Jump to content

As a result of the close-down of the UK by the British Government last night, we have made all the Buy/Sell areas read-only until we open back up again, so please have a look at the announcement linked here.

This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

bootneck

HS/BAe First Generation Harrier volume 1: 1960-2000 book by AIRfile

Recommended Posts

Hawker Siddeley/British Aerospace

First Generation Harrier In Worldwide Service

Volume 1: 1960-2000


Book by AIRfile

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_01_resized

AIRfile

AIRfile produces a very nice range of illustrated guides which should be very useful for anyone seeking detailed information and colour references, whether for a model build or for general aviation research, on specific aircraft types or theatres of operation. This book is the eighth in AIRfile's current series of colourful and beautifully illustrated aircraft and is primarily geared for the aircraft model builder. The combination of well researched written detail, accompanied with full colour profile and plan illustrations, with contributions by experts from a broad sphere in all subjects of aviation, make these guides an essential aspect in any modellers toolkit.

The Book

This is the first of a two volume set about the HS/BAe Harrier and details the history of the first generation version of the Harrier; from the Hawker P.1127 and Kestrel; progressing with the fist production aircraft in the form of the Harrier GR.1 and continues to the last of the type in the Harriers GR.3 and FRS.2. There are additional chapters on the two seat trainer versions plus export aircraft including the U.S. Harrier AV-8 series as well as Spanish, Indian and Thai air force aircraft. Volume two is in the planning stage and will detail the second generation Harriers when published.

The author, Glenn Ashley, has provided a concise history, within the 72 pages of this book, of the first generation Harrier; and details the camouflage and markings carried on Harries of the various air arms which operated this iconic aircraft. Encompassing and complementing the Glenn's writing are the colourful and explicitly detailed illustrations, which are professionally produced by Jon Freeman. A second volume is in preparation which will cover the second generation aircraft of the Harrier family..

The format of the book is of A4 portrait layout with card covers front and back. Within the book there are no less than 166 images; covering 124 Harriers ( I didn't even realise so many first generation aircraft had been built.) of which 99 are profile views and a further 25 are full 4-view illustrations which show the top, underneath, left and right aspects of the aircraft depicted in full colour. These illustrations are interspersed with knowledgeable and well researched data and backed up with over 40 black/white and colour photographs of the respective aircraft.

This book, along with it's future sister companion volume, will be a welcome addition for the Harrier enthusiast and should help modelling enthusiasts in their quest to build or improve their Harrier models.

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_04_resized


This volume starts with a short history of the design and development of the prototype, and includes some nice black and white photographs of the P.1127 and the subsequently named Kestrel as shown in the above image, The narrative itself gives historical information as to where and when these aircraft were built, including their progression requiring onward transfer to Dunsfold for final assembly and flight testing etc.

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_10_resized

The fully coloured illustrations are laid out either as a single profile image of a particular aircraft, formatted as four separate aircraft to a page as above; or as a 4-view profile and plan of a single aircraft as shown in the illustration below.

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_23_resized

Each illustration has a short heading beside it, providing additional detailed information relevant to the aircraft at a specific time in that aircraft's life. Details include type; serial; code; Squadron; location and date. This is followed by a narrative highlighting some interesting data which would be of interest to the modeller and aviation historian alike.

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_34_resized

Photographs are included at various sections of the book and help to confirm camouflage and markings as shown in the illustrations.

The book is divided into sections, covering prototypes; operational Royal Air Force aircraft; Operational Fleet Air Arm aircraft; Trainer/Two seat versions and Export aircraft. An example of a Sea Harrier (SHAR) FRS.1 is shown below. Some particulars to note, as in the page highlighted below, that alongside the aircraft illustrations and narrative there are also additional images, in higher resolution, showing particular markings and aspects of the aircraft being illustrated

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_41_resized

The book moves on to provide details and examples of the two-seat, trainer, version; again the views can be either four to a page profiles or a single page giving a 4-view plan and profile set of illustrations and details.

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_56_resized

Glen and Jon have not just been researching and writing about the fairly commonplace camouflaged versions of these aircraft but also some of the more unusual, and interesting, colour schemes to be found on these aircraft. This 4-view depiction of a Harrier T.2A of No.1 Squadron, RAF Wittering would make quite an eye-catching model if built and displayed a model shows around the country.

