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nimrod thingie on the wingie


tipper
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Hi guys/gals!

In the middle of nimrod build now. That 'pod' at the leading edge of the starboard main wing with the clear 'cap' - is there supposed to be anything atttached inside? It just looks incomplete. While we're at it, what color do i paint the inside? Sorry if this has been asked before!

Tipper

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As already said its a searchlight. Clear dome with a silver reflector behind it. There must be a bulb at the focus of the reflector, but it is the reflector that is noticeable. I'll see if I have any good photos

George

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It's not a bulb it's a carbon rod and when electricity arced through it you got a tremendous amount of light and heat as a result. We had the same kind of thing on our P-3Bs. Put out 90-million candlepower! I can't recall how it worked but someone will be along soon to explain, I'm sure...

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It was an industrial searchlight manufactured by the Strong Electric Co in the USA adapted for flight use and was indeed two carbon rods striking each other to produce the light. I work for a company that purchased the drawing pack to manufacture parts for the Nimrod fleet back in the day

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There's a guy who occasionally sells a polished metal 'dish' specifically for this kit. I bought one ages ago & stuffed it in the box for a 'one day when there's time' build.

IIRC I paid about £14 for it - I'll try to find the details if you're interested.

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That carbon rod arrangement... once upon a time, it was the way that ALL really bright light was generated - my Dad was a cinema projectionist back in the late '50s (you didn't go to the 'movies', you went to 'the cinema' back then - it was 'an occasion'), and had some experience with them - there was a lot of adjustment required to keep it arcing correctly, as one of the rods was sacrificial and a pit was eroded into it. If you were a beginner, you adjusted them after they'd cooled down (the whole thing got very hot indeed), if you were good, you did it while the film was running, to keep the light even for the cinema goers. I had the experience of playing with a carbon-arc projector in the early 80s, when Dad volunteered with a local chap who ran the part time cinema in a small town close by, and he had 2 of them for Saturday night movies in the local shire hall. I can only imagine what a PITA they were in an aircraft wing mount.

These days, carbon rods are used for arc/air gouging in heavy construction; lots of light, heat and noise, but rapid cutting of big metal blocks! None of this adds to the collective knowledge of Nimrod bits, of course...

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That carbon rod arrangement... once upon a time, it was the way that ALL really bright light was generated - my Dad was a cinema projectionist back in the late '50s (you didn't go to the 'movies', you went to 'the cinema' back then - it was 'an occasion'), and had some experience with them - there was a lot of adjustment required to keep it arcing correctly, as one of the rods was sacrificial and a pit was eroded into it. If you were a beginner, you adjusted them after they'd cooled down (the whole thing got very hot indeed), if you were good, you did it while the film was running, to keep the light even for the cinema goers. I had the experience of playing with a carbon-arc projector in the early 80s, when Dad volunteered with a local chap who ran the part time cinema in a small town close by, and he had 2 of them for Saturday night movies in the local shire hall. I can only imagine what a PITA they were in an aircraft wing mount.

These days, carbon rods are used for arc/air gouging in heavy construction; lots of light, heat and noise, but rapid cutting of big metal blocks! None of this adds to the collective knowledge of Nimrod bits, of course...

It doesn't matter. It's all interesting stuff.

And I still go to the cinema. Never to the movies. In fact, I once asked the receptionist in the hotel where we were staying in the US where the nearest cinema was. She gave me a funny look.

Anyway, back on topic.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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