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I'm rather pleased with this one:

Diamond T 968/ William Bros 'SnoFlyr' rotary snowplough.

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Used by the RAF from about 1943, originally developed for the US Navy, these were versions of a civilian highway model, themselves versions of a railway design.

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The chassis was cut a little shorter at the front, and obviously the winch & front bumper assembly left off. The support frame assembly was scratch-built.

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The Rotary Snowplough was scratch-built using plasticard and microstrip and rod. There are some pictures on the web of this unit attached to a FWD HAR-1, and I used these pics and a copy of January 1946 edition of Popular Mechanics (bought on the web) to produce a scale(-ish) drawing.

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The engine cover on the rear was again scratch-built using plasticard. Most of the RAF examples had a Coventry Climax R6 engine to power the snowplough, through a transfer case, and provide hydraulic power for the controls and lifting gear.

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The chap was from one of the many Airfix RAF vehicle sets. I reshaped head and hands to represent a woolly hat and gloves, and added a tissue paper(+PVA glue) leather jerkin (the famous 'Don R'), on which I tried to represent the wind.

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The colour scheme is basically US Olive Drab, mixed to Mike Starmer's spec. At this stage of the war the RAF didn't re-paint vehicles until they needed it- so most RAF vehicles would've been in the colours they were supplied in.

I sprayed Humbrol Glosscote over it, applied the decals and a light blackwash, and finished with a coating of Humbrol Mattcote. I did a quick dusting of artists pastels to get the snow effect.

The base was a spare piece of cotton glued onto the base and covered in a filler called 'OneTime' this is a lightweight decorators filler (uses micro balloons) designed to fill deep holes and dry quickly. AS you can see it dries really white, and rock hard.

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Nice very very nice

Roger

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