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some question about sea harrier exhaust nozzle


sxm_m
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hi, guys

I'm building the airfix 48 sea harrier FA2.

I try to replace the original rear exhaust nozzle parts, beacuse the shape was wrong.

I have three choice, Aires, Palva and Heritage.

Palva's shape also wrong. So I will not choose it.

Heritage hase right shape, but it look not so good. :-(

Aires's product has good detail and looks the shape is right, but it is for hasegawa AV-8B / Harrier II.

I just wondering, is the Harrier II's rear nozzle same with sea fa.2?

Thanks in advance!

harriernozzle_zpsf1229d11.jpg

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I think they only changed the front nozzles between Harrier I and Harrier II.

Here's a couple of shots that may help with detailing the rears ...

Harrier I (on FA2) ...

XZ499-029.JPG

and on the T.52 ...

GVTOL-W082.JPG

Harrier II (on GR9)

ZD433-W131.JPG

ZD433-W133.JPG

Hope that helps?

thanks so much chocksAway! It's really helpful.

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Note that the nozzles on the big wing Harrier has one fewer guide vanes. If you look closely, you can see the third vane in the SHar/GR3 nozzle inside the outboard curve.

This is a another angle on the GR5/7/9 nozzle ...

ZD469-W071.JPG

so it also has the third vane to which you refer? it can also just be seen in the AV-8B nozzle in the post by Julien, if I've grasped correctly what you mean?

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Kirk

So what's a trimmer and what is a vane?

And for the benefit of this thread - is there any "modellers" difference in the rear nozzles between 1st and 2nd generation Harriers? (I believe there's some real-life engineering differences in materials and fixtures).

Confused - as ever over Harriers.

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So what we need now is RB (newish member) who seems to have forgotten more Pegasus stuff than I'll ever know. But I'll stick my neck out until he (or some other grown up) comes along:

The job of the vanes is to turn the efflux through 90 degrees whilst minimising thrust losses through turbulence/heat/noise etc.

The trimmers help match the output fore and aft & left and right to keep the centre of thrust(?) within design limits. Too much thrust from the rear and the pilot will have to be balancing with pitch trim from the forward RCV all the time. No two engines give idential output so trimmers are added/taken away as a result of static & flight testing.

Plausible?

The only point of this to the modeller is that you can add pretty much whichever trimmers suit your mood - unless your model Pegasus actually functions as a turbofan.

Kirk

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Don't think I can highlight without downloading and reposting the pics so I'll try the 1000 words route.

See this hot nozzle below? From left to right it's vane, vane, trimmer. In the cold, you can only see vanes.

ZD469-W071.JPG

And here? The trimmer is at the top of the shot between the vanes.

ZD433-W131.JPG

Finally, here you can see the welded union between the vane and the nozzle and the fixing positions where the trimmers can be fitted.

ZD433-W133.JPG

Thanks/acknowledgements to those whose posted pictures I borrowed.

Whilst I'm being a smarty-pants, see those dimples in the surface of the vanes? The vane is constructed a bit like the really cheap doors you see in the DIY places; the outer skin is reinforced by a zig-zag within it which is welded(?) where it meets the skin. IIRC the material is titanium rather than hardboard, cardboard & glue but the principle is the same.

As I said before, maybe a paid up sooty will come along in a mo and separate fact from assertion.

Cheers,

Kirk

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