shaft, that seems to be an electrical device

It’s been scratch-built from styrene rod, alu sheet, two brass tubes and electrical wire, under magnifying glasses, and with an helpfull liter of Coca-Cola !

It is connected , on the ref. photos, to a fuse box (in my opinion), on the bottom left of the firewall.

28746409093_c5644be03a_z.jpg

28518225363_ee081eb76a_b.jpg

28518224493_588a2dff56_b.jpg

29080345230_728303fe23_z.jpg

29367849785_11077d3d2b_z.jpg

2/ The fuse box (or any other electrical apparatus..but I think it’s a fuse box)

It has been scratch-built from styrene sheet, copper wire (0.4 mm diameter), M1brass bolt, yellow paint then clear red paint from Tamiya, decals and a lot of patience…

From this fuse-box run several electrical cables, which are depicted, but not connected, because, of course, nobody can affirm what are their pathway and function !

28744458024_6ae3cdd3e2.jpg29334117096_5ef57de234_z.jpg

29334143546_edb562d1f7.jpg29080494970_decdd65a97.jpg29368055495_3d2eca6e8a_z.jpg28514320664_4dbf15673a_z.jpg

29061502831_29ae4d1d4f_b.jpg

Later, the fuse box has been moved upward, because its previous location was wrong : it would have been too often hit by the front passenger's shoes !!

28744853874_19094e9223.jpg

3/ All the visible part of the firewall, on this carrier side, has been plated with a needed shaped aluminium sheet., as you can see on the last above picture.

4/ The screws that hold the plastic part surrounding the steering shaft hole, will be replaced later by brass bolts.

5/ I'll explain later what are these two cables that cross the fiewall, on the right of the fuse box.

6/ The rubber floor mat which is crossed by the 3 pedals, is, in my kit, very uggly and distorted

28747468893_c27bd745b7_z.jpg

So, I planed to replace it...and I'm on a phase of trials with a new one

Actually, i'm a this point of my work and thoughts....

1/ On the prototype cars, there is NOT rubber floor mat !

2/ Studying the ref. photos, I noticed that it was an aluminium (or any metal) plate, bolted on the firewall, and lengthwise and crosswide corrugated, in order to make it non-slip mat...

3// I searched on Internet (Rougié & Plé, french creative hobbies website, dedicated particularly to architecture students) a material, which, at 1/8 scale, could closely seem to that real mat...and I found this one.

29081422700_acaa06e4ce_b.jpg

This material imitates perfectly, in my opinion, the pattern of an non-slip surface....

I prepared a styrene-sheet-made template, that I adjusted to the exact shape to form.

29061442781_3929138c36_o_(1).thumb.jpg.e

Then, I prepared a plate of standard alu sheet, covering bottom side of this "master".

29106055566_b2254800b2_o.thumb.jpg.96833

29033620362_b636e25911_o.thumb.jpg.8cbac

29061502831_4d606b3014_o.thumb.jpg.70c13

Next, I prepared a plate of the corrugated alu sheet, longer and larger enough to permit covering both sides of the master.

I shaped it onto the master, both sides, drillled and shaped the holes for the 3 pedals, and then glued the 3 parts of the mat: the flat alu master and the corrugated covering, sandwhiching the styrene master...

So, I obtained a malleable but solid mat that only needed some sanding to fit right on the floor.

Fichier_23-08-2016_00_42_58.thumb.jpeg.5Fichier_23-08-2016_00_43_37.thumb.jpeg.eFichier_23-08-2016_01_14_31.thumb.jpeg.1Fichier_23-08-2016_01_15_17.thumb.jpeg.e

Finally, I made a little addition on this "floor matt":

I put on the periphery of the 3 pedal's passage holes, a "bezel", an aluminium cover profile, which give a pleasant decorative finish.

Fichier_25-08-2016_00_55_29.thumb.jpeg.bFichier_25-08-2016_00_59_43.thumb.jpeg.fFichier_25-08-2016_01_33_27.thumb.jpeg.aFichier_25-08-2016_01_35_06.thumb.jpeg.e

And now, I must wait and think before gluing the mat on the firewall's floor and to bolt it (4 bolts....sittings prepared)

In effect, when i'll install the carpetted floor of the carrier, theoretically, if I follow the kit's instructions, the front of the carpetted floor must be put below the floor mat of the firewall.

