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Finger Hovering Over 'Buy Now' Button - H&S or Iwata


nheather
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Finger hovering over the 'buy now' button but still one dilemma (H&S or Iwata).

This is where I am. Found the H&S 2in1 (Silverline, Infinity) series - had never heard of them before that. They seem great to me because

0.2mm and 0.4mm

Interchangeable paint cups

Easier to strip down and clean

Cheaper spares (you can get two H&S nozzles for the price of a single Iwata one

Seems a no brainer, just need to decide whether I want a Silverline or infinity

Then I started reading reviews and posts and it became a lot murkier.

Now I am sure there is a lot of fanboy stuff going on (apple v android, xbox v playstation, Nikon v canon etc.) but what I did find is

H&S is the best

Iwata is the best

H&S spray well at first but degrade with the years

Iwata get better with age

H&S clog easily

Iwata has better build quality

H&S has better build quality

Iwata more robust

H&S damage easily

So not clear with the exception that whilst I found plenty of negative criticism for H&S I couldn't find bad words said against Iwata.

So this leaves me with a dilemma, should I buy H&S or Iwata. And if Iwata, which one, the HP-C+ and HP-CS seem favourites.

Can an HP-C+ really work as a single brush for everything - from detail through to laying down primer and metallic?

Is the HP-CS good enough for detail.

Has anyone here owned/used both the H&S and Iwata? Some impartial non-fanboy experience would be great to hear.

Cheers,

Nigel

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If in doubt go for cheaper :)

Vallejo are known to clog airbrushes easily. All I can say is spraying Model Air neat doesn't clog my Ultra. So far nothing has clogged my Ultra with Ultimate thinners.

In reality you can't go wrong with either brand.

Edited by Foghorn Leghorn
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I've had a Iwarta TR 1 for about 7 years now, I use it for all aspects from priming to the final coat. I find it handles well as its got a finger trigger and do minimal cleaning.

I think it was a little easier 7 years ago, I didn't read any reviews just saw an advert in a model mag and that was it sold.

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I've had a Iwarta TR 1 for about 7 years now, I use it for all aspects from priming to the final coat. I find it handles well as its got a finger trigger and do minimal cleaning.

I think it was a little easier 7 years ago, I didn't read any reviews just saw an advert in a model mag and that was it sold.

I too have a TR1 which I bought in 2009.. Fantastic airbrush and no problem at all, works a treat all the time and I've only replaced a needle and one set of seals, both of which were my fault .

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I have both Iwata and H&S airbrushes. I prefer my Iwatas others will tell you different. Any airbrush depends on if you learn to use it properly and not on how others use it.

Its your money,your choice, as they say " grow a pair" and buy one, learn how to use it and bask in modelling sunshine happily ever after. :thumbsup:

ps tongue firmly in cheek re growing etc.

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I just reentered the hobby and treated myself with a H&S Silverline 2 in 1. It's my first double-action, gravity feed airbrush. I had a badger 200 and was looking at a Badger Krome. Finally, I went for the Evolution just as it fits better in my hand and spares are much easier to find in Belgium than Badger's. Can't talk about Iwata.

Here are my two cents:

- VERY easy to disassemble and clean up

- soft metal needle/nozzle, I think it will need more frequent replacement parts (bent the 0.2 needle almost immediately and I'm usually very careful with my tools)

- not very forgiving with approximative thinning ratio's, clogs easily even with the 0.4 needle set

- BUT strangely, seems to work better with acrylics (gunze) than enamels (humbrol), it surely is up to me (I just began trying out acrylics, beginner's luck?)

- paint was not coming out immediately/regularly until I unscrewed the part fixing the needle joint and screwed it back "gently" (it was tightened like mad). I had to replace the paint cup joint from the start (leak at the base of the cup)

So I was at first disappointed but after adjustments (to the device and it's owner habits) I must say that it works like a charm.

All in all, a very good tool but still quite "touchy".

Hope this helps.

PS: on the Silverline, you have to unscrew the protective cap to clean a clogged tip but there is another two pronged model available. Beware it's a fully different nozzle set (it's the one that's standard on their Chrome series). Should have bought this one.

Edited by PattheCat
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I just reentered the hobby and treated myself with a H&S Silverline 2 in 1. It's my first double-action, gravity feed airbrush. I had a badger 200 and was looking at a Badger Krome. Finally, I went for the Evolution just as it fits better in my hand and spares are much easier to find in Belgium than Badger's. Can't talk about Iwata.

