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GWH MiG-29 9-12 early vs. late?


JeffreyK
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Hello,

who is familiar with the differences between early and late MiG-29 9-12's? I really would like a second kit of the "9-12 late" for having two Polish commemorative schemes side by side, but the kit I've got was one of the last "9-12 late" boxes available at the time and I can't currently find another kit (see my post on the Kitty Hawk Jaguar...).

How big are the differences to the "early" type and could the kit be updated to the "late" type without much trouble (without digging through tons of reference I mean)?

Cheers

Jeffrey

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Seems to be as little as some ventral strakes (on very early 9-12's) and the addition of chaff pods to the later 9-12's.

Others will probably add to this. I wish GWH would re-pop their 9-12 Late.

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Not wishing to hijack the tread but, can I ask what type the much maligned Academy Fulcrum C kit represents or is intended to? I'm getting the feeling that Mig-29's are as complex in version comprehension as the F-16 is.

Also, which type was the aircraft that appeared at Farnborough back in 88/89 ish? I'd love to get a GWH kit but I'm only really interested in a version that saw Soviet Union AF service.

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Not wishing to hijack the tread but, can I ask what type the much maligned Academy Fulcrum C kit represents or is intended to? I'm getting the feeling that Mig-29's are as complex in version comprehension as the F-16 is.

Also, which type was the aircraft that appeared at Farnborough back in 88/89 ish? I'd love to get a GWH kit but I'm only really interested in a version that saw Soviet Union AF service.

Pretty sure the Academy is the 9-12 late.
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Very early series production MiG-29s had the trailing edge of the rudder even with the edge of the vertical fin in an unbroken line. They also had the small ventral fins below the verticals. Most (not all) had the RSBN 'bow & arrow' antenna projecting forward from the small fairing under the nose. Both rudder styles are in the original GWH boxing. I can't recall if there were RSBN antennas or not, but I know the ventral fins weren't there.

Even the very first Fulcrums (Fulcra?) seen in the west, when they went to Finland in 1986, were a mix of "early" and "late" style. Some had ventral fins and some didn't. Some had narrow chord rudders and some didn't. I recall being confused when I first saw the photos of them in the press.

J

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Thanks a lot! Looks like I will be able to make a late type from the new early boxing with not too much effort, especially since I've got the late type kit already for reference and don't need decals.

Hopefully they will land on these shores this time...

Jeffrey

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  • 2 weeks later...

Not wishing to hijack the tread but, can I ask what type the much maligned Academy Fulcrum C kit represents or is intended to? I'm getting the feeling that Mig-29's are as complex in version comprehension as the F-16 is.

Also, which type was the aircraft that appeared at Farnborough back in 88/89 ish? I'd love to get a GWH kit but I'm only really interested in a version that saw Soviet Union AF service.

Yep, the MiG-29 versions are just as complex and wide ranging as the F-16 Block's.

The Academy kit was supposed to be a late model 9-12. Well that was about all that was know about the type at that particular moment in time.

Yes, I hope too that the "9-12 late" kit will be available again soon, just as the 9-13 and the "early 9-12". Lets hope that the re-release of the 9-12 late will see it included the corrected fuselage underside and some other parts too.

The aircraft that went to Finland were all early 9-12's. BUT. One has to know that the early 9-12 was very different from what we know now. In the process of service a lot of conversions were made to the airframes to upgrade them. So you would find a/c standing side by side with many differences. The "short" rudders had a riveted extension before newly manufactured wide rudders became available. The small fins on the underside were removed in some cases but not on every aircraft.

The main identifying features of the early 9-12's were:

- Short rudders,

- extra fins on the underside (included in the kit as an option)

- RSBN (ILS) antenna under the radome (included in the kit)

- early style gun blast shield (provided as an option in the kit, either one can be used)

- flare dispenser (provided as an option in the kit)

- without the flare dispensers one will have to add a "bump" on the wing root that covers the wing fixing point, one would need to "build up" this on the kit

- once again a small conversion that needs to be done is the four piece leading edge slats. Just engrave one additional line to the three part slats given in the kit

- some early 9-12's had the original K-36DM seats with the large headbox (provided as an option in the kit)

- one of the most interesting aspects of the early (very early) 9-12's was the different arrangement of the nose wheel doors. The main doors were much shorter and the "missing part" of the door was attached to the front of the undercarriage leg, pointing forward. There was no mud guard on this aircraft. This was later changed during overhaul and new long doors were added and some aircraft received the typical Fulcrum mudguards. Since this was very early in the aircraft carrier the kit has no parts for this early door arrangement.

- one more thing the auxiliary intakes had a different mesh over the three outlets

- one minor point is that the flap actuator covering on top of the wing was missing on early wings. Just sand it off.

An excellent book on the early 9-12 was published in Russia by enthusiast who collected about all the available photos from the early operational life of the Fulcrum. It is fantastic and well worth getting, unfortunately it is all in Russian but the photos and the drawings are excellent, printed on quality paper.

Please note that many early 9-13's had many of the features of the early 9-12's: short rudders, underside fins, early gun blast . . .

Best regards

Gabor

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Hi Gabor

Do you have any information on the MiG-29 book you mentioned? Title? Author? ISBN?

J

It was still on sale about a month ago in Moscow. It is a private publication by enthusiasts and as such it has not even an ISBN number.

The authors: A.V. Pavlov and S.V. Vojlokov

It was published in 2009

The title: MiG-29 fighter in service units

Izdelije 9-12 First book

Истребитель МиГ-29 в строевых частях КНИГА 1 - Изделие 9-12

There are plans for 3 books in a line and the authors are working on the next book, but it is only a hobby for them so it takes time. I guest that the publication of the next books depends on sales of the first issue.

It has 224 pages, 278 colour photos and 81 black and white as well as 26 three view colour drawings of particular aircraft paint scheme including special markings.

The book takes the early years of service, year by year from 1983, full list of units which used the 9-12 with in the Soviet borders, accident list and all. It is an excellent work from the authors!!! I can only recommend it.

Will have some photos of it soon.

Best regards

Gabor

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Here is the book. I did a review of it for our own publication.

This is the cover of the hardback book:

MiG-291_zps757aed2d.jpg

A couple of pages to show you what there is in the book:

MiG-292_zps250bf6c9.jpg

MiG-293_zps9df3a4b4.jpg

As said before I can only reccomend the book, it is excellent. Now you will only have to learn Russian to read it . . .

Best regards

Gabor

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The next book should be dedicated to the 9-13. Since the 9-12 book Anton Pavlov already published smaller tomes on the MiG-29 SMT of the 14th GvIAP and the Strizhi (Swifts) aerobatics team. I met Anton in Moscow not too long ago, and we were happy to assist him with access to our photo archive on MiG-29 operators in the former Central Asian Soviet Republics (this seems to be a common knowledge gap among Russian authors on the subject). Anton spends time in a professional capacity at Kubinka (121. ARZ, possibly), thus his access to a lot of exclusive archival material on the MiG-29.

www.lindenhillimports.com

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