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POMPEO

A-4C Skyhawk - Falklands/Malvinas 1982 - Hobbycraft 1/48

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Defiantly one to forget the politics on.

Great build, thankyou for posting.

Please keep doing so.

Have been lucky enough to visit both Brazil and Argentina in the last few years , both great countries with great people .....oh and great food.

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Lovely model! I'm a big fan of the scooter and I aim to make one in such a scheme at some point as well.

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POMPEO - That's a great model and I love the subject. I actually have the Has 1/48 A4C kit which, along with a resin conversion set and some 'Aztec' decals, I am using to build this very same aircraft. It's 'on hold' at the moment as I concentrate on getting my Me 262 finished first.

Incidentally, I say this as someone who was actually there in 1982 and saw at first hand the amazing skill of the A4 and Dagger pilots as they made their attack runs. So, forget the politics and any negative comments and let's just concentrate on the main issue; i.e. your superb model. Well done mate!

Gary

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POMPEO. .

How Wondrous to see your models again. :clap2:

Your Skyhawk Is STUNNINGLY GORGEOUS. :heart::wub:

LOVE everything about it ... :wow::yahoo:

KEEP building what your heart desires and likes as there are a lot of very outstanding models coming out.

(Lots of conflict in the world but this is a model hobby)

I wish you would build a 1:24 scale Hawker Typhoon.. just saying :whistle:

KUDOS :mike:

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I just can say Thanks for all your kind words... I'm really happy to know that you aprove it guys... Cheers

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Houstonnnn... Its very welcome Suggest... Unhappilly the 1/24 Typhoon is a bit expensive to my pocket for now... :D :D

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A lovely build, don't worry about tiny inacuraceis, it's good to look at and very pleasing on the eye. Well done, cheers Lindan.

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Now crack on with the Lightning, I am sure that will be excellent.

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Excellent Skyhawk Pompeo, I like the well used/weathered look it has.

Now lets see that Lightning.... :)

Cheers

John

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Great build and finish Pompeo, and as Gary( who has more right to comment than most) has said there has never been any doubt of the bravery and

tenacity of the pilots that flew these aircraft against the task force now over thirty years ago, as a coincidence I have today been at my local museum

where they have on display a Pucara and some other equipment captured at Stanley airport at the end of hostilities.Great model and that,s what we,re

all here for.

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Pompeo, what a superb job, exquisite modelling.

Unfortunately, will always found, without exception, ones that will loose sight of the spirit of the hobby.

Its just model planes, period.

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Incorrect in the most horrible way! Blinkered to be kind to you sir.

(I hope I've covered all I need to, please highlight anything you consider incorrect)

These are the facts as I see them;

In Spanish it is Islas Malvinas, in French it is Îles Malouines, I'm sure other countries will have a name for the place on there own maps which bears no correlation to viscount falkland after whom we named the islands.

We fought a war NOT to dispute the naming of the island group but to "maintain" sovereignty, which was already being considered to change by both the United Kingdom and Argentine parliaments, the falklanders themselves while being British akin themselves closer to those of Chile and Paraguay, English with a twist.

You know, Toast the queen and salute the Union Jack but. . .

The Falklands English vernacular has a fair amount of borrowed Spanish words (often modified or corrupted); they are particularly numerous, indeed dominant in the local horse-related terminology. For instance, the Islanders use ‘alizan’, ‘colorao’, ‘negro’, ‘blanco’, ‘gotiao’, ‘picasso’, ‘sarco’, ‘rabincana’ etc. for certain horse colours and looks, or ‘bosal’, ‘cabresta’, ‘bastos’, ‘cinch’, ‘conjinilla’, ‘meletas’, ‘tientas’, ‘manares’ etc. for various items of horse gear.

Unlike the older English, French and Spanish place names given by mariners, which refer mainly to islands, rocks, bays, coves, and capes (points) important for navigation, the post-1833 Spanish names usually identify inland geographical locations and features, reflecting the new practical necessity for orientation, land delimitation and management in the cattle and sheep farming. Among the typical such names or descriptive and generic parts of names are ‘Rincon Grande’, ‘Ceritos’, ‘Campito’, ‘Cantera’, ‘Terra Motas’, ‘Malo River’, ‘Brasse Mar’, ‘Dos Lomas’, ‘Torcida Point’, ‘Pioja Point’, ‘Estancia’, ‘Oroqueta’, ‘Piedra Sola’, ‘Laguna Seco’, ‘Manada’, etc.

