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Aircraft color scheme


wrivera
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This was partly due to the dedication of the RAF in the 60s to 90s with low-level penetration missions. The scheme was a good compromise for these operations. Even then, however, interceptor fighters were often in lighter schemes, baremetal or greys depending upon period. Radar does rule out much of the benefits of visual camouflage away from the ground.

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It wasn't just the RAF. The scheme of dark sea grey/dark green with PRU blue or aluminium undersides was adopted across NATO in the early 1950s, and variations on that scheme were still in use with Italy (Tornado, F-104) into the 1990s and still in use by France (Mirage F.1CR) currently. Until the advent of modern grey jets in the 1980s grey/green was very common.

Personally I'd like to see PRU blue make a comeback :) .

Edited by T7 Models
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It wasn't just the RAF. The scheme of dark sea grey/dark green with PRU blue or aluminium undersides was adopted across NATO in the early 1950s, and variations on that scheme were still in use with Italy (Tornado, F-104) into the 1990s and still in use by France (Mirage F.1CR) currently. Until the advent of modern grey jets in the 1980s grey/green was very common.

Personally I'd like to see PRU blue make a comeback :) .

The French Mirage 2000N and D also still use a grey/green scheme.

The USAF used grey and green for while with the Europe 1 scheme worn by the A-10 and other types, although in this case there were 2 greens. The Luftwaffe Norm83 scheme also adopted these colours.

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Might it just be there was a hell of a lot of paint left over after the war?

No, and for some good reasons: paint was expected to have a shelf life of 2 years, after which the stock had to be inspected and could be approved for another 6 months. 6 months later, the same stock could have been inspected and approved for another 6 months. If non used by the end of the 3 years, the stock of paint would have been disposed of. Stocks of paint purchased during the war would have all been disposed of by 1948.

Besides, the schemes used in the '50s and later did not use the same paints used during the war. Even in the case of schemes that used the same colours (for example Dark Green), the specifications for the type of paint to be used changed constantly during this time. The Dark Green used on a Spitfire in 1945 would have not been approved for use on say a Jaguar in 1975.

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