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Spitfire Green 1940-41


Sean_M

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There was a post done not long ago about these boxed sets of paints.

http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=234932806

 

Not an extensive response, but those that piped in were happy them. 

Desert colours weren't addressed, but their Azure blue appeared briefly int this thread, page 7 about mid way down:

 

Blue, Blue, My Love Is Azure Blue

 

regards,

Jack

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  • 1 month later...

I thought of starting a new post, however much of the info has been discussed above, I as you may know I am building a Hurricance Mk 1 LE-D c1940. I intend to use the same brown mix as see on my spit above. AM I ON SAFE GROUND? or was a different brown used on Hurricanes?

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You can use the same brown and the same green. These colours did not change during the war, so you can use them on every RAF aircraft of the time if it was painted in dark green and dark earth. Actually the same colours were used after the war for a very long time !

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I thought of starting a new post, however much of the info has been discussed above, I as you may know I am building a Hurricance Mk 1 LE-D c1940. I intend to use the same brown mix as see on my spit above. AM I ON SAFE GROUND? or was a different brown used on Hurricanes?

The colour is Dark Earth and it is standard RAF colour. So, yes, same as a Spitfier from the same era.

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  • 1 year later...

Just a note of interest. I painted the same Tamiya Mix over a primer coat of Black and it seems to have lightened. exactly the same tin I used in my Spitfire Va (that had a chemical mishap). Its the first time I have used Black Primer. Does it affect the topcoat?

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Sean,

Since it did affect the top coat, for you, then the answer is 'yes'.

Factors that contribute to what the top coat of paint actually looks like to you is the thickness of the primer underneat (how even the color of the primer is) and of course it's shade. White, gray or black primers can be used for particular effects, especially when trying to get a NMF scheme. I've not tried it, but I have seen my color coats look 'wrong' when my primer is of different shades. It's how pre-shading works--paint a thin line of black along panel lines you want highlighted then put your color coats on, and you'll see a faint outline of the panel. If using black primer, then the color needs to go on thicker to adequately cover the areas you don't want to show the black through.

I've also read that a red primer makes a yellow look much richer, and vice versa.

Then of course there's the post-shading, weathering and all the other things folks do to make the top color coats look 'different'.

Experiment...

Tim

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Just a note of interest. I painted the same Tamiya Mix over a primer coat of Black and it seems to have lightened. exactly the same tin I used in my Spitfire Va (that had a chemical mishap). Its the first time I have used Black Primer. Does it affect the topcoat?

Just wondering -- why did you happen to choose black for your primer color? I should think some sort of medium gray would make more sense, if you really need to use a primer at all. As for the Dark Earth coming out light, it could also be a function of reflectance due to the smoothness or lack thereof of your paint job. I'll bet that once you've gloss coated for decals and applied final flat coat, it'll look pretty much like Dark Earth.

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I know a lot of people use black primer on wargame miniatures. In effect, it gives an overall "preshade" effect, and lighter shades are used to highlight raised areas/centres of colour blocks. I've seen people use a similar technique on vehicles and it looks quite effective. What impact it has on the "trueness" of the top colour is a different question (and of course entirely irrelevant in the context of fantasy/premodern figures), and not one I think I want to approach.

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I must add a footnote to say that I removed all the paint. Resprayed with Mr Finisher Gray and redid the brown (same bottle) and the yellow hue is gone. I am amazed that the brow went from Earth to a more Midstone. I live and learn

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