Evolution of Falkland Islander identity

Hon. Lewis Clifton OBE. Speaker, Falklands Legislative Council.

The Falkland Islanders are British by citizenship, and by either origins or naturalization. They are one of the nations and mini-nations of the United Kingdom and the British overseas territories, including also the English, Scottish, Welsh, Northern Irish, Channel Islanders, Gibraltarians, Saint Helenians, Bermudians, Caymanians etc. Along with their common British identity, each of these has its own distinct identity shaped in the respective particular circumstances of political, economic, social and cultural evolution history. According to Lewis Clifton, Speaker of the Falklands Legislative Council, the Falkland Islanders are no exception:

"British cultural, economic, social, political and educational values create a unique British-like, Falkland Islands. Yet Islanders feel distinctly different from their fellow citizens who reside in the United Kingdom. This might have something to do with geographical isolation or with living on a smaller island – perhaps akin to those British people not feeling European."

Besides geographical isolation, the emerging of a distinct Falkland Islander national identity along with the originally undifferentiated British identity was possibly influenced by the devolution processes taking place among the United Kingdom nations:

"The recent devolution aspirations of Wales and Scotland may be a factor. No sociological study has ever been commissioned to try to identify a plausible theory, and therefore it is difficult to elaborate on this emerging dichotomy, but significant sociological change has occurred."

Since the 1960s, the political dimension of Falklander identity has evolved around the campaign for recognition of the Islanders' right to self-determination. Key to this was the formation of the Falkland Island Committee in 1968, Britain's recognition of the right to self-determination after the Islanders turned down the so-called "leaseback proposal" put forward by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 1980, and the new Falklands Constitution enacted in 1985. The constitution vests political power in the elected Falklands Legislative Council rather than the old style colonial governors.

Hon. Mike Summers OBE. Member of the Falkland Islands Legislative Assembly.

A specific regional aspect of identity is the human relationship the Islanders traditionally maintain with Chile and Uruguay,and the well-known Islander rejection of the Argentine sovereignty claim:

"In the Falkland Islands a national identity dynamic also exists: it is constructed upon the Islanders’ desire not to deal with Argentina."

The Falklands War had tremendous security, economic and social implications for the Falkland Islanders. The War opened the prospects for long needed reforms, reversing the demographic, economic and social decline that the Falklands had suffered for several decades. The Islanders became self-confident masters of their natural resources, and managers of a vibrant economy that attracted a wide range of new technical and managerial personnel to immigrate.

The Falkland Islanders consider themselves a nation, the ethnogenesis of which is no different from that of other immigrant nations typical of the Americas, Australia or New Zealand; indeed no different from the case of neighbouring South American nations, as pointed out by Councillor Mike Summers:

"We are as much a people as those in Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil and Chile and many other South American countries whose inhabitants are of principally European or African descent."

TRANSFER OF FALKLANDS SOVEREIGNTY PROPOSED (leaseback proposal)

By Michael Frenchman

Britain is suggesting that the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands be transferred to Argentina, according to a report reaching London last night. The islands, which are in the South Atlantic some 450 miles off the coast of Argentina, have been the subject of a 100-year-old dispute between Argentina and Britain.

This is said to be one of a number of options which are being put to the islanders by Mr Nicholas Ridley, Minister of State in the Foreign Office, responsible for Latin America, who is now in the Falklands.

According to Air Commodore B. G. Frow, of the Falkland Island Office in London, Mr Ridley addressed a meeting of the islands Sheep owners Association and told them that Argentina was getting impatient at the lack of progress in the attempts to solve the problem.

Mr Ridley suggested that it would be in the islanders best interest if they agreed to a transfer of sovereignty. The other options are a 25-year freeze over the sovereignty issue, and a lease of the islands similar to that in force for Hongkong.