That would be easy if i used the rubber mat, which is very malleable and can be bended...but with this semi-rigid alu floor mat, after having conducted tries, it seems to be more difficult...so, I'll solve this problem later...must sleep on it !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice detail work Thierry.

Your photo's and explanations will be very useful to anyone wanting to detail this tricky and hard to find kit.

Best Regards

Keith.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Incredible work! Your ability to scratch-make little parts is quite amazing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Incredible work! Your ability to scratch-make little parts is quite amazing!

Very kind of you, many thanks !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is coming along quite nicely.

I really like the engine turned metal and that firewall is gorgeous!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I introduced on this forum, I've not,only worked on the firewall, but also on the steering system...

 

First, refering to the prototypes photos, I added a "lever" on the steering gearbox

 

29103860150_d61309c3e1.jpg

 

I don't know what is its usefullness. It seems to be, rather than a lever, a mobile clip which prevents the gearbox cap to get away ???

I've scratch-built it with thin brass tube, M1 brass bolt and alu sheet, then painted it Alu

Then, always according to the reference photow, I decided to modify the steering control arm, that is not very rewarding for this superb model car :

 

28770902733_93a0dceeff.jpg

 

to get this:

28770319973_5381177f12_z.jpg

 

Needed: A big brass washer, alu sheet, 6 M1 brass bolts, Tamiya Putty or Milliput, as you want, sanding files, Alclad Chrome paint, a soldering iron and soldering wire pic

First: I soldered the large brass washer over the "cubic" head of the steering arm, which is hinged on the steering shaft...The washer was soldered on the outer face of the "cubic head", and not yet hiding the hole of the shaft.

Second: I sanded the brass washer to obtain a diameter that was approximatively the diagonal of the squared face of the cubic head

Third: I glued a small piece of alu sheet on the washer, and sanded it at the same dimensions. The hole for the steering shaft was masked !

Fourth: I glued 6 heads of sacrified M1 brass bolts on this ensemble

Fifth: I filled the space between the brass washer and the "cubic head' of steering arm, at its back, on the left and the right, with several successives layers of Tamiya Putty, for rounding the rigth angles between the washer and the cubic head...

Sixth: after a long dry and carefull sanding, I painted the whole system with Alclad Chrome

 

It's not totally achieved ! the illusion is Ok from front view, but very bad from side or upper view.

 

29313289031_9ceaa09533_n.jpg

 

29137222520_bc639b4260_z.jpg

 

29312696241_0d972e3b19.jpg

 

Initially, i wanted to get a cylinder which includes the "cubic head"

I could have done better, certainly should I...too late now, unless my perfection devil catch me up !

 

On the articulation between the steering control arm, and the steering contrrol rod, i've replaced the M2 Screw and nut, by brass M1.6 bolt and nut.

 

29358492006_2f8c6d7377_n.jpg

28768604754_4a0e51359e_n.jpg

Edited by CrazyCrank
disappeared pictures

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Listen Thierry,

The work is magnificent. Remember this important fact; what you can see on the workbenck is seldom if ever seen as clearly and from all angles when in place in the car.

This goes for detail, paint, anything. Sure we all strive to make each part and subassembly a perfect piece of its own. But do not denigrate yourself if less that 1:1 perfection is achieved. I'm sure everyone here is full of envy of your skill and ethic to go the last mile for accuracy and detail. I know I am.

My hat's off to you...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree Codger! And these blasted cell phone cameras and SLR's are getting to be so good, that we tend to focus so very closely to the minute details! In reality, the only way to get a similar perspective is to plop out an eyeball and put it in the front seat of this baby and check out the scenery....

Perhaps Mr. Feldman in your avatar had this talent :)

D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Listen Thierry,

The work is magnificent. Remember this important fact; what you can see on the workbenck is seldom if ever seen as clearly and from all angles when in place in the car.

This goes for detail, paint, anything. Sure we all strive to make each part and subassembly a perfect piece of its own. But do not denigrate yourself if less that 1:1 perfection is achieved. I'm sure everyone here is full of envy of your skill and ethic to go the last mile for accuracy and detail. I know I am.

My hat's off to you...

You're certainly right, Codger...

In french, we often say: "le mieux est l'ennemi du bien", what you say in english: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" :doh:

Edited by CrazyCrank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of stunning improvements here! The control arm looks much better than stock.

