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Doug Fritz

Spitfire Landing Gear Oleos

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Hi, I am new to this site and have a question about Spitfires. I am building a model of a Mk VIII serialed JK472 and am wondering whether it had the torque links fitted to the main gear legs.

Thanks,

Doug

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Hi, I am new to this site and have a question about Spitfires. I am building a model of a Mk VIII serialed JK472 and am wondering whether it had the torque links fitted to the main gear legs.

Thanks,

Doug

If you are talking about the parts that connect the gear strut to the axle and looks like a V, then yes, all aircraft have torque links. The axle fits to the oleo which rides up and down inside the strut like a piston. The torque links help to keep everything together. Imagine what would happen if the torque links on one of the four C-5 Galaxy main gears were to fail on take off. Six wheels and tires the size of a "smart" car (and probably weighing a lot more) would come crashing on down.

Later,

Dave

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If you are talking about the parts that connect the gear strut to the axle and looks like a V, then yes, all aircraft have torque links. The axle fits to the oleo which rides up and down inside the strut like a piston. The torque links help to keep everything together. Imagine what would happen if the torque links on one of the four C-5 Galaxy main gears were to fail on take off. Six wheels and tires the size of a "smart" car (and probably weighing a lot more) would come crashing on down.

Later,

Dave

[/quot

NO!...they would not....but if you did take the TORQUE links off- then the wheels would wander toe in to to out around the oleo body. You could simulate the same by driving a post into the side of the outer leg and having a groove in the inside slider - but it would be very hard to seal off. It is the damper rod that limits the top out length. MOST a/c have toque links, either to the side , back or front of the oleo...and if on the nose wheel ...then they are disconnected for towing.

NOW...I want to know if on the SEAFIRE 47 they had for sure a system of compressing the oleo before retraction...and a picture of that particular mechanism.

HTH Steve

Edited by TU-DOGGS

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Thanks to both of you, but photos of early Spitfires (Mk I-V at least) show the oleo struts with no torque links. From what I can tell, the torque links were added during production of the Mk IX and Mk VIII, but I haven't been able to find out when. I am just questioning whether they were on the aircraft that I am building, JF(not JK)472, which was an early production Mk VIII.

Doug

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Hi Doug,

As I understand it JK472 was a Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire Mk. Vc Tropical fitted with a Merlin 46 engine (not a Mk. VIII Spitfire) built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory during 1943. It is very difficult to determine if JK472's oleo struts featured torque/torsion links or splined rams without pictures or documentary evidence. The best I can offer is, it probably was fitted with Link Type Oleo Struts either Type 91901 or 91244/L at some point or it may not have been fitted with them at all and only used the Type 91244 Oleo Struts

Dave's statement that all aircraft have torque/torsion links is not supported by the facts, many aircraft have not had this feature on their oleo struts for example the following information listed below sourced from a British Air Ministry document dated on the 7th of April 1943, Reference S. 84993/II/S.M.8. regarding Spitfire and Seafire oleo struts will make this clear.

It is also worth noting C-5 Galaxy aircraft aside, that the application of torque/torsion links on oleo struts were not applied as a measure to prevent wheels crashing down upon property or unsuspecting livestock. It was/is in fact applied as a measure to maintain wheel alignment that said, Spitfire aircraft used splined rams to maintain wheel alignment prior to the introduction of torque/torsion links on their undercarriage oleo struts.

From S. 84993/II/S.M.8.

Oleo Strut (Splined Ram) Type 90273: Spitfire I, II, VI

Oleo Strut (Splined Ram) Type 91244: Spitfire VA, VB, VC, XIII

Oleo Strut (Link Type) Type 91244/L: Spitfire VC, IX, XI, XII, XIII / Seafire II, III*

Oleo Strut (Splined Ram) Type 91545: Spitfire VII, VIII

Oleo Strut (Link Type) Type 91901: Spitfire VA, VB, VC, VII, VIII, IX, XI, XII, XIII

Oleo Strut (Link Type) Type 91986: Spitfire VC, VII, VIII, IX, XI, XII / Seafire II, III

Oleo Strut (Splined Ram) Type 91776: Spitfire XXI

* Type 91244/L is type 91244 converted to torsion link type for fitment in embodiment of Spitfire Mod. 838 (VII & VIII), Mod. 832 (VC, IX, XII, XIII) and Seafire Mod. 110.

