Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Sign in to follow this  
WildeSau75

Right wash for my 1/72 F4U-5 Corsair

Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

I am a newbie and working on my 1/72 F4U-5 Corsair and I am done with the paint job - overall DGSB (overall dark glossly sea blue).

I now want to give it a wash. Can you guys please me a hint:

- what wash (color wise) is used best on the DGSB?

- how is the wash done (what is required)?

I have never worked with a wash so far and therefore I am happy if I get a step by step instruction.

TIA.

Cheers,

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While most folk still seem to use artist's oils, thinned with turpentine or whatnot, there are lots of specific products around now. Flory washes seem quite popular, but recently I had a look at the Ammo Of Mig Jimenez 3-colour wash sets for silver/NMF and US Navy Grey colours. These work very well for me, are easy to apply and remove with white spirit (so make sure you seal any enamel paint surfaces with acrylic varnish first!). The pigment is exceptionally fine, much better than oils I've tried, which always seem to remain rather coarse and gritty. There is an online tutorial for these somewhere also.

The product range is structured around base paint colours, and there is a Dark Sea Blue specific type:

http://www.migjimenez.com/en/aircraft-panel-line-wash/372-plw-dark-sea-blue.html

A further advantage is that these are ready-mixed, just slosh them straight on -they need constant stirring while using, though!

HTH.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael this might not be to your taste but here's my corsair built last year, I always make my own wash with a suitable acrylic paint(in this case

a very light gray).. pour a little of your chosen colour in a jar,add water to make it the consistency of tea or coffee and add a couple of drops of

washing up liquid and then just brush it into the panel lines leave to dry for ten minutes and then remove with a just moist cotton bud or kitchen

paper towel,it comes off the surface but stays in the panel lines.Make sure the model is well glossed first which most people do for decalling.

http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234976193-korean-war-corsair172-revell/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While most folk still seem to use artist's oils, thinned with turpentine or whatnot, there are lots of specific products around now. Flory washes seem quite popular, but recently I had a look at the Ammo Of Mig Jimenez 3-colour wash sets for silver/NMF and US Navy Grey colours. These work very well for me, are easy to apply and remove with white spirit (so make sure you seal any enamel paint surfaces with acrylic varnish first!). The pigment is exceptionally fine, much better than oils I've tried, which always seem to remain rather coarse and gritty. There is an online tutorial for these somewhere also.

The product range is structured around base paint colours, and there is a Dark Sea Blue specific type:

http://www.migjimenez.com/en/aircraft-panel-line-wash/372-plw-dark-sea-blue.html

A further advantage is that these are ready-mixed, just slosh them straight on -they need constant stirring while using, though!

HTH.

Thanks a lot - this helps indeed. I will have a look at these products.

Regards,

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael this might not be to your taste but here's my corsair built last year, I always make my own wash with a suitable acrylic paint(in this case

a very light gray).. pour a little of your chosen colour in a jar,add water to make it the consistency of tea or coffee and add a couple of drops of

washing up liquid and then just brush it into the panel lines leave to dry for ten minutes and then remove with a just moist cotton bud or kitchen

paper towel,it comes off the surface but stays in the panel lines.Make sure the model is well glossed first which most people do for decalling.

http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234976193-korean-war-corsair172-revell/

Thanks a lot Steve - your Corsair looks great. I was thinking to use a darker than GSB wash - which would be almost black then - but seeing your grey wash makes me re-thinking...

What was your reason to not use a dark wash?

No matter of the color question, your detailed description of the process is exactly what I required - thank you.

Cheers,

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For my washes I tend to just use a watered down acrylic, just add water until you get the consistency you like and brush it on not too little but not too much as too much it will pool. Watch it as it dries and make sure no pooling occurs if it does occur dap up the excess with tissue. The colour I would suggest it matt black.

Hope this helps,

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a simple water color set to make my washes these days. For a few pounds you get a dozen colors and you can quickly mix up any others.