I am curious if you have any further thoughts on the floor mat. As you pointed out the carpeted plastic cabin floor has a lip at the front that slides under the rubber mat (if built out of the box). It also prevents easily attaching the body to the floor. You are supposed to bolt the floor to the chassis and then the body to the floor with some very hard to reach bolts. I was thinking about sawing off the lip and gluing it to the firewall/mat so the body can be easily dropped on in one piece. My worry is dealing with that gap that creates.

Rich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of stunning improvements here! The control arm looks much better than stock.

I am curious if you have any further thoughts on the floor mat. As you pointed out the carpeted plastic cabin floor has a lip at the front that slides under the rubber mat (if built out of the box). It also prevents easily attaching the body to the floor. You are supposed to bolt the floor to the chassis and then the body to the floor with some very hard to reach bolts. I was thinking about sawing off the lip and gluing it to the firewall/mat so the body can be easily dropped on in one piece. My worry is dealing with that gap that creates.

Rich

I' m going to make some tries this week-end, and then, i'll think about this problem...

A solution is to glue the new alu floor mat on the firewall AFTER having bolted the carrier floor on the chassis, eventually adding a styrene sheet between firewall and floor mat, to compense the difference of thickness.

I dont know if I'm clear...if not, I'll make a diagram.

Other solution: fold the alu floor mat lengthwise, to get an angle permitting, simultaneously to glue the anterior part of the floor on the firewall, and to slide the carrier floor under the floor mat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am at the airport flying back home and will study your pics in details on the plane.

Stunning work as usual. Great working solution on solving the issue of the firewall 'matt'.

what metal paints are you using please ?

Thanks a mil. for taking the time and effort of posting i such details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am at the airport flying back home and will study your pics in details on the plane.

Stunning work as usual. Great working solution on solving the issue of the firewall 'matt'.

what metal paints are you using please ?

Thanks a mil. for taking the time and effort of posting i such details.

Thanks for the kind comment, Sharknose :popcorn:

My metal paints are Alclad: Alu, Mat Alu mat, Semi mat Alu, White Alu, Polished Alu, Steel, Chrome, Dark Alu and Tamiya Chrome Silver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First try of the night for my new floor mat

I've bolted firewall and carrier carpetted floor on the chassis

Then, presented the alu floor mat on the firewall floor..there was an issue, so...I've modified the inclination angle of the pedals and adjusted the 3 holes for the pedals and the bezels

Then presented once more the alu floor mat on the firewall floor....and all seems OK.

I should add a 1 mm styrene sheet between the firewall floor and the alu floor mat, to compense the level difference, in order the alu floor stands firmly and enable glueing it.

Once glued, the alu floor will be in close contact with the carpetted floor...what you cannot see on the next photo, of course.

29304258832_d8803358dc_b.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fifteen days ago, I've made an addition tho my car:

I've installed some electrical cables, according to the reference photos you can find on Paul Koo's DVD and Scalemotocars.com ("http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/showgallery.php/cat/563").


I needed to call on my overflowing imagination to understand what I can do with them,

And finally I decided, rightly or wrongly that the two red power cables that you can see coming out the electric starter are:

- first: the one which comes from the ignition switch on the dash

- second: the one which comes from the battery (I'll install a battery replica later, under the passenger front seat)

And, concerning the black power cable you can see coming out the dynamo:

- It goes to the battery (via a regulator, not represented yet on my pictures) to charge it.

At last, there's another black cable which join the future battery with all electrical accessories and magneto in front of the car (firewall sector).

All cables are made of fine electrical cord of 1.4 mm diameter, which is an acceptable size for 1/8 scale, considering these are not really cables, but outer rubber sheath for the electrical cords.

All these cables are fastened on the chassis or joined together with thin ribbons (1 mm) of electrical black rubber tape...several should be replaced because they don't glue..

I think it's possible that exist errors in this electrical diagram, because I'm an ignorant in electric functionning of a car....If somebody can and want correct my delirium, I'll be happy to modify my work.

29413531475_df25f620f0_z.jpg

29333809131_8c05373746_b.jpg

29413682965_d1284c6d75_b.jpg

Edited by CrazyCrank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few hours later, after having mounted temporarilly the steering system on the chassis and trying to turn the steering wheel, I've encountered an issue:

The steering wheel had no effect on the steering shaft, while turning it !