Another British Air Ministry document dated on the 28th of June 1943, Reference A.163676/41/S.M.8. identifies Spitfire Main Undercarriage Oleo Struts as follows;

Spitfire FI Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire FIIA Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire FIIB Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire FVA Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire FVB Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire FVB TROP. Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire FVC Oleo Strut Types 91244, 91901

Spitfire FVC TROP. Oleo Strut Types 91244, 91901

Spitfire FVI Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire FVII Oleo Strut Types 91545, 91901

Spitfire FVIII Oleo Strut Types 91545, 91901

Spitfire FVIII TROP. Oleo Strut Types 91545, 91901

Spitfire FIX Oleo Strut Types 91244, 91901

Spitfire FXII Oleo Strut Types 91244, 91901

Spitfire PRIV Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire PRVII Oleo Strut Type 90273

Spitfire PRXI Oleo Strut Types 91244, 91901

Spitfire PRXIII Oleo Strut Type 90273

Cheers,

Daniel.

Edited by Daniel Cox

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Thanks to both of you, but photos of early Spitfires (Mk I-V at least) show the oleo struts with no torque links. From what I can tell, the torque links were added during production of the Mk IX and Mk VIII, but I haven't been able to find out when. I am just questioning whether they were on the aircraft that I am building, JF(not JK)472, which was an early production Mk VIII.

Doug

Hi again Doug,

I just noticed you are looking for info on JF472 as opposed to JK472, that being the case I would suggest that it is likely that JF 472 as manufactured had Type 91901 Oleo Struts fitted which were torque/torsion link types.

Cheers,

Daniel.

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Thanks to both of you, but photos of early Spitfires (Mk I-V at least) show the oleo struts with no torque links. From what I can tell, the torque links were added during production of the Mk IX and Mk VIII, but I haven't been able to find out when. I am just questioning whether they were on the aircraft that I am building, JF(not JK)472, which was an early production Mk VIII.

Doug

>>>>It seems that either the scissor liks are hidden by the wheel and the cover...or...they have some other system

All mk 20's have prominent links to the back

I have a big 6mb picture of a Mk 8 if you want a detail shot - just PM me with an address

(don"t know how to get it from Picassa to this site)

Steve

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Hi Doug,

One more thing worth noting about JF472 is that if you are using fündekals decals for your model they are probably incorrect regarding their depiction of the colours of the aircraft codes for JF472. On examination of various extant hi-res colour and black & white images of 145 Squadron Spitfire Mk. IX and Mk. VIII aircraft during 1943 that can be purchased as downloads from the Imperial War Museum. It is likely that JF472 wore blue codes with white surrounds as opposed to black ones with white surrounds.

Cheers,

Daniel.

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Hi Steve,

To link pictures on this forum you must first go into your Picasa Web Album and select "Link to this Photo" as shown below;

how_0001.jpg

Then select Image only (no link) and Select size of "Large";

how_0002.jpg

Then copy the Embed image tag;

how_0003.jpg

Then type these image tags into your forum post

how_0004.jpg

And then post your Forum Post with the image or images you wish to share;

8E00953.jpg

You could also post a direct link to the image by selecting the Insert Link in the forum editor next to the insert image button and then place the link tag you have copied from your Picasa album for the picture you are showing like this: Image Link Here in order to link to the larger image in your album.

I hope the above was helpful for you.

Cheers,

Daniel.

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Cheers,

Daniel.

Danny

Boy...that is a lot

The picture is of the Spit "Grey Nurse" at Temora I took in November

it is a big file and you can blow it right up on Picassa

It is in 100% left profile

...for anyone interested

in scaling etc.

