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Spitfire Griffin nose drawings?


GMK

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I'm looking to source drawings (with cross-sections) of Spitfire with a two-stage Griffon fitted (i.e. XIV, XVIII, XIX, 21, 22 or 24). Are there any recommendations or warnings?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Greg

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HI

you might find this thread of interest.

http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=234930591

and this, on the most accurate Spitfire plans

http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=234921406

I can't get the ones John posted to load, so can't comment.

HTH

T

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Thanks Troy,

Interesting threads. I happen to have a lot of stuff on Merlin-engined Spits (Spirfire: engineered etc), but nothing at all on the Griffon variants.

Any tips there?

Greg

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Thanks Troy,

Interesting threads. I happen to have a lot of stuff on Merlin-engined Spits (Spirfire: engineered etc), but nothing at all on the Griffon variants.

Any tips there?

Greg

Hi Greg

I hate this laptop, I just lost what I wrote. grrr

Right, sorry, not clear, Peter Cooke's plans are for the XIV and XIX, with details of the XII and XVIII added. They are very highly rated, by both Edgar and John Aero.

There are some minor errors, but not quite sure what, I really hope Edgar or John can perhaps clarify what exactly the faults are, which are mentioned in the following links, relevant bits quoted.

In this thread on the Airfix MkXII

http://www.britmodel...opic=63454&st=0

post #37 by Edgar

Posted 19 February 2011 - 10:13 PM

Today, I measured the Seafire 17, at Yeovilton; I had to use a folding measure, rather than a tape, so can't swear that each measure is within a fraction, but I used the old maxim "measure twice, cut once," so they are as follows (actual measure first in inches, then to 1/48 in mm, then the Airfix fuselage):-

Engine compartment 74.5" 39.4mm 39.1; fuel tank 34" 18 18.6; cockpit 57" 30.2 29.9; transport joint (middle) 114.5" 70.6 70.3. I couldn't get aft of the transport joint, because there were boxes, tables, and bodies in the way. However, totalling that lot, I make the real thing, in 1/48 148.2mm, and the Airfix fuselage 147.9, a difference of .3mm, or a fraction over half an inch; I can live with that, but it means that two printed plans have been printed short, while Peter's drawings have some of the panel lines in the wrong place.

Edgar

As for the P.Cooke panel lines error, from what I can see they are in the rear of the cowl/fuel tank area [from memory].

see also

http://www.britmodel...showtopic=19736

whch now I look I see has been bumped up recently!

Not stupid, just (unfairly) young, I suspect. Back in the 70s, he was IPMS (UK) National Champion, with an Airfix 1/24 Spitfire converted to a XIV; the following year, he won again, with a scratchbuilt 1/24 Tempest; the following year, he should have won again, with a 1/24 Sea Fury, but, after a hurried meeting, the then committee declared that they'd instituted a new rule (that you couldn't be champion more than once,) so they awarded the title to a dreadfully embarrassed Tony Woolett (who hadn't even won his class, coming second to Peter.) Peter then went professional, selling resin Spitfires, Hurricanes, Mosquitoes, Mustangs, and Lancasters, all in 1/24th scale. He has retired, but, if you can find a book entitled "Scratch Built, A Celebration of the Static Scale Airplane Modeller's Craft," it's a co-written effort, together with John Alcorn and George Lee, and it gives a perfect idea of their craft.

I have some of Peter's photos on my computer, not just complete airframes, but parts, too. His drawings were published by Nexus, in Scale Models, consisting of the XII, XIV, and XIX, and should still be available from their successors, whoever they are, now (I can't keep up with it!) My sole remaining copy is decidedly tatty, since I passed my best set on to a manufacturer, who wants to produce a XIV, in 1/24th scale.

Peter admits that he got the fuselages slightly wrong, in side profile, but has supplied me with a corrected drawing of the XIX fuselage. It was Peter, incidentally, who first caused mayhem, in the modelling world, when he spotted the "hump," in the IX cowling.

Edgar

If you email me [see profile] or PM me [inbox nearly full tho] I can link you to scans scaled up to 1/48th of the Cooke drawings.

IIRC, also published in Scale Models in the late 70's were a set of Mk22/24 drawings, but I've not had a proper search through my old mags to see if I can find them.

perhaps someone knows what issue they were in and who by? [a quick google has not turned this info]

HTH

T

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Here are the Spitfire 22/24 drawings from Scale Models.

Hi John

do you know the date of the issue they were published in, will make it easier for me to find my back issue!

thanks

T

Edited by Troy Smith
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Greg

Here is a link to the Spitfire XIX drawing.

http://s197.photobuc...zps2dfe5e06.jpg

It is a bit too big to post on here.

John

Downloaded the Spit XIX drawing and, well…

The underwing radiators are incorrectly portrayed. They show spurious continuous curved lines in both plan and profile. The middle section, housing the actual radiator unit, should be slab shaped with straight sides and bottom and the curved contour in plan view should be the shape of the fairing between the wing and the radiator housing.

Because of this problem, I'd take those drawings with a grain of salt. As pointed out above, Peter Cook's drawings are the ones to get.

Kind regards,

Joachim

Edited by Spitfire31
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Hmmm. That makes it a bit tricky. The drawings that John posted have quite a few cross sections provided from the spinner backplate to the firewall (my area of interest), whereas the Cooke drawings have three.

To verify the accuracy of both drawings, maybe comparing the diameter of the spinner backplate on Griffon Spitfires? Is this a known dimension?

Couldn't find anything with google.

Thanks again guys.

Greg

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I found this in my Documents folder, not sure where it came from and it is fairly low resolution but might be of help.

Griffoncowling.jpg

This drawing is more useful than you might think, I used this to CAD up the frames in Autocad and basically the chart in the corner gives you all the plot points to draw each curve of each frame. Once I wrapped a skin over in Rhino you really get the right impression of the Spit nose.
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As a one-time design draughtsman, I am well aware of the drawings potential usefulness but the low resolution makes it almost impossible to read the offset figures in the table, to my eyes, at least. But, then, I started my D.O. career in the days of tracing cloth, French curves and Riefler instruments!

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I used this to CAD up the frames in Autocad and basically the chart in the corner gives you all the plot points to draw each curve of each frame. Once I wrapped a skin over in Rhino you really get the right impression of the Spit nose.

Hello Graham,

Any chance of sharing your CAD work?

Regards,

Greg

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Hello Graham,

Any chance of sharing your CAD work?

Regards,

Greg

Hi Greg,

Yes I will post something at the weekend, I'm in London at work for a few days but will be back home at the weekend, I've got the MK 16 low back fuselage in 3D built from the Supermarine Charts and drawings.

Graham.

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Thanks Graham,

As an aside, it would be interesting to compare the CAD cross sections to the Spring & Cooke drawings.

I'm planning to start my 1/24 Griffon nose this weekend: perhaps I should wait.

Regards,

Greg

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