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Halifax exhaust question - which one is right?


Ad2408
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Most pics in Merrick's book "HP Halifax from Hell to Victory & Beyond" show Coastal Command Halifax's with the rams horn exhaust which looking at the instructions appear to be parts 206 & 207. HTH!

Just noticed but surely parts 177 are backwards?!

Edited by Graham T
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There was considerable effort put into getting a fully satisfactory shroud for the exhausts on the Merlin Halifax. The standardised type of exhaust, usually termed saxophone, seen on early Coastal aircraft, was eventually replaced by Mod 487, a four-way ejector shroud. The same style of exhaust can be seen postwar on Lincolns: it has a smooth beginning followed by the actual openings as rearward-facing louvres, in more conventional style. These are represented by part 177, which I agree is not a brilliant representation. I do have a set of the later style, the last type seen on Merlin Halifaxes, which I think came from Freightdog. They can be seen in Merrick on p96, and on the SD aircraft profile on p84, but the best view is probably the photo on p75.

(The term "rams horn" is usually used to describe the forward-facing ones on Hawker Hinds, and a few other late-30s Kestrel-engine aircraft.)

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There was considerable effort put into getting a fully satisfactory shroud for the exhausts on the Merlin Halifax. The standardised type of exhaust, usually termed saxophone, seen on early Coastal aircraft, was eventually replaced by Mod 487, a four-way ejector shroud. The same style of exhaust can be seen postwar on Lincolns: it has a smooth beginning followed by the actual openings as rearward-facing louvres, in more conventional style. These are represented by part 177, which I agree is not a brilliant representation. I do have a set of the later style, the last type seen on Merlin Halifaxes, which I think came from Freightdog. They can be seen in Merrick on p96, and on the SD aircraft profile on p84, but the best view is probably the photo on p75.

(The term "rams horn" is usually used to describe the forward-facing ones on Hawker Hinds, and a few other late-30s Kestrel-engine aircraft.)

Yes saxophone exhausts was the term I was looking for!

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Ok so do we think that 176/177 are the parts I should be using?

Had a look in the merrck book & the picture on page 96 is of a very squashed aircraft, so I must have a different issue to you - thanks for the answers though.

Photos taken in Jan 1945 if that helps?

Thanks again

Edited by Ad2408
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Merrick has done more than one book on the Halifax. I was referring to the latest one referenced above, where P94 has two photos of a crashed Coastal Halifax... In the first edition (Ian Allan) of his earlier work (simply called "The Handley Page Halifax" there is nothing relevant on these ages, in the second edition (Aston) there is the tail of the crashed LL141 bomber.

I'd say that the other exhausts in the kit are not right for the aircraft in the photo, although the saxophone ones were used on many Coastal Halis so might even be right for that one, earlier. The 4-blade props are a bit of a hint that it is a later aircraft. I'm not familiar with the photo of N: which aircraft is it? I guess it is 58 Sq, as the Met units operated Mk.Vs, from where most of the white scheme photos come.

Looking at some of these, I'm not sure but that there isn't another form of exhaust on some of these Coastal Halis, one that I haven't seen mention of anywhere, but I think I'd need some clearer photos.

It is a nice photo for showing how the bomb doors worked - the kit does not have the outer doors open. A bit of knife work allows you to crack these open, move the inner doors slightly further out, and make way for the proper triple-across bomb carriage. Finding the correct stores for a Coastal Hali is another matter.

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