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Curtiss Hawk (P-36 or H-75) in 1:72 scale


dr_gn

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Guys,

What is the best model of the Curtiss Hawk (P-36 or H-75) in 1:72 scale?

Ideally with the availability of a cockpit detail set etc.

I'm wanting to model the TFC aircraft based at Duxford.

Cheers,

Dr_GN.

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Hi,

I don't know about best, but there is at least old Heller, Revell and newer Azur. I have also rough feeling that there was also Monogram P-36. I think that Azur model is way to go, because it's newer than others. If my memory is correct Heller shape is good, but model itself is quite basic. I think others will comment more.

Br. Vesa

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Hi,

I don't know about best, but there is at least old Heller, Revell and newer Azur. I have also rough feeling that there was also Monogram P-36. I think that Azur model is way to go, because it's newer than others. If my memory is correct Heller shape is good, but model itself is quite basic. I think others will comment more.

Br. Vesa

Thanks,

Yes, the Azur model was the one I had in mind, but I have no experience of that manufacturer.

Cheers.

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Well if someone offers you an Aoshima one for free, it's too expensive....

http://www.britmodel...c=234924630&hl=

I would guess the Azur one is the best of all but out of the poor bunch that I have seen the Monogram and Revell ones are better than the Aoshima one.

There's an opening here for an enterprising company in 1/72. Mr Airfix....... ? Mr Hobby Boss... (please use the A-team).... ?

There are good P-40 interior sets which can be adapted.

Edited by Ed Russell
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The monogram kit is very good, as compared to the Heller, Revell and Aoshma. I have all four and the Monogram holds up very well, even though it has raised panel lines and no interior...patience will find one on eBay for $10-15.

You can find a cockpit and wheel wells made by Starfighter Decals that are specific to the Monogram kit.

http://www.starfighter-decals.com/p36-resin-upgrade-for-revellmonogr36.html

Plus they have lots of decals for it.

Tim

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Looks like the Azur model is the one then, possibly with the Revell version for the nostalgic box art.

How about detail kits for the Azur kit - any available?

And Decal sets - Ideally for the Frenc Air force H-75 version?

Thanks again.

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Monogram looks very accurate shapewise, although I am not sure of any reliable scale plans that could confirm that. There was also AML kit which appeared almost simultaneously with Azur and it looked more detailed and better engineered.

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When I was young... i.e. some 25-40 years ago there were only four: Aoshima (rubbish), Heller (with 9-cylinder single-row Cyclone and a cowling proper for 14-cylinder twin-row Twin Wasp), not-too-bad Revell and the very good Monogram. Then two Czech short-runs appeared. Azur is still available, but it has several geometrical issues - the most difficult to correct is wrong (seriously too narrow) undercariage track. AML is a beauty, but it isn't easily available, especially in Cyclone-engined variants (both with fixed- and retractable u/c). Another bonus of AML is almost identical (except for obvious differences) P-40 Tomahawk kit. Only using these twins one can get two early Curtiss monoplane Hawks in 72nd scale that look alike - not like Spitfire and Bf109 which is the case when you put side by side Airfix/Pavla/Trumpeter/Academy P-40 and Revell/Monogram/Heller/Azur P-36.

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Special Hobby did one. Not sure if its the same tool as the Azur one but quite likely. As others have mnetioned, if you can locate the Monogram one and some A/market cockpit details you're on your way!

Edited by Paul J
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Beg to disagree in part with some of the posters. The Monogram kit is nicely tooled, but its accuracy is suspect despite what the Detail & Scale author says while dismissing its then competitors (Revell, Heller, Aoshima -- well, the latter is indeed much inferior to any of them) in a single phrase. The Revell kit is cruder in finesse -- rivetsville all around -- but its wingtips are more correctly shaped, and has its wing armament and pitot tube in the right place, as compared to the much-touted Monogram offering. Moreover, I don't think the combination of two pairs of wing guns and one pair of spent cartridge buckets that Monogram proposes ever existed. The Heller/Buzco kit is also festooned with rivets, has a narrower fuselage than the others, and also the rear cockpit windows (the triangular ones) are misshapen, but has a much better interior (as it used to be with other Heller aircraft kits of this vintage) than the rest. They all have their strong points: Monogram's has the best surface treatment, Revell's is more accurate shapewise, and Heller's has a more detailed interior: with some care, any of them could be built into a satisfying representation of the H-75/P-36 (Aoshima's is hopeless.).

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I thought the Heller cowling was crude and excessively bulky, whereas the Monogram kit appeared to be anorexic, certainly in comparison. Despite the rivets, I thought the Revell one the best of the bunch. I was never tempted by the Aosima - although if anyone has an Aosima Hurricane going cheap I might be tempted just for completeness!

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I'm not the type of modeller to get upset if the dihedral angle is 0.05 degrees out.

I'm more concerned about difficult to correct issues that ultimately make or break the look of a model, namely:

Reasonably engineered recessed panel lines and surface detail (the recent Airfix Spitfire MK1 went straight in the bin - it's just unforgivably bad in this respect).

The fit and finish of the glazing.

Fidelity of small components such as u/c legs.

Anything else I can deal with (filler, cockpit detail, engine detail, correcting gun positions or whatever) and make a reasonable looking model.

