Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Sign in to follow this  
KRK4m

Mixed-striped Typhoon I B

Recommended Posts

IIRC the identification stripes (four 12" black and three 24" white ones) on Typhoon wing undersurfaces were introduced in December 1942 and ordered to be removed in February 1944. What's funny they were also introduced on production Tempests (after all Hawker called the Tempest briefly Typhoon II) and the first units flying Tempest from April 1944 (No 3 and 486 Sq.) didn't feel obliged to remove the ID stripes, as the order listed only Typhoon :)

Thus some (not many) Tempests from these two squadrons mentioned above featured in June 1944 "mixed striping", having D-day stripes (three white and two black ones, 18" each) on wing uppersurfaces and around the fuselage while retaining old ID stripes under the wings. Frankly speaking I have not seen any photos of such a/c, but several colour profiles of them do exist (by various artists), namely the JN766 SA@N and JN803 SA@D of No 486 Sq. and JV784 JF@E of No 3 Sq. RAF.

Moreover during my 50+ years of interest in aviation I have also met the profiles of late production (Tempest-tail, teardrop canopy) Typhoons featuring old ID striping under the wings and the remnants of AAEF invasion stripes under the fuselage. Examples are two a/c from No 198 Sq. (RB222 TP@F and TP@Q with unknown serial - both with 4-bladed props) as well as the 3-bladed JP811 MR@K of No 245 Sq. Also the MN570 (big tail, 3-blades) coded @B after W/Cdr Peter Brooker of 123rd Wing is sometimes shown with full AAEF stripes around the fuselage and over the wings plus old ID stripes on the wing undersurfaces.

Could anybody confirm these oddities with any photos? The 4-bladed, large-tailed Typhoon with "mixed" stripes is what I need :)

Cheers

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Michael

An interesting query. My interest in aviation spans the same sort of period as your own and my interest in Typhoons was sparked by an article in RAF Flying Review in March 1957. Since then I have seen just about everything published on the Typhoon and Tem[est - and there is a lot of misinformation out there!

The 'mixed' stripes theory seems to have begun with a photo and caption in IPMS Magazine in the 60's(?), which claimed that the Typhoon in the photo (TP-E MN882) had 'identity stripes' beneath the wings. I have an original print and it is obvious that the stripes are in fact D-Day (Invasion, or AEAF, call them what you will) stripes. This idea was reinforced by two other examples you quote; the much copied drawings of 'TP-F, RB222' in Profile 81(which I believe to be totally spurious), and the re-issue of the Frog Typhoon kit with markings for MR-K 'JP611'(MR-K was in fact JP511) based on a tiny photo published in Airfix Mag in 1967.

As you will recall, there was little reference material available in those days and such sources as IPMS and Airfix magazines were not questioned!

Over the years many photos of Typhoons with identity stripes (i.e. the 24"/12" under wing stripes) and have been mis-captioned as 'Invasion stripes', sometimes with incorrect dates or locations. Profiles have been produced by artists who have not done adequate research, often copying the mistakes of others.

You correctly state that the Typhoon identity stripes were removed in February 1944. The instruction omitted to mention the Tempest which was just entering service and carried the same identity markings. Eventually this omission was reviewed and the stripes were removed from Tempests following an instruction on 20 April 1944. By this time only two squadrons were equipped, 3 and 486. There are photos of the latter's aircraft with the stripes, also the wing leader's Tempest 'RB'.

Of the Tempests you mention, JN766 had identity stripes until late April 1944, JN803 probably not when with 486 Sqn as it did not reach them until 17 May 1944. The JF-E of 3 Sqn was NV724 (thought to be NV784 for many years in the 60s and 70s) and was not delivered until January 1945 and therefore never wore any stripes, although it has been depicted with them).

As for a large-tailed Typhoon with identity stripes ...very unlikely. The first Typhoon with the large tail to leave the production line was MN307, which was delivered on 24 February 1944, more than two weeks after the instruction to remove the stripes. There was quite probably one large-tailed Typhoon with identity stripes - the Hawker trials aircraft, EK229, however it probably retained its original 'car-door' canopy; unfortunately no photos have come to light.

CT

PS. Having opened the TP-F/RB222 can of worms again, I would request anyone pursuing this topic to read up previous Britmodeller posts on the subject first!.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris - thank you for these details. I have read several (hope almost all) posts concerning the Falaise-gap No 198 Sq. Tiffies code colours and I don't want to open the Pandora box again :)

Your theory of using SGM for the "rear" (i.e TP on s/bd and individual letter on port side) codes when removing the fuselage AEAF stripes looks convincing for me. So does the explanation of using the missing (i.e. overpainted by fuselage stripes) codes on relevant cowling sides - TP on s/bd and individual letter on port. This doesn't apply however to the fin codes that appear to be the same (individual) both sides.

Nevertheless on the two widely published photos of No 198 Sq. Typhoons taking off for the Falaise attack http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234960385-109-sqn-typhoons/?hl=rb222#entry1623505the cowling lettering looks inconsistent. You can easily see small TP on TP@V (which is understood for the period when large TP preceeding the fuselage roundel has been overpainted) but TP@Q features a (little bigger) Q in the same place. I can find no reason other than "painter" mistake for repeating the still visible (not to say prominent) individual letter on the nose while the unit codes remained hidden for those several weeks.

Cheers

Michael

PS. I understand that EK282 SA@R of No.486 Sq. painted by John Wood in Blandford/Munson "Fighters 1939-45" with RPs, teardrop canopy, small tail, 4-bladed prop, C roundels on topsides, ID stripes under the wings and AEAF ones elsewhere is similarly spurious as the RM222 TP@F painted by James Goulding within the FK Mason "Profile No.81" mentioned above.

Edited by KRK4m

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PS. I understand that EK282 SA@R of No.486 Sq. painted by John Wood in Blandford/Munson "Fighters 1939-45" with RPs, teardrop canopy, small tail, 4-bladed prop, C roundels on topsides, ID stripes under the wings and AEAF ones elsewhere is similarly spurious as the RM222 TP@F painted by James Goulding within the FK Mason "Profile No.81" mentioned above.

I'm afraid so. The artist seems to have taken his cue from the dreaded Profile 81 which illustrates SA-R 'EK282'. The correct serial is MN282 which was one of 486 Sqn's last Typhoons and never had any stripes when it was with that unit. 486 never used RP and MN282 had a 3-blade prop.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...