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robvulcan

Any Tips for Masking inside very small intakes ?

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Hi I would like to learn of different techniques people employ to achieve masking off the intake trunking of very small air intakes.

I have ways of doing it with cocktail sticks and swearing with capacious amounts of coffee.

But There must be other ways.

Pictures welcome if anyone wants to do a tutorial.

Cheers Rob ;)

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Would a very small bit of foam packing material be an option here, Rob?

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Would a very small bit of foam packing material be an option here, Rob?

Foam ear plugs! I tip I saw on another build on here I think!

damp tissue paper pushed in.

All good ideas but I need to achieve a straight edge for the next colour. I have not heard of or used any of these methods before. My curiosity is raised. Only used tamiya tape before.

Cheers Rob ;)

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I would imagine this is for a Avro Vulcan or similar V bomber that has the white intake and camo appearance

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I would imagine this is for a Avro Vulcan or similar V bomber that has the white intake and camo appearance

yes RAF PITA but beautiful style ;)

I just have a few builds planned in other scales and this is the bit I find most annoying as last time I did it on my B2 it took me a day just to mask the intakes. Got me thinking there must be a better way.

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Can you get the tip of a bit of wire in, or the point of a cocktail stick? If you use damp, wet, not dripping wet, tissue paper you can manoeuvre the tissue to make a straight line, being damp it'll grip the surface.

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Can you get the tip of a bit of wire in, or the point of a cocktail stick? If you use damp, wet, not dripping wet, tissue paper you can manoeuvre the tissue to make a straight line, being damp it'll grip the surface.

Damp tissue paper. Interesting What type, I take it once its dry it stays put.

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To be honest using Tamiya tape is probably the best way in the long run, to get the straight line where the white meets the camo and then put some sponge material inside the intakes and then fill over the area with masking fluid

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Damp tissue paper. Interesting What type, I take it once its dry it stays put.

Bog roll or Kitchen type, but not high quality tissue. Kitchen type is about the best as it doesn't break up easily. I stuff it into wheel wells, cockpits, jet engine exhausts.

Wet enough to squish into places, let it dry out a bit, and spray whilst its still wet. Remove when paint is dry. Tissue will probably be dry too. If any sticks on the model, just wet it again and remove. No adhesive to fuss about, or chance of remaining on the model.

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I need to achieve a straight edge for the next colour.

How about reversing the sequence. Camo first then mask off the camo leaving just the intakes exposed then spray the intakes. would be easier masking from the outer edge rather than from the inside edge.

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How about reversing the sequence. Camo first then mask off the camo leaving just the intakes exposed then spray the intakes. would be easier masking from the outer edge rather than from the inside edge.

True good idea but only problem then is the engine faces.

It's a shame I'm not master of telekinesis to move the paint particles that way lol

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True good idea but only problem then is the engine faces.

Plan B then

paint the deep areas of the intakes / engine faces then mask the engine faces and a bit of down stream intake area with a cone of blue tack. Then camo, mask camo and spray intake again same colour as before, blue tack mask can then be pulled out with tweezers and any remnants (if any) with with a bit more blue tack on the end of said tweezers. The first bit of intake paint should feather with the second bit of intake paint without a noticeable join.

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Plan B then

paint the deep areas of the intakes / engine faces then mask the engine faces and a bit of down stream intake area with a cone of blue tack. Then camo, mask camo and spray intake again same colour as before, blue tack mask can then be pulled out with tweezers and any remnants (if any) with with a bit more blue tack on the end of said tweezers. The first bit of intake paint should feather with the second bit of intake paint without a noticeable join.

I was thinking along those lines but the cones of blue tack is a fab idea. You do come up with great solutions mate ;)

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