I've used dark washes on Navy blue kits but it doesn't really show, I like the kit posted above with the gray wash, I'll try that next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said, a black wash on a GSB plane isn't really going to do much. Think of dirt/dust/grime on a dark colored car: it generally looks lighter than the paint. You don't really need a wash at all IMHO, but if you decide to use one, then some sort of gray makes more sense. I think Steve did a really nice job on the model he posted above. I would personally go somewhat more subtle, which means make sure the wash is plenty diluted, and bring it up gradually with successive applications, stopping perhaps while you still think it's not quite enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Michael.I sometimes use lighter washes just to see what result,s I get especially on dark coloured airframes Heres a light tan wash on an Olive

green scheme.2813bc73-cae9-4a4b-b031-cee2c34e24a3_zps

and the before and after of a dark wash mixed the way I described

SDC12468800x600_zps084d58c3.jpgSDC12471800x600_zps04e822f5.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For my washes I tend to just use a watered down acrylic, just add water until you get the consistency you like and brush it on not too little but not too much as too much it will pool. Watch it as it dries and make sure no pooling occurs if it does occur dap up the excess with tissue. The colour I would suggest it matt black.

Hope this helps,

J

Thanks Modelfreak - will give it a try.

Cheers,

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a simple water color set to make my washes these days. For a few pounds you get a dozen colors and you can quickly mix up any others.

I've used dark washes on Navy blue kits but it doesn't really show, I like the kit posted above with the gray wash, I'll try that next time.

Make sense I guess - thanks. Probalby I will use a dark wash around the engine and the grey wash for the rest of the plane.

Cheers,

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said, a black wash on a GSB plane isn't really going to do much. Think of dirt/dust/grime on a dark colored car: it generally looks lighter than the paint. You don't really need a wash at all IMHO, but if you decide to use one, then some sort of gray makes more sense. I think Steve did a really nice job on the model he posted above. I would personally go somewhat more subtle, which means make sure the wash is plenty diluted, and bring it up gradually with successive applications, stopping perhaps while you still think it's not quite enough.

Thanks Seawinder - without a wash I fear it's gone look a bit uniform. Therefore will give it a try. And yes, I know what you mean by the dirt on a dark colored car looking lighter - got it ;-).

Let me try it out!

Cheers,

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Michael.I sometimes use lighter washes just to see what result,s I get especially on dark coloured airframes Heres a light tan wash on an Olive

green scheme.2813bc73-cae9-4a4b-b031-cee2c34e24a3_zps

and the before and after of a dark wash mixed the way I described

SDC12468800x600_zps084d58c3.jpgSDC12471800x600_zps04e822f5.jpg

looks very convincing - love the way the Spit turned out. Thanks Steve - that's a good example.

Will give it a try!

Cheers,

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Seawinder - without a wash I fear it's gone look a bit uniform. Therefore will give it a try. And yes, I know what you mean by the dirt on a dark colored car looking lighter - got it ;-).

Let me try it out!

Cheers,

Michael

Well, GSB planes did tend to look somewhat uniform. I think the glossiness helps keep them from seeming monotonous. However, by all means go for it with the wash. I'll just reiterate my opinion that less is more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tried a couple of techniques on a FAA Hellcat II. Washed in dirty black - thin mix of black and dark earth - goes sort of a Khaki colour. Also I dabbed some of the panels with a dark purple Acrylic straight from the tube. Then gave it a good hard rub so that there was virtually none left. It actually works quite well with only a hint of purple left behind..

If I can figure out how to get pictures on here I'll show you...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tried a couple of techniques on a FAA Hellcat II. Washed in dirty black - thin mix of black and dark earth - goes sort of a Khaki colour. Also I dabbed some of the panels with a dark purple Acrylic straight from the tube. Then gave it a good hard rub so that there was virtually none left. It actually works quite well with only a hint of purple left behind..

If I can figure out how to get pictures on here I'll show you...

Thanks Beema, that helps.

Cheers,

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×