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You can forget all the earlier kits if "reasonably recessed panel lines" is your "make-and-break" issue, for none of them have any such. As for fit of glazing, I had some problems with the Monogram but that could just be me.

The Azur version looks pretty good in this respect - at least from the limited review builds I've seen?

Is there a particular issue with surface finish on this kit?

What I meant was, if a kit has minor outline issues, I probably wouldn't notice - if something is grossly wrong then of course it's a different matter.

Edited by dr_gn
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The AML kits were the best, shapewise and regarding the proportions, they had the numbers 72009 and 72013, both versions of single and double row engines were in both kits.

http://www.scalemate...t.php?id=158497

http://www.scalemate...t.php?id=131753

They are sold out since years, i hope AML makes a rerun.

The Azur has an engine that didn't exist for any of the the Hawk 75 versions, a 7 cylinder single row engine

Edited by occa
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The AML kits were the best, shapewise and regarding the proportions, they had the numbers 72009 and 72013, both versions of single and double row engines were in both kits.

http://www.scalemate...t.php?id=158497

http://www.scalemate...t.php?id=131753

They are sold out since years, i hope AML makes a rerun.

The Azur has an engine that didn't exist for any of the the Hawk 75 versions, a 7 cylinder single row engine

Thanks,

Presumably I could get a resin engine to fit the cowling?

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Thanks,

Presumably I could get a resin engine to fit the cowling?

Yes I am certain it can be done, the Mohawk needs a Curtiss-Wright R-1820 single row 9 cylinder engine ...

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Yes I am certain it can be done, the Mohawk needs a Curtiss-Wright R-1820 single row 9 cylinder engine ...

Thanks, I'm wanting to model TFC's airworthy Curtiss Hawk H-75A-1, which is fitted with a 14 cylinder Pratt & Whitney R-1830-925

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Thanks, I'm wanting to model TFC's airworthy Curtiss Hawk H-75A-1, which is fitted with a 14 cylinder Pratt & Whitney R-1830-925

The cowling is different then from the Azur kit then, it's longer but with a reduced diameter ... not easy to scratch build IMO.

The Monogram kit has the fitting front cowl I strongly suppose, tho the nose armament could be different

This one:

http://modelingmadness.com/review/preww2/craybillp36.htm

Or this:

http://www.scalemate...t.php?id=147808

Cheers,

Martin

Edited by occa
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Wright R-1820 Cyclone is necessary only for the H.75A-4 French variant, the Norwegian A-8 (US P-36G), the Dutch A-7 and the British Mohawk Mk.IV. In any case such engine needs totally different cowling than the P-36A/C, the French H.75A-1/2/3 and the Norwegian H.75A-6. If I remember Special Hobby/Azur kits the one labelled H.75A-4/Mohawk has a 9-cylinder R-1820 and proper cowling. The problem appears only with the R-1830 Twin Wasp-engined kit, which simply has half of the engine (front 7-cylinder row of the 14-cylinder twin-row radial) needed. But here also the cowling is OK for the 14-cylinder variant - totally unsuitable for the Mohawk Mk.IV. You simply won't be able to modify it to the correct shape.

There are dozens of books (even the one I wrote in person 25 years ago) and hundreds of photos concerning the H.75/P-36 family. You can't do it wrong - just have a closer look.

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The Azur has an engine that didn't exist for any of the the Hawk 75 versions, a 7 cylinder single row engine

You have to look at your Czech kit once again as I did - in Special Hobby (H.75A-2/3) boxing there are TWO rows of injection-moulded 7-cylinder each, so the engine is OK. On the other hand the Special Hobby fixed-gear variant and Azur-labelled Mohawk don't have this sprue, having a resin-moulded 9-cylinder R-1820 Cyclone instead.

http://www.mojehobby.pl/products/H-75A-3-Hawk-European-war.html

http://www.internetmodeler.com/2003/october/first-looks/spechobby_hawk.htm

So, Dr_gn, the only problem is narrow undercarriage track, but if 27 mm (between the legs) instead of 30 doesn't bother you at all you can buy the MPM (Special Hobby 72053) H.75 kit.

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You have to look at your Czech kit once again as I did - in Special Hobby (H.75A-2/3) boxing there are TWO rows of injection-moulded 7-cylinder each, so the engine is OK. On the other hand the Special Hobby fixed-gear variant and Azur-labelled Mohawk don't have this sprue, having a resin-moulded 9-cylinder R-1820 Cyclone instead.

http://www.mojehobby...ropean-war.html

http://www.internetm...chobby_hawk.htm

So, Dr_gn, the only problem is narrow undercarriage track, but if 27 mm (between the legs) instead of 30 doesn't bother you at all you can buy the MPM (Special Hobby 72053) H.75 kit.

Errr, oh dear.

Bad news is I ordered the wrong one from Hannants (Azur), and they don't appear to have the right one.

Good news is I was picking it up from theTelford show (with some other stuff) , so hopefully they'll understand if I don't actually buy it...

Thank you very much for clarifying all that. Presuably then the H-75 A-1 (that I want to build) is effectively the same as the A-3 (and I won't need an aftermarket engine)?

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