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How big is Type 45 to Type 22 batch 1


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When and where was this taken? I'm curious at the name of the ship outboard of our T45, and why is she flying the Union Jack at half mast? It looks like an American port due to the flying of the American flag as a matter of courtesy.

Mod. Edited for carp speeling and gramar.

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Just to complete the comparison - the B1 Type 22 is slightly bulkier than a Type 42 - so you can see how much bigger the Type 45 is than its predecessor!

PA280146.jpg

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Looks as if the designers and MOD finally got the message through to their political masters that internal volume is cheap and that, if you're going to be stuck with a ship for 50 years, you may as well make it big enough for a. the job in hand and b. future requirements both foreseen and unforeseen. The early batch Type 42s in particular always suffered from the initial direction to design the smallest possible platform able to take Sea Dart to sea.

Or is all this internal volume just luxury accommodation for matelots?

Edited by Seahawk
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May be its due to the need to put a Merlin or two on the back?

Can we call it a Union flag and not a Union 'jack' as the jack is the jack staff you fly it from?

HMS Dauntless use to be the WRENs basic training base, how things change.

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Can we call it a Union flag and not a Union 'jack' as the jack is the jack staff you fly it from?

Even vexillologists argue about that!

http://www.flaginstitute.org/index.php?location=7.2

It is often stated that the Union Flag should only be described as the Union Jack when flown in the bows of a warship, but this is a relatively recent idea. From early in its life the Admiralty itself frequently referred to the flag as the Union Jack, whatever its use, and in 1902 an Admiralty Circular announced that Their Lordships had decided that either name could be used officially. Such use was given Parliamentary approval in 1908 when it was stated that "the Union Jack should be regarded as the National flag".
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Or is all this internal volume just luxury accommodation for matelots?

It helps as weirdly RN ships now have to conform to service single living accommodation standards, so it's certainly better than the 42 man mess of old, I think at most it's four to a cabin now.

However I believe it's mostly because someone managed to convince the Treasury that big ships are cheaper for long enough to get them built, I'd imagine the need to place the Sampson radar at the top of the mainmast helped as it'd be hard to do it on anything much smaller. As an example, as much chilled water goes up there for the radar as is used on all of a T42's systems.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Looks as if the designers and MOD finally got the message through to their political masters that internal volume is cheap and that, if you're going to be stuck with a ship for 50 years, you may as well make it big enough for a. the job in hand and b. future requirements both foreseen and unforeseen. The early batch Type 42s in particular always suffered from the initial direction to design the smallest possible platform able to take Sea Dart to sea.

Or is all this internal volume just luxury accommodation for matelots?

My understanding was that the Type 1045 Radar was required to be at a certain height, and due to the resultant size of the foremast, the rest of the ship had to be correspondingly larger, so the ship could remain upright. Might have been embarrasing if the ship had turned turtle at sea.

How big is this class compared to the WW2 Cruisers I wonder

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I still can't decide if these things were inspired by Toblerone or by Spanish pilgrims, but that pointy bit always looks desperately top heavy, even if it is mostly empty space.

How big is this class compared to the WW2 Cruisers I wonder

Type 45: length 500'; beam 69'7"; standard displacement 8000 tons

Type 42: length 463'; beam 49'; standard displacement 3600 tons

HMS Belfast: length 613'6"; beam 63'4"; displacement 11550 tons

Edited by pigsty
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Looking at the pictures, in particular #13 - the light grey does not seem to be a very good camouflage color...? Of course this applies to the majority of modern warships, but this question just came to my mind when looking at the pics. In my opinion a darker or even multi-coloured camouflage would do a better job....? :shrug:

Ingo

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Looking at the pictures, in particular #13 - the light grey does not seem to be a very good camouflage color...? Of course this applies to the majority of modern warships, but this question just came to my mind when looking at the pics. In my opinion a darker or even multi-coloured camouflage would do a better job....? :shrug:

Ingo

It depends what range you're viewing it from, lighting conditions etc. the horizon tends to a light-ish grey where a darker ship would stand out. Ultimately no colour is going to be right for all situations so it's a compromise, at the ranges the photos have been taken it wouldn't really matter what colour it was, you'd still see it.

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hi guys, when i was based at RAF Gibraltar (Aug 11 till Aug 12...defense cuts otherwise id still be there ) one of my secondary jobs was Air Cadet Liason. Now there wasnt much RAF'y stuff so i got onto the navy and got them visits on HMS Westminster, and HMS Daring, (and myself a run on HMS sutherland during a gun ex in the med). I must say having visited the 23,s i found that the guys do an brilliant job keeping them running, but they are cramped and are showing there age.

Daring was just awesome roomy and smelt like a new car in places, the bridge was ace just full of computer screens. Im not navy but i was in awe at the thing

anyhow hms daring bridge from just past the half way point, the red seat is the centre line. (ive wiped some detail even though you can get pics like this on the net)

daring.jpg

and HMS Westminster from close to the other side of the bridge (i Have got rid of the cadtes faces as all but 3 are under 18, the rest are staff) Mods if your not happy delete these pics

westy.jpg

Edited by sulky
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Although the Type 45 is bigger and probably better than the type 42, I still prefer the lines of the 42 there is a certain character about them, the type 45 looks....boring IMHO

Yes, they were fine-looking ships but I remember comparing the ships of the NATO Standing Squadron alongside in Antwerp and feeling that the Type 42 distinguished herself for the almost total lack of obvious armament, offensive or defensive.

By the way, the Portuguese frigate seemed to be literally swarming with men, on the German ship a line of matelots immaculately dressed in white had formed a human chain to embark trays of German lager from a refrigerated lorry, the RN vessel seemed completely deserted. National stereotypes or what?

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