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_55_resized

Following on from the UK built and operated aircraft sections, the book then moves on to cover export aircraft. As with the previous sections, there are some fine, unusual and very interesting colours and markings to be seen on these aircraft as can be seen in these U.S. Marine Corps types below. The accompanying photographs could also inspire some ideas for diorama layouts!

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_64_resized

Additional information, as with the aircraft motif's detailed below, has been included in a larger format allowing a more detailed and is presented alongside the specific aircraft that adorns it. Each narrative is accompanied, at the end, with reference data and shows where that particular piece of data has been sourced from.

First_Generation_Harrier_Vol1_67_resized

Conclusion

This latest publication from AIRfile should be a real treasure for Harrier enthusiasts. The vast amount of information and colour markings of so many aircraft should mean that loads of different Harrier models can be built. This is yet another fine compilation from Neil Robinson and the team at AIRfile for the benefit of modellers and Harrier enthusiasts alike.

This is yet another book which should become a handy guide for identifying specific colours and markings of particular aircraft for the modeller. I have already found some great ideas for future builds after reading this well detailed book on the first generation Harrier aircraft and I am already keenly looking forward to seeing volume 2 being produced for the second generation aircraft.


I personally rate this book and highly recommend it for all builders of Harrier model kits.


Review sample courtesy of airfile-publications-logo.jpg


bin.jpg

Kindly mention Britmodeller.com to the supplier when making enquiries or placing orders

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I point out a minor error? The first production Harrier was XV738, not XW738.

XV738 was my jet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting Enzo, however I would recommend you write to the publishers, you can get the details on AIRfiles website at the bottom of the review, and let them know. It is probably a typo and that way they can make then necessary amendments for the next edition/reprint.

Thanks for pointing it out though, as it should help any modeller in the interim. Spooky that the serial was so close to yours, :huh: otherwise the error may not have been picked up!

cheers

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a typo.

Good timing with the new Airfix harrier out.

Might have to get this one.

Julien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just had another look at that page and it can't be a typo as it is also shown as the serial on the actual illustration. Publishers can sometimes get the spelling wrong in the print set but that is definitely also showing on the illustration and that is out of the control of the publisher/typesetter etc.

cheers

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is probably a typo

Looks like a typo.

A typo which is in the graphic, not just in the text.

But you're right. I'll contact the publishers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Enzo,

I will also contact them and try to get some info as well.

I note, at the bottom of the narrative, that the reference was sourced from "private photo archives of Mr John Farley OBE" perhaps the publishers can talk to Jon Freeman, the illustrator, to ascertain where the issue may be.

cheers

Mike

Edit: I've just checked on the serials website and XW738 was allocated to a Northrop Shellduck D.1 which looks to be a UAV.

I don't want this to detract from the focus on the book review so intend to leave it with the publishers to sort out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want this to detract from the focus on the book review

Nor should it. I intend to buy this book myself. By now you know my personal interest in XV738. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As they say, you can't beat "qaulity control" checks, or even "prof reading". But then again, the best way to find mistakes is to publish (I know!).

Nice to have another edition to the Harrier library.

One observation is the mixing of paint references ... UK Harriers are quoted with BS numbers, whereas the AV-8S example shown is quoted as having "the very attractive light grey and white scheme". If you can't be bothered to check the BS/FS standard colour all the time, why make this type of statement. Indeed, I quote from their site ... "A range of illustrated camouflage and markings guides ... designed to provide comprehensive camouflage scheme and markings coverage". Not sure I can find "very attractive light grey" in the Humbrol / Lifecolor / Revell / Vallejo etc catalogues!!!

Mike (bootneck) - can you tell us how many pages are dedicated to the USMC, Spanish and Thai Harriers respectively please? Doesn't look like they get much coverage, which is a shame as they had some interesting schemes and variations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

can you tell us how many pages are dedicated to the USMC, Spanish and Thai Harriers respectively please? Doesn't look like they get much coverage, which is a shame as they had some interesting schemes and variations.

Hi Graham,

I agree that the book is primarily british based subjects, running at approx. 80% with the remaining 20% being export aircraft. However that really is only to be expected as that probably equates to the variation on interest in the various nations aircraft.