I would need to gather a lot of brain cells to do the other proceedure ...sorry not right now. Only figured out how to send it to a mailbox at the mo

Will work on it when I learn how to get the skinny typewriter to talk to the funny TV better

Steve

PS

OK ..it is here https://picasaweb.google.com/10763626975977...019566171809154

the original is 6000kb (whatever that is)...but not on the picasa web, only my e-mail

It is an MK VIII and I cannot see torque links

Edited by TU-DOGGS

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91901 was not a link-type oleo, as we know it, at least according to the XIV manual; it was the reverse, since it had the links at the rear, and therefore invisible. (The manuals, at the time, are confusing, since they show 91901 has having no links at all.)

There were two mods "To introduce torsion link type oleo leg undercarriage": 832, for the IX, XII, XI & XIII, was not passed for use until September 1945, with 838, for the VII & VIII, on 19-6-44. Both were classified as "4B (whatever that was) or on replacement." No part nos are mentioned.

91986 had the links forward, which entailed a preparatory corner-cutting (literally) mod in the wheel well, which (as 1056) was issued as a leaflet only; together with 1057, which introduced the leg itself, Supermarine list it as being introduced 20-11-43, with the RAF showing both as 29-11-43

The whole oleo system is a complete mish-mash, with lists, published by the Air Ministry, bearing no resemblance to illustrations in the manuals, and, at times, Supermarine's drawings, however, it seems fairly safe to say that link-type legs only applied to the VII, and after, with only the XIV having them from the start, and, even then, temporarily with the links aft.

Edgar

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91901 was not a link-type oleo, as we know it, at least according to the XIV manual; it was the reverse, since it had the links at the rear, and therefore invisible. (The manuals, at the time, are confusing, since they show 91901 has having no links at all.)

There were two mods "To introduce torsion link type oleo leg undercarriage": 832, for the IX, XII, XI & XIII, was not passed for use until September 1945, with 838, for the VII & VIII, on 19-6-44. Both were classified as "4B (whatever that was) or on replacement." No part nos are mentioned.

91986 had the links forward, which entailed a preparatory corner-cutting (literally) mod in the wheel well, which (as 1056) was issued as a leaflet only; together with 1057, which introduced the leg itself, Supermarine list it as being introduced 20-11-43, with the RAF showing both as 29-11-43

The whole oleo system is a complete mish-mash, with lists, published by the Air Ministry, bearing no resemblance to illustrations in the manuals, and, at times, Supermarine's drawings, however, it seems fairly safe to say that link-type legs only applied to the VII, and after, with only the XIV having them from the start, and, even then, temporarily with the links aft.

Edgar

Hi Edgar,

All of the above is very interesting, thanks for posting further information on this.

Australian technical documents on Spitfire Mk. VIII aircraft describe their Mk. VIII aircraft as having Type 91901 Oleo Struts with Torque Links. For example a Minute describing the differences between Mk. Vc and Mk. VIII aircraft as promulgated by the RAAF Directorate of Technical Services dated 28 October 1943 states the following as quoted below;

Undercarriage

Struts are type 91901 with torque links instead of splined ram as on V.C No bronze bushes.

Undercarriage operation system same as V.C but leg locking pins are now steel instead of bronze which should be an improvement.

Main tyres are 7.50 x 10½" 1 K 13

Wheels are different type to V.C

Brakes are a different type to V.C

Brakes are a different size VIII 8-7/16 x 2-11/16"

V.C 9" x 2"

italics are mine

It is also worth noting that the above is based on the examination of one of the first Spitfire Mk. VIII aircraft as received in Australia.

A later RAAF Technical Order, Spitfire Instruction No. 23 promulgated during October of 1944 for example describe the following Oleo struts as being extant on Australian Spitfires;

Spitfire Mk. Vc Trop. Vickers Oleo Pneumatic Type 91244 and Type 91244/L (note. 91244/L were Link Type)

Spitfire LF Mk. VIIIc. Vickers Oleo Pneumatic Type 91945, Type 91901 and Type 91986

Spitfire HF Mk. VIIIc. Vickers Oleo Pneumatic Type 91986

There are also more primary source technical documents held in Australian Archives that have been promulgated by both British and Australian authors that further describe and document the following Types 91244/L, 91901, and 91986 Oleo Struts as "Link Types" "Torque Types" & "Torsion Types" interchangeably while also noting that the Type 91244 Oleo Strut for example is only a Splined Ram Type.

Cheers,

Daniel.

P.S.

