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bentwaters81tfw

Filters

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I spoke to my photgraphic supplier on saturday, about a new zoom lens, and bemoaned having to part with some old ones when digital came along. The old lenses were brilliant, but left a blue cast on the images. I always use a Skylight filter as a lens protecter. Ah! says the Guru, digital cameras don't like them, it confuses the sensor; either use a standard U/V or a plain filter. Sooo.. after shelling out for a new super-dooper high speed full frame ready 450mm zoom, I have just bought some new U/V filters for all my lenses. I will see if the new kit gives me better results.

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A polarising filter will help you get nice blue skies at airshows & for landscapes, but there's a lot of conjecture about the efficacy of UV filters other than as a lens protector, however at worst it'll do no harm, just in case you try & scratch it one day ;)

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Ah, but will it stop me taking crap pictures? A polarising filter was the other option, but in reality, it's there to protect the lens. Pentax lenses have a multitude of coatings as standard.

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I use a UV filter [always have done] as a lens protector. A chip out of a £10 filter is better than out of a £450 lens. [has happened, more than once too]

We don't have enough UV light in the UK to notice the effect of the filter, in the Med and USA its more noticeable.

The best polariser to use is a circular one - not the shape - the way it works. Most polarisers are linear.

I rarely ever use one anymore.

Really, depending on your digital camera it should not have been showing a blue cast. The AWB would have eliminated it.

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A high quality filter with good coatings will at best do no harm to your image quality,

but better would be to use a dedicated lens hood which will in most circumstances cut down on unwanted flare on

your front element and also offer protection from knocks.

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I think the debate on UV filters on digital cameras will go on forever... yes they helped in the film days but not now with digital.

 

I always keep my lens hoods on and the right way around unlike a lot of people do... and don't carry a camera around your neck with the lens pointing forward always better to carry it off the shoulder with lens behind you... if you're walking forward if you was to bump into something you'll only hit the body, which if it has a magnesium body like some do it won't do much at all... i've knocked mine into many walls and it's still going strong years later.

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