Of the 166 images in the book, the breakdown (profiles, 4-view and photos) of export aircraft is as follows:

USMC = 15; Spanish = 4; Indian = 6; Thai = 5. This gives a total of 30 images of export aircraft.

Does this book contain any scale plans or drawings?

Hi Kev,

There are no scale plans or drawings, other than the examples already shown in the review.

cheers

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Kev,

There are no scale plans or drawings, other than the examples already shown in the review.

cheers

Mike

Bummer. I need something to assist with correcting the Revell 1/32 kit. Perhaps the photos will prove adequate.

Kev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some nice errors in there apart from wrong serials...

White intakes interiors on an early RAF GR3?

White intakes interiors on an EDSG/W SHAR FRS1?

Looks like quality control took a good few months off and enjoyed the summer weather.

It's a real shame for the Harrier modellers now that the new Airfix kit is out, that they get a book they believe they can trust which, on the basis of the above few examples, looks to be error prone. I hope they call the last mark of SHAR right - FA.2.

Ah well, looks like I'll be saving my money...

Why is it people always get Harrier stuff wrong but not, say, Spitfire stuff?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A typo which is in the graphic, not just in the text.

But you're right. I'll contact the publishers.

Can I point out a minor error? The first production Harrier was XV738, not XW738.

XV738 was my jet.

Hi, Enzo

I was going to make the same point, but you got there first!

"your jet"... at what point in its life?

Regards

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some nice errors in there apart from wrong serials...

White intakes interiors on an early RAF GR3?

White intakes interiors on an EDSG/W SHAR FRS1?

Looks like quality control took a good few months off and enjoyed the summer weather.

It's a real shame for the Harrier modellers now that the new Airfix kit is out, that they get a book they believe they can trust which, on the basis of the above few examples, looks to be error prone. I hope they call the last mark of SHAR right - FA.2.

Ah well, looks like I'll be saving my money...

Why is it people always get Harrier stuff wrong but not, say, Spitfire stuff?

Hi Nick,

I'm sorry, I missed these.

- What other serials are wrong, pages?

- What pages are the white intake references on?

- The mis-representation of the F/A.2 instead of FA.2 is unusual, especially as the heading is correctly laid out.

These comments do find their way back to the Author, Illustrator, Typist and Publisher so hopefully these will be remedied for any reprint/second edition - as with most books and not just modelling titles.

As with all references, one should not take a single source of data as the definitive proof of accuracy but should be used in conjunction with other reference materials, including photos and first-hand experience etc.

cheers

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"your jet"... at what point in its life?

Towards the end.

In 1987 IV(AC) Sqn celebrated its 75th anniversary. It struck me that 1987 was also XV738's 25th birthday so I suggested to the Sqn CO that the jet should be painted in a special scheme which I designed. That scheme was the squadron flash on the fin. Do a search on BM and you will find numerous mentions by me about that scheme! :D

From that point on, I always considered Bravo to be "my" jet. Whenever I was running a HAS, I always made sure that Bravo was one of my jets. I loved that jet and made sure it was cared for. Considering it was the oldest Harrier in the fleet, it was always one of the best jets. We had a young jockey nicknamed "Bedlam" who had a reputation for bending (and sometimes breaking) jets. I made sure that Bedlam never, ever flew Bravo. Oddly enough, no one ever noticed how the INAS went into aurorev whenever Bedlam climbed into the cockpit of that jet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mike,

Unlike you I haven't got a copy of the book, I'm just looking at what's represented above.

From the pages above (23 and 41) the 4 views of XV787 and XZ492 suggest that the intake interiors are white in their underside views.

The H on the fin tip of XZ492/123 should also be angled aft on both side of the fin.

The roundels on the wings of XV787/02 (Hot to Trot) also don't look to be 36" diameter as the text states, they look smaller in the drawings, the same size as those on the furselage, i.e. 24"! As a comparison the upper wing roundels on Le Pink 'arrier look to be 36" diameter. Upper-wing roundels were 30" diameter on matt wraparound Harriers, e.g XV787/02, the 36" upper diameter roundels were replaced by 30" ones circa 1974 as aircraft rotated through maintenance.

See PM incoming...

Cheers,

Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I point out a minor error? The first production Harrier was XV738, not XW738.

XV738 was my jet.

Hi Enzo

My mistake here I'm afraid...my photo showing XV738 was small and grainy and I presumed the 'W' was in fact a 'V'.

