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Washes confusion !


Head in the clouds.
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Hi all,

I know there has been some talk here recently about washes but one thing confuses me still and it is this ; I thought enamal and acrylics should not be mixed as the former is solvent based and the second is water/thinners based and the solvent will attack the more delicate acrylic, yet, I see advice saying enamels thinned with weak white spirit over Future which is acrylic is ok.

This is why I will not use washes yet as I am confused.

Could anyone shed light on this for me, I know this will probably have been asked many times before so any replys will be gratefully received.

Many thanks

Gary.

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Future is more of a wax as far as I'm aware and seals the previous layers of paint beneath it, forming a barrier.

If you're still worried, looking at the Flory Models or Ultimate Washes. They're a water based wash in various colours and can be used on top of any paint without reaction. If you've after just a panel wash, gloss coat first. If you're after staining, you can apply direct to matt coat but test this on a scrap model first.

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Ha ha! I'm the same - the stories I could tell of models ruined by my impatience!

I don't know wether it is because I am anal or something but I dread making a mistake and ruining the model but I suppose that will happen from time to time and I will just have to accept it, pity though when you think of all that hard work that ha gone into it.

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I don't know wether it is because I am anal or something but I dread making a mistake and ruining the model but I suppose that will happen from time to time and I will just have to accept it, pity though when you think of all that hard work that ha gone into it.

Same here, and it's probably the same for most, it come with the territory. :) But as the saying goes, you only learn from mistakes

I use a pin wash (or panel wash or filter wash, they're all basically the same) on my models. To be strictly accurate the differences are the amount of oil paint used in the mix, a filter is almost clear in colour, a panel (or pin) wash has a stronger colour tint, dependent on your own style and requirements.

Anyway, the thinners is the important point, I use MIG thinners as it seems fairly mild. My (old) tin of humbrol thinners is much the same . But DO NOT use distilled thinners, it's strong stuff.

I've used Klear, Alclad Aquagloss and Vallejo varnishes on my models and then put an oil wash on top without problems.

Invest in some cotton buds, I use them to wipe away the excess wash. I even dip them in thinners and use them on stubborn wash that won't come off. You do have to be a bit careful at that point as too much scrubbing will remove the varnish layer but you have to give it some welly for that to start happening.

Neil

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Please dont take my word as gospel, but I have found that washes useing normal white spirit will have no effect on klear or acrylic paint finishes and as long as you dont go overboard you can safely use them.. But it will loosen enamel finishes and spirit based varnishes ie humbrol, , have also found that it will loosen Alclad klear kotes. so as long as you seal everything with klear you wont go far wrong

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The use of an acrylic over an enamel before using an oil or enamel wash is to prevent reaction with the base paint. Applying turps thinned wash to an enamel base will dissolve the enamel, ditto an acrylic wash over an acryic base.

I use enamels for painting, then usually a coat of acrylic clear and then an oil wash. However I sometimes use an acrylic wash, in which case I dispense with the coat of clear.

I fancy some of the paint reaction problems people experience is because they dont allow the paint to cure fully. It takes me weeks to paint a model, thus ensuring that each coat has had a fair chance to cure before the next is applied.

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