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The Pocher kit comes with the gears for the steering box so I have used these but fabricated the casing from brass. The only tricky bit was soldering the ribs, I used soft solder and held them in place with engineering clamps and some steel blocks. 

 

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IMG_6488.JPG%20Preparing for soldering.

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I had to machine the case to provide additional clearance for the worm wheel.

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Pump Machining & Fabrication

The difficulty with the pump was threading the top cap as it is so small and only has about 4 threads. I therefore decided to make it in two parts, the threaded bit, the top and soldered the two together, 

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I cant claim that it actually works as there is no seal inside the tube and no valve at the bottom. But I think it looks pretty realistic.

Edited by Engineering Modeller
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Brake and Gear Change LeverIMG_6522.JPG

The image is of the real car that I found on the Web.

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The Gate 

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Shaping the handle

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Winding the spring for the mechanism, I used a violin string.

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This was probably the most difficult part of the build so far, the components were pretty small and the soldering tricky. I wont boor you with how many times I had to re-do the soldering but it was a few!

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Very precise and impressive work that you are turning out here!! It's beyond my skill level but, it's very inspiring and makes me want to get back to the F-40 and do something besides sanding and painting the body!  :rage:lol!

Fabulous work, great to see it back and progressing!

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Hi folks, thanks for the kind comments much appreciated.

 

One of the next jobs I have is to make the leaf springs, the plastic ones that come with the Pocher kit are too weak to support the weight of the brass body. I have been looking for some suitable material but so far have come up with a blank, if anyone has any suggestions they would be gratefully received.

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Hi, there is nothing special about the saw I think it is a small Eclipse piercing saw with some fairly fine blades. Where possible I try and avoid using the piercing saw as I have a habit of breaking the blades and use a junior hacksaw with some eclipse blades if space permits. As for lubricant I don't use anything on the brass but would use a drop of oil on steel, having said this I am no expert and others might be able to advise if a lubricant would be better. 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well I finally obtained some steel for the springs from Reeves 2000 here in the UK. The steel was in a soft state when delivered and you have to heat treat it in order to produce the spring state. 

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It was surprisingly easy to cut and drill , just like mild steel.

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Bent and ready for heat treatment. 

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Using gas propane torch I heated to cherry read and plunged into water. 

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This is the result before descaling and a test of how how hard the springs are!

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As you can see they are extremely hard, the broken leaf was the result of me just attempting a gentle bend and I broke another one when trying removing the scale.  So before I did anything else I tempered the leafs in a domestic oven at 250 deg C for an hour. Then polished and removed the scale before finally heating again and bluing. 

 

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Temporarily mounted. at least they now support the weight of the car! Having said that they are actually far too stiff to act as springs and I am not sure how that could be resolved. Maybe I should have just made a single leaf from spring steel and the rest out of plastic. 

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  • 2 months later...

Brake and Gear Change LeverIMG_6522.JPG

The image is of the real car that I found on the Web.

IMG_6523.JPG

 

IMG_6524.JPG

The Gate 

IMG_6525.JPG

 

IMG_6526.JPG

Shaping the handle

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IMG_6528.JPG

 

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IMG_6533.JPG

 

IMG_6534.JPG

 

IMG_6535.JPG

 

IMG_6536.JPG

 

IMG_6537.JPG

Winding the spring for the mechanism, I used a violin string.

IMG_6538.JPG

 

IMG_6542.JPG

 

IMG_6543.JPG

This was probably the most difficult part of the build so far, the components were pretty small and the soldering tricky. I wont boor you with how many times I had to re-do the soldering but it was a few!

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Please don't leave it so long for your next update, please!. You've done some stunning work, so far.....keep it up mate, I think

you have the utmost respect from every scratchbuilder on here. You certainly have mine!:clap2:

 

Cheers, H

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The suspension you are doing WILL be too strong, but, I applaud you! Hat's off Sir! At least you'll know with certainty that it will continue holding the weight for your lifetime.... and your kids. It may be a bitch to work with, granted, but, the effort is well worth it....believe me!:winkgrin:

It definitely needs sealing and protecting, otherwise rust can very easily set in,...I use Mr Hobby clear metal primer for the natural finish, but if the metal getting painted, it' auto etch-primer (grey).

 

Keep up the good work

 

H

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On 10/4/2017 at 6:04 PM, Engineering Modeller said:

Luckily it worked

No luck here, you are a master. The radiator alone is a feast of scale modelling in metal !

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  • 1 month later...

Folks, I have found some time so I am back on the Fiat tackling the wheels. But before that let me say thanks for the kind comments and Harvey was definately correct the springs are much too stiff but they look the part. It would be nice to have them looking correct and exhibit some suspension but I have no idea how to achieve that.

 

For the wheels I decided yo use some American Oak that was left over from a cabinet I made.  I had originally intended to get the spokes laser cut but then thought I would give it a try on a powered Fret saw, it turned out to be fairly straightforward and by using a small belt sander I was able to bring them to the finished size fairly easily. 

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For the rim I decided to use 6 felloes which gave an angle of 30 deg.

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I glued the felloes using Wicks no nonsense cyno and the rapid activator. It seems to work very well and gives a strong bond.

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The circular one is just roughed out ready for putting on the lathe and turning to finished dia, the extra one is just in case!

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The next photo shows the spokes in the wheel building jig. This was just a piece of scrap ply with a hole of the correct dia. A piece of baking parchment underneath the spokes ensures the spokes don't stick to the jig.

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I used Gorilla glue for the spokes.

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The wheel is then mounted onto a threaded shaft the same dia as the hub and the external dia turned.

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The Front Wheel still needs a bit more sanding but its getting there.

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I will post photos of the others shortly. There is still one major thing to do on each wheel and that is to add a bead plus the securing bolts. These are a couple of photos of the real thing and show the bead, at the moment I am not sure how to make them so if anyone has any ideas I would be most grateful.

 

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