Sorry

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting Enzo, however I would recommend you write to the publishers, you can get the details on AIRfiles website at the bottom of the review, and let them know. It is probably a typo and that way they can make then necessary amendments for the next edition/reprint.

Thanks for pointing it out though, as it should help any modeller in the interim. Spooky that the serial was so close to yours, :huh: otherwise the error may not have been picked up!

cheers

Mike

Hi Mike.

Unless AirfIle sell all the copies of the first production run some errors would have to stay...although... if the books' first run was to be sold out then the second run would have these small errors rectified.

Yours

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As they say, you can't beat "qaulity control" checks, or even "prof reading". But then again, the best way to find mistakes is to publish (I know!).

Nice to have another edition to the Harrier library.

One observation is the mixing of paint references ... UK Harriers are quoted with BS numbers, whereas the AV-8S example shown is quoted as having "the very attractive light grey and white scheme". If you can't be bothered to check the BS/FS standard colour all the time, why make this type of statement. Indeed, I quote from their site ... "A range of illustrated camouflage and markings guides ... designed to provide comprehensive camouflage scheme and markings coverage". Not sure I can find "very attractive light grey" in the Humbrol / Lifecolor / Revell / Vallejo etc catalogues!!!

Mike (bootneck) - can you tell us how many pages are dedicated to the USMC, Spanish and Thai Harriers respectively please? Doesn't look like they get much coverage, which is a shame as they had some interesting schemes and variations.

Hi.

I did originally put in exact FS & BS colour quotes and numbers in ALL the text captions but presumably due to space limitations these have been omitted post my passing the artwork on...if anyone does want my original text captions I can PM them on.

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some nice errors in there apart from wrong serials...

White intakes interiors on an early RAF GR3?

White intakes interiors on an EDSG/W SHAR FRS1?

Looks like quality control took a good few months off and enjoyed the summer weather.

It's a real shame for the Harrier modellers now that the new Airfix kit is out, that they get a book they believe they can trust which, on the basis of the above few examples, looks to be error prone. I hope they call the last mark of SHAR right - FA.2.

Ah well, looks like I'll be saving my money...

Why is it people always get Harrier stuff wrong but not, say, Spitfire stuff?

Hi Nick.

Re: White intake interiors...my error here but TBH it's not really a major issue is it really...not like I've used Lilac instead of Dark Green!!?

Surely photo reference is the first port of call for modellers before embarking on a particular project whereas these books are a colour and markings addition to said references?

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mike,

Unlike you I haven't got a copy of the book, I'm just looking at what's represented above.

From the pages above (23 and 41) the 4 views of XV787 and XZ492 suggest that the intake interiors are white in their underside views.

The H on the fin tip of XZ492/123 should also be angled aft on both side of the fin.

The roundels on the wings of XV787/02 (Hot to Trot) also don't look to be 36" diameter as the text states, they look smaller in the drawings, the same size as those on the furselage, i.e. 24"! As a comparison the upper wing roundels on Le Pink 'arrier look to be 36" diameter. Upper-wing roundels were 30" diameter on matt wraparound Harriers, e.g XV787/02, the 36" upper diameter roundels were replaced by 30" ones circa 1974 as aircraft rotated through maintenance.

See PM incoming...

Cheers,

Nick

Oh Nick for goodness sake.....

633761899407989620-facepalm.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nick.

Re: White intake interiors...my error here but TBH it's not really a major issue is it really...not like I've used Lilac instead of Dark Green!!?

Surely photo reference is the first port of call for modellers before embarking on a particular project whereas these books are a colour and markings addition to said references?

Jon

Hi Jon, I come in peace..........however , I have to agree with Nick here. I mean the whole point of a reference book is so you can refer to it. You have to have some confidence in it being accurate, otherwise whats the point?

I know it sounds like nit-picking, but this aircraft is held in a very high regard to a lot of modellers on here, you just have to look at some of the threads....a review here was never likely to pass without scrutiny!

And ..not wishing to add to the book-bashing ...............but my 'Spot the error' contribution....XV787 'Hot to Trot' - this was surely a GR3 by then? (No Alternator cooling fairing atop of the fuselage).

Despite the glitches, I'll probably still treat myself to the book!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...