However, when turning the steering shaft manualy, the mecanism worked perfectly and the wheels turned.

I supposed the "nipples" on the brass steering shaft , which prevent steering wheel to turn on empty, were eroded and didn't grip the plastic of the steering wheel...and I was right !

I must fix that...so, I'd an idea...

I took my soldering iron, soldering silver wire, and did this:

29094945266_5636a98d32_o.thumb.jpg.76f8b

Then took files and did that (two nipples) on the drops of solder:

28508943523_bcb1460dfb_o.thumb.jpg.232d8

Then, with a needle file, I made two notches in the steering hole

28508981353_ce8324afc1_o.thumb.jpg.ae43f

29050538811_c4dc016677_o_(1).thumb.jpg.f

A moment later:

28841118950_f8926edf38_o_(1).thumb.jpg.128508988313_e2e3972093_o.thumb.jpg.c0b25

And now, when I turn the steering wheel, wheels turn :thumbsup2:

Edited by CrazyCrank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello happy modellers default_rolleyes.gif

Since the last week-end, some progress in my work :

The firewall is now fitted on the frame.

29322385065_22ab62abc9_o.thumb.jpg.374dc29322368265_4cffd0710b_o.thumb.jpg.4a02929243531981_aa7dbe0b7d_o.thumb.jpg.63d9b29243517881_c5477446f6_o.thumb.jpg.4383d29322353715_80c46da19f_o.thumb.jpg.ff4c028701618203_33acfd3b67_o.thumb.jpg.99af0

The electric cords that come from the battery and the starter has been temporarily installed

28701618203_33acfd3b67_o.thumb.jpg.99af0

The copper lubrication lines that run from the firewall to the engine have been installed too (not an easy job, because see nothing, and no room to work)

28681449233_8e790668e0_o.thumb.jpg.f319328680187734_3853bb80fd_o.thumb.jpg.59b0528681973943_7bd9897858_o.thumb.jpg.f56fc

The linkage that join the firewall (up right) to the distributor has been placed, not functionnal, but the mechanism is simulated

29323128215_e597c11945_o.thumb.jpg.8bb4329215019852_67839cfaec_o.thumb.jpg.5e52a

The copper lubrication line that run from the bottle up and right of the firewall, and goes behind the supercharger is installed too.

It's made from brass tubes, copper rod, M1 brass nuts and CA gel

First I've made a template with thin copper rod, and then shaped the final piece with thicker copper rod

The line is made of two sections, that join behind the steering box

29289401146_2fc644ece2_o.thumb.jpg.a26d029323071535_552cb50f25_o.thumb.jpg.031ed28702204133_84a5e14e60_o.thumb.jpg.7b5a028702219033_600fd94b2e_o.thumb.jpg.2bc09

29137222520_bc639b4260_b.jpg

On the last picture, you can also glimpse the added fuel copper line, coming from the frame right rail, connected on the fuel dispatcher of the carburetors

Better view on next pictures

28801497414_9b927c3e52_z.jpg28801495354_30d8aa436d_z.jpg

Next addition the missing linkage of the accelerator pedal with supercharger and carburetors, entirely functionnal....building step by step, photos and a short video

To see it, stay tuned !

Thanks for looking and constructive criticism

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simply incredible.............................Stunning modelling. WOW!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simply incredible.............................Stunning modelling. WOW!!!

Very kind of you, Neilm :thanks:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today, I post a new enhancement: the building of the accelerator added linkage.

It was entirely scratchbuilt from brass rod, bras tube, M1 brass bolts, washers and nuts.

All the micro-parts has been slowly adjusted, try after try, in order to get for each one: the right size, the right fit, the right orientation, so that the additionnal linkage would be functional.

The brass parts have not been soldered, but glued with CA gel (soldering would have been executed, parts at their place on the engine, and of course, it was impossible without risking to burn all. Moreover, it would have been very difficult to sand the soldered parts, once definitely mounted)

The added linkage doen't existe in the kit. Paul Koo's DVD don' t refer to this system, wich of course exist on the prototype car.

 

I must thank some modellers who post on several other websites the resuslt of their work: they offer to me an inspiration.

So, I've studied the reference photos, searched on the Internet, in order to be the closest as possible of the reality in my "production".

 

Let's go:

 

To make a connector, you can use a brass tube 1.5 mm outer and 0.8 inner diameter.

