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ErikB

RAF pilot's flying kit - differences early - late war?

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Hi guys,

In 1/32nd some figures can be found for Spitfires and the like but they are labelled as "Mid-Late War". I would be interesting in fitting a pilot in Revell's Spitfire Mk. II, built as an early 1940 Mk. I.

So what are the differences in flying kit? Any pointers to books or websites dealing with this are very welcome too!

Cheers,

Erik.

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Hi Erik, for a pilot in 1940 there are quite a few options for flying clothing. Flying suits were popular with pre-war flyers and were a set of cotton overalls which came in white, tan and black. Then there are sidcot flying suits which are thicker and are tan coloured. Typically you will also see RAF pilots in what are known as 'Number ones' these days which is the belted tunic and trousers combination.

A type B flying helmet plus a 1932 pattern Mae West would be the norm. Maybe 1936 pattern flying boots or service shoes.

Here is a photo which shows a few various types:

http://www.aeroleatherclothing.com/photos/3645342b2fae446e_Prestige%20Douglas%20Bader.jpg

The mid-war flying clothing is slightly different as it includes 'Battle dress' and 1941 pattern mae wests. These were yellow whereas the earlier style was green when issued and faded to a tan colour.

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Thanks!

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I'm not sure if it's relevant but the early style Type D face mask (canvas) and oxygen tube (thin and covered in woven cloth) was different from the later Type E which was a rubber mask with a wider ribbed rubber oxygen tube.

This might be of interest...

Cheers,

Stew

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I'm not sure if it's relevant but the early style Type D face mask (canvas) and oxygen tube (thin and covered in woven cloth) was different from the later Type E which was a rubber mask with a wider ribbed rubber oxygen tube.

This might be of interest...

Cheers,

Stew

Brilliant, Stew, thank you!

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Wow, great Mike!!

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