Jump to content

As a result of the close-down of the UK by the British Government last night, we have made all the Buy/Sell areas read-only until we open back up again, so please have a look at the announcement linked here.

This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Jimbob_1978

How much for a good compressor?

Recommended Posts

I have a chinese AS-18 at the mo with no tank. Just a cheap un to get me started to see if I'd enjoy the hobby. Its very noisey and can get quiet hot when used for prolonged periods so not ideal.

I'm fairly convinced its the hobby for me so am considering an upgrade. How much should I prepare myself to pay for a good quiet compressor and what are your suggestions?

Thanking you all in advance, James.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on what you want from your compressor.

What pressure range are you using, how long are you using the compressor for in a normal session.

And your approximate budget.

Compressors, like anything that is engineered the price range and specs are very wide.

As an example, If you are after lowish pressure, 20-30psi and are using the compressor for short periods, I would look at something like the Iwata sprint jet, or our version from the same factory the little-jet ( http://www.modellingtools.co.uk/little-jet-compressor-3441-p.asp ) .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It'll be in the low range, I haven't had mine above 20 yet, and I'm only doing 48th scale aircraft kits so its not going to be running for extended periods, mostly short bursts. My biggest gripe with my current setup is the noise, I dont feel like I'm able to airbrush too late into the evening, so it would be nice to have something quieter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get one with a tank, and a decent size one, that way the compressor will only run to top up the tank.

Depends when your spraying though, I have a Sparmax twin and although not that noisy, it probably would sound a lot worse in the middle of the night when everyone is at sleep.

The silent fridge type ones would be the best,if that's when you do most of you spraying, but then it depends on your budget.

As the saying go's you get what you pay for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colin unless you go for a compressor with a fridge type compressor they are all within the same band noise wise. Very approx 50 odd decibels.

As has been said to keep the noise down, also to provide a better air flow, a tank is better. But even there getting a bigger tank entails the compressor

running for longer when it needs to top up.

Mine, a Chinese type, has a twin piston not sure if that fills the tanks faster than a single. Often wondered. Sparmax which I have been told is a better

compressor still has a high decibel rating. They also make compressors for others including Iwata.

With the fridge type compressor the ones I looked at are in the middle to top thirty decibels. But I was horrified just minutes before ordering to find the

size of these compressor types. They are also very much more expensive. Plus they need oil removed and replaced every now and then.

So this was my dilemma as well. Living in a flat even though built to the latest noise reduction standards I was still concerned about being nuisance to

neighbours. So I built a sound enclosure to absorb the sound. Left about 75mm all around the compressor. I used MDF and stuck to it sound insulation

about 50mm thick.

The insulation is that used in sound studios to absorb noise. Found it on Amazon. Has a door at the front also insulated. This is under my work top.

600mm long 400mm deep. The compressor needs ventilation and also it draws in air. On the sides at the rear I provided long slots 75mm wide.

Looked in the enclosure a few times after long sessions and the compressor is as cool as a cucumber. The result has been dramatic. Instead of a

thumping noise the result is a dull hum. During airbrushing I hardly notice. I was very surprised that the enclosure could be so effective.

The local timber warehouse cut the MDF to size. About £20 plus from memory the noise foam about £20 that came in 400mm sq. tiles. Plus some

foam Evostick for the tiles and a couple of clips for the door.

Laurie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dead silent - bottled gas from whoever supplies it locally. Oxygen, argon or CO2. If you go the argon or CO2 route, make sure you have ventilation for 'just in case'. You'll need a regulator and fittings, but whoever supplies the gas should be able to sort that for you. Given the pressure in those bottles, a medium sized one should last for quite a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It'll be in the low range, I haven't had mine above 20 yet, and I'm only doing 48th scale aircraft kits so its not going to be running for extended periods, mostly short bursts. My biggest gripe with my current setup is the noise, I dont feel like I'm able to airbrush too late into the evening, so it would be nice to have something quieter.

As has been said bottled gas is the only really silent way to do it.

Piston compressor noise ratings to me are strange, they are mostly quoted around the same number, but in reality are a lot different. I've got a lot of customers that have the little-jet in places where noise is important. Have sold a lot to people in flats and more than one to a modellers with wives are in the next room! Noise levels also vary depending on where you place the compressor, you can always put them on a large foam rubber mat to dampen the noise. if you need to.

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dead silent - bottled gas from whoever supplies it locally. Oxygen, argon or CO2. If you go the argon or CO2 route, make sure you have ventilation for 'just in case'. You'll need a regulator and fittings, but whoever supplies the gas should be able to sort that for you. Given the pressure in those bottles, a medium sized one should last for quite a while.

You dont want Oxygen, it would become an explosive atmosphere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Serious question here; is Argon not an awfully expensive airbrush propellant? First quote I saw was for £30 for 2 litres at 230 bar + cylinder deposit + VAT (£71 total according to the website). How much coverage would that likely give say in 1/72 scale WWII single engine fighters (that well known SI unit of measurement)?

Cheers

DC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pose a question on bottle gas.

With a compressor this tops up when a certain downward pressure is reached enabling the airbrush always to perform within the limit chosen with the regulator.

With bottled gas the pressure must reduce with use. There must be a point where required pressure at the airbrush, say 20psi, is not sustainable by the bottle of gas.

At what point in the gas bottles life does this occur ?

Laurie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At what point in the gas bottles life does this occur ?

The "common" bottled propellant is CO2, pressure in the bottle is in the region of 800psi & pretty much stays this way until the liquid CO2 has gone, after which the leftover gaseous CO2 pressure declines quickly, so it's steady pressure pretty much to the end.

A common issue with CO2 is unexpectedly running out of propellant while using the bottle pressure gauge to figure what's left in the tank, but the gauge will correctly show a pretty constant pressure until the liquid is done & the bottle is heading towards being empty....

Air (say from a scuba tank) is a different proposition altogether.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...