Press the free end with pliers over a lenght of 2.5-3 mm.

Drill this flattened end exactly on its center with a 1 mm drill, and then cut the tube to approximatively 5 mm long.

Trim and sand to get an oval shape...

I made 4 connectors, what needed for the two linkages.

 

29244936061_dd064eb08a_o.thumb.jpg.8331228702817123_501fac1fd6_o.thumb.jpg.cc00528700818974_bc53b18713_o.thumb.jpg.bad35

 

Installing connector on the levers:

 

On the control levers of supercharger and carburetors, i'd put a pin, made of 1 mm brass rod.

You must thread the hole of the connector on this pin, then place on the set a small brass washer, and then lock the assembly with a M1 brass nut.

Finally, secure the mounting with a micro-drop of CA gel and let dry. Normally, the connector can move on its shaft (the brass pin).

When all's OK, you can cut the excess length of the pin

 

28700832814_11e435c9b6_o.thumb.jpg.7993c28700834714_71ef51673a_o.thumb.jpg.8a37f

 

Next, the most difficult step of this building hab been to mesure and cut correctly the appropriate length of brass rod needed to form each linkage...try and try, and try again...once done, glue a connector on one of the brass linkages

 

29244948331_03df12a85a_o.thumb.jpg.934d7

 

Install this connector on the kit's plated linkage, and glue the other end on the previous connector (the one installed on lever of supercharger/carburetor)

 

28702866513_dfa2cdf6fa_o.thumb.jpg.ccfd6

 

29290057426_ff10cf8baa_o.thumb.jpg.15bb0

 

Once installed the two linkages, all that remains to do is attaching the two connectors on the kit linkage, using M1 brass bolt, brass washers, and brass M1 nut, tighting the nut enough, but not too much, as the system can move freely when pressing the accelerator pedal.

Secure the nuts using threadlock.

 

29244996801_07ef235ca6_o.thumb.jpg.5b3d928700797524_9a5a599962_o.thumb.jpg.cf082

 

29323719435_bc7da0f9c5_o.thumb.jpg.166fe

 

Last but not least, here is a short video of this functional linkage

 

 

 

 

As you'll can see, the assembly is working, well for the supercharger, not quite as well as expected for the carburetors.

I' ll do not try to fix that, can live with !

Edited by CrazyCrank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What great clean precision work.

Also, thanks for the video, and for taking such time to explain. Important for me a Pocherignoramus.

it seems to be a proper Pocher builder, one needs to be one hell of an experienced scratch builder !! hence all the fun i suppose.

Was the movement of the pedal and connectors already in the original Pocher build or was adding the accelerator linkage to make it move your own enhancement ?

in any case superbuild, i hope you publish something ! Much techniques, tip and inspirations to learn from.

Many thanks T.

Edited by sharknose156

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 04/09/2016 at 4:30 AM, sharknose156 said:

What great clean precision work.

Also, thanks for the video, and for taking such time to explain. Important for me a Pocherignoramus.

it seems to be a proper Pocher builder, one needs to be one hell of an experienced scratch builder !! hence all the fun i suppose.

Was the movement of the pedal and connectors already in the original Pocher build or was adding the accelerator linkage to make it move your own enhancement ?

in any case superbuild, i hope you publish something ! Much techniques, tip and inspirations to learn from.

Many thanks T.

Hi Sharknose

In the original build of this kit, there's only a functional accelerator pedal that acts on a vague linkage, retained by a spring which allows the elastic return of the pedal.

Paull Koo's DVD shows how to simulate the acceleration linkage on the supercharger and carburetors, but not the linkage which allows to make them working, while depressing the accelerator pedal.

That's this one I've added, and described in my post..

So this movement is my own enhancement.

As far as I know, there is one modeller who added this linkage on his Bug, but I think he hasn't made it functional.

In all modesty, I'm thinking I'm the only one, at the moment, who produced that.

I've to recognize that I'm quite proud of it....

Thank you for the encouragement.

PS: i'm not an experienced scratchbuilder..I've eyes, tools, some patience, and I take time to mull over ideas, and overall I try to benefit of other builder works.

Edited by CrazyCrank
Revision

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well...for someone who is not an experienced 'scratch builder'....I would say that is an amazing piece of work....absolutely first class.

Regards

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...