Here are my two cents:

- VERY easy to disassemble and clean up

- soft metal needle/nozzle, I think it will need more frequent replacement parts (bent the 0.2 needle almost immediately and I'm usually very careful with my tools)

- not very forgiving with approximative thinning ratio's, clogs easily even with the 0.4 needle set

- BUT strangely, seems to work better with acrylics (gunze) than enamels (humbrol), it surely is up to me (I just began trying out acrylics, beginner's luck?)

- paint was not coming out immediately/regularly until I unscrewed the part fixing the needle joint and screwed it back "gently" (it was tightened like mad). I had to replace the paint cup joint from the start (leak at the base of the cup)

So I was at first disappointed but after adjustments (to the device and it's owner habits) I must say that it works like a charm.

All in all, a very good tool but still quite "touchy".

Hope this helps.

PS: on the Silverline, you have to unscrew the protective cap to clean a clogged tip but there is another two pronged model available. Beware it's a fully different nozzle set (it's the one that's standard on their Chrome series). Should have bought this one.

This is example of what I can talk about. I can find posts saying that Iwata are great and I can find posts saying that H&S are great.

The differences comes with critical comments - I can find them for H&S but hardly any for Iwata.

By the way, I just sold a TR1. It was really bought because my son liked it but when he subsequently showed no interest it got shelved because I didn't really like the pistol trigger - some love them, I didn't.

Has anyone got an HP-C+ or HP-CH. What do you reckon? Does it do everything or do you used a different AB for priming and basing? And what about the size of the paint cup, does it get in the way with doing detail stuff?

Cheers,

Nigel

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Iwata:

If this helps, I know someone with an Iwata who cant get on with his. No idea why. He is a good and experienced modeller. So, yes, there are folks who struggle with a brand for whatever reason. That being said, I know many that have Iwata products and love them to bits.

Your results will really depend on practice and learning the thinner/paint/air pressure ratios that work for you and your brush. Sorry about repeating what others have said, but it is so very true.

I couldn't get on with MM acryl. Vallejo Model air was good, especially with a few extra drops of the clear thinner. Tamiya or Gunze. AQ were fantastic. But I used more thinner vs paint and lower pressure than others might I think. That may not work for you. Also some paints cant take that treatment.

Mr. Paul Budzik did a fine video on primers and why you should use a spray gun for primers rather than these types of brushes. Again, sorry if you have seen this already.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_-v7-Wp6no

Some folks may suggest an add on spray head. No experience with those.

Any chance you can go to a local art store / hobby store/ hobby show and see how the different brushes feel in your hand/trigger action? What point spending the money if you do not like the ergonomics?

Edited by Av8fan
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Any chance you can go to a local art store / hobby store/ hobby show and see how the different brushes feel in your hand/trigger action? What point spending the money if you do not like the ergonomics?

I applied the same "tactics" when buying an airbrush as i do with a new camera.

Choose some that fit all of your basic needs (or can be upgraded with accessories), see it in the flesh, and If you feel it fits your hand like it was meant for you, then buy it from a well known supplier who can deliver spares and service. No need to go for the so said "top notch one" just because someone else said to. It's personal!

PS: and take the necessary time to "make friends" with new gear. Friends work better together, just a matter of knowing each one's strong points and weaknesses. .

Edited by PattheCat
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I have both the Iwata HP-C+ and the H&S Silverline 2 in1.

In practice I find very little difference between them when actually spraying.

I haven't used the .4mm H&S needle so can't comment on that. Perhaps that in itself says something...

The Silverline is somewhat easier to disassemble for cleaning due to the nozzle design, but it's not like the Iwata is at all difficult either, you just need to take care with the nozzle.

I bought the HP-C+ in 2005, and the H&S in 2014. The H&S hasn't replaced the Iwata and I still do most of my spraying with the Iwata, the H&S simply wasn't so very much better to cause me to retire the HP-C+.

If you can handle them in the flesh first, that might help you decide. Either way, you wont be disappointed whichever you get.

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see it in the flesh

That would be great, doesn't really help with how perform and what they will be like in a year, but certainly allows you to feel the weight, balance, trigger action etc.