Air Commodore Frow said that the lease-back solution, which has been raised before, is the one which is preferred by Whitehall.

A spokesman at the Foreign Office said last night that he could neither confirm nor deny the reports as they were awaiting a report themselves on the results of Mr Ridleys talks.

He continued: There are no proposals as such. The Government has been considering since the April exploratory talks with the Argentine Republic how best to achieve a solution of this difficult problem which would be acceptable to all parties. Mr Ridley is now consulting the islanders to establish their views on a basis for further talks with the Argentines.

When asked if Britain intended to cede the sovereignty of the islands to Argentina the spokesman said they were looking for a solution which everyone could live with.

He added: The important thing is the wishes of the islanders. If they agree, we can explore the possible basis for a solution. However, no solution can be finally agreed without the endorsement of the islanders and Parliament.

The islands Legislative Council is to meet to discuss the propositions. This is the first time that such a package of alternatives has been put to the islanders publicly.

During his meeting with the Sheepowners, Mr Ridley said that another option would be to break off talks altogether but he felt that this might antagonize the Argentine Government. (1980)

To Argentina's military junta, the British government was patently eager to dispose of the Falklands. Thus when Ridley's initiative was mauled in the Commons and talks stalled, the invitation to the Argentinian junta to imitate India's seizure of Goa in 1961 was irresistible. The invasion was named Operation Goa. Even with tension mounting, Thatcher turned a deaf ear to pleas from the Foreign Office to reinforce the islands and deploy ships to the area.

It's a shame this post has been destroyed in such a way, after all those captured spitfires/p47/etc. etc. dressed up as Germans, nobody says a thing that war is over, much like the Falklands/Malvinas conflict, it is over. The chap who posted is Brazilian, I think the language is Spanish or a derivative thereof so for his use of the word Malvinas is completely acceptable because that is how he knows it, I stand by my original post, it was considerate of him to translate it for us.

It seems that only two people fail to recognise this?

The Spanish speakers of the world will always call it the Malvinas!

:rofl:

Selwyn

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"The chap who posted is Brazilian, I think the language is Spanish or a derivative"

Yes, the chap, Pompeo is Brazilian, and his native languaje is Portuguese.

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Painting looks very nice, but where the yellow stripes on the slats?

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Something to do with not affecting the balance on flying surfaces and high lift devices when liberally splashing yellow paint around.

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I think it's correct the slats are left unpainted.

As for me its a bit strange, but its true... I find the photo - you was right, thanks!1930498_zps8bf4e885.jpg

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Really nice work there, Great job !

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Thanks Boys, You make my day... to the minority that are full ofended by it, please give a break...

Gary, see it with his eyes and said that I did a good job, so... I'm really happy...

cheers

Edited by POMPEO

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"The chap who posted is Brazilian, I think the language is Spanish or a derivative"

Yes, the chap, Pompeo is Brazilian, and his native languaje is Portuguese.

Sorry I've never been, I took a wild guess, the languages are very close though. Thanks for clearing that up!

I always thought the two languages were essentially same. It's a Spanish derivative just a few centuries on, maybe that's me being ignorant?

I can only speak English, because I lack the mental capacity to remember things, basically I'm dumb!

(Sorry it's off topic, but it is educational, at least it is for me!)

Hugs n handshakes, j.

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Beautiful Skyhawk Pompeo, I have a C to build myself, having just finished a Q a few weeks ago. (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234962947-148-argentinian-navy-a-4q-skyhawk/)

It's disappointing to see political comments creep in to this thread. Modelling is a perfect way to produce a historical record, striving for accuracy leaves no room for bias, favouritsm or dogma. I suppose it's still such a recent conflict / rivalry that opinion still runs high. Noone makes such comments about Axis subjects from the 40s.

Cheers,

Gareth

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Thanks Gareth, your kind words are very inspirative... thanks for share your build of the A-4B, its on build list for soon... Get your pictures for reference... :)

About Modelling and politics, you reach the point... I agree with you...

cheers

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As for me its a bit strange, but its true... I find the photo - you was right, thanks!1930498_zps8bf4e885.jpg

Just for information that bomb is a spanish made BRP 250.

Selwyn

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