The difficulty is (1) finding a stockist nearby and (2) finding a stockist that carries both H&S and Iwata (not many do)

Cheers,

Nigel

Edited by nheather
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I loooove my Iwata....!

Hick.

Go on, buy both. You know you want to.

They both appear to have pros and cons.

If I could go back in time I MAY have gone with the H&S based purely on price and what you get for your money.

But I honestly can't see me swapping my Iwata for a H&S. I'd buy the H&S as well though.

In actual fact, I may well do that sometime in the future..

I'll start saving.

Rick.

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I have had an H&S evolution silverline FPC for over 7 years now, and although I have had a few replacement nozzles in that time I wouldn't wish for anything else .At that time I knew nothing of the merits of Iwata, and everything I read was raving on about Aztec. Daft as it seems now what swayed my desision was that I liked the sound of the German name.

It sounds now that this seems to have come down to tossing a coin, but what ever you end up with there will be times when it might not perform quite like you expect it to because by their very nature ABs,can be finicky things and you will start wishing that you had brought the other. Is all I can say is dont and stick with your weapon of choice. Like many tools I have they seem to get better with age and become an extension of your hand.

On the question of the H&S nozzle problem, I am sure now that 9 times out of 10 the splitting is caused by trying to force the needle through a slightly blocked nozzle. Every time I clean it now I have a very cheap pair of those Ebay magnifying glasses.holding the nozzle up to the light you will amazed how much gunk can be stuck up there , I never try to get it out with a cleaning needle or brush instead soak in lacquer thinners for a while and give the blunt end a sharp tap on a hard table. maybe some would dispute that but it seems to work for me

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I have had an H&S evolution silverline FPC for over 7 years now, and although I have had a few replacement nozzles in that time I wouldn't wish for anything else .At that time I knew nothing of the merits of Iwata, and everything I read was raving on about Aztec. Daft as it seems now what swayed my desision was that I liked the sound of the German name.

It sounds now that this seems to have come down to tossing a coin, but what ever you end up with there will be times when it might not perform quite like you expect it to because by their very nature ABs,can be finicky things and you will start wishing that you had brought the other. Is all I can say is dont and stick with your weapon of choice. Like many tools I have they seem to get better with age and become an extension of your hand.

On the question of the H&S nozzle problem, I am sure now that 9 times out of 10 the splitting is caused by trying to force the needle through a slightly blocked nozzle. Every time I clean it now I have a very cheap pair of those Ebay magnifying glasses.holding the nozzle up to the light you will amazed how much gunk can be stuck up there , I never try to get it out with a cleaning needle or brush instead soak in lacquer thinners for a while and give the blunt end a sharp tap on a hard table. maybe some would dispute that but it seems to work for me

When I service customer brushes, I now use a small 10x magnifier and micro brushes with a little bit of cleaner on the end.

With the magnifer you really can see the full length of the nozzles internals.

It works quite well those times there is paint or gunge in the nozzle and the micro brushes are soft so things don't get damaged.

Paul

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I've had a few different brands of airbrushes over the years, started with Badger then onto Aztek and finally onto Iwata. I now have 3 working Iwatas however my HP-C+ is the one that does most of the work and I've never had to replace anything on it in the years I've had it. My Custom Micron is for very fine work (I did have to replace the nozzle on that but the damage was due to my ham-fistedness) and I bought an Eclipse CS to use with primers which is a very robust and simple airbrush to strip down and clean.

I second all the other comments saying you can't really go wrong with either brand so long as you learn how to use the brush you buy. Don't expect miracles when you first fire the thing up, it took me ages to master the Custom Micron for example, but keep plugging away and take notes as you go so you can refer back to them when something doesn't work out as well as it did the time before or when it works really well and you want to be able to repeat that.

Duncan B

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Don't expect miracles when you first fire the thing up, it took me ages to master the Custom Micron for example, but keep plugging away and take notes as you go so you can refer back to them when something doesn't work out as well as it did the time before or when it works really well and you want to be able to repeat that.

Duncan B

Duncan,Im also taking an age to master my Custom Mi.cron and have to say its not a beginners brush by any means. At £300+ its an investment Im really going to have to work at. LOL

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I gave up on it for ages when I initially couldn't get on with it but I got there in the end. It does go to show that results aren't guaranteed by just spending more money.

Duncan B

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