Here is some further gen that is related to the information that Edgar has shared.

A document promulgated by No. 2 Aircraft Depot RAAF in response to letters dated 1 March and 9 September 1943 respectively that describes differences between aircraft models received from overseas was received by the Air Board on 13 January 1944 it describes the following;

New type of undercarriage strut fitted (91986) this strut has torque link arms fitted to the front of the strut making necessary the repositioning of the brake hose on rear of spat.

It also has a single piece strut axle bracket, previous models having a double piece bracket.

italics are mine.

So as Edgar stated the Type 91901 oleo strut had the torque link arms on the back while Type 91986 had them on the front.

The question now is did the Type 91945 have torque link arms at all and if it did where were they located, front or back?

It should also be noted that JF472 still probably had Type 91901 oleo struts fitted with torque links (at the back) as other Australian JF serial Spitfire VIII aircraft had like for example JF621 that was received by 1 Aircraft Depot on 25 October 1943.

Edited by Daniel Cox

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Nice picture Steve,

I hope you had a good day I was there as well although I am there most days they fly since I live just down the road from Temora.

Today the Temora Mk. VIII today feature torque links on the forward side of the oleo struts which are the Type 91986 version which was also the type fitted to that airframe when delivered to Australia.

The Temora Spitfire VH-HET is a bit different to how it was when it was received by No. 2 Aircraft Depot at Richmond, New South Wales during 24 June 1945 as a Vickers-Supermarine HF Mk. VIIIc MV239 (A58-758).

One significant difference is this aircraft does not use a Merlin 70 engine for its motive power. Today it uses a Packard built V1650-7 (think more along the lines of the Merlin 266 of Mk. XVI fame) to turn its german made propellor blades. As I understand it the original Merlin 70 that was fitted to A58-758 when delivered to Australia, is still extant where Dannielle Lang gets to play.

Cheers,

Daniel.

Edited by Daniel Cox

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This is one of the worrying items; as 91901, on the VIII, it might well be listed as having links, but I can't find them on any drawing:-

35150SHT5HUCOleo.jpg

This appears to be its replacement, but not until the end of 1943 (1945? legibility is awful):-

35150sht33Boleo.jpg

361-- part nos refer to the Mk.IX, of course, these, being 351--, refer to the VII, but I doubt that there's any real difference.

Edgar

Edited by Edgar

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I didn't realize I was opening a can of worms. :huh: From the drawing Edgar posted, and since JF472 was a very early Mk VIII, I am going to take the easy way out and assume no torque links, front or back. Daniel, I am using the fundekals, but the codes do appear to me to be very dark blue, not black. I may overpaint them a lighter blue anyway.

Thanks to everyone for this very interesting chain of posts.

Doug

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Seems smart. it is probably easier to leave them off now, and add them later if evidence subsequently turns up, than to fit them now and have to remove them later.

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Hi Edgar,

I see what you mean, thanks for posting those two documents, over the next few weeks I'll look through some more Mk. VIII documents as well as examine some extant unrestored Mk. VIII oleo struts to see if I can find anything else of interest.

Hi Doug,

It's always a can of worms (well not always, sometimes often though) I'm waiting on a hi-res picture (will get it within a week) of a very early Mk. VIII in Italy during November of 1943 that might reveal the area in question. As to fündekals I have only seen their illustration from the fündekals website which looked black, anyway regardless I'm sure your efforts will be rewarding. What kit are you working on that will use those decals?

Cheers,

Daniel.

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Hi Doug,

It's always a can of worms (well not always, sometimes often though) I'm waiting on a hi-res picture (will get it within a week) of a very early Mk. VIII in Italy during November of 1943 that might reveal the area in question. As to fündekals I have only seen their illustration from the fündekals website which looked black, anyway regardless I'm sure your efforts will be rewarding. What kit are you working on that will use those decals?

Cheers,

Daniel.

Hi Daniel,

I agree that the fundekals codes do look black on their website, but they are dark blue (at least to my eyes!). I am starting to build the 1/32 Tamiya Mk VIII. I like the fact that JR472 is in the desert scheme and has the extended wingtips. I noticed fundekals made a mistake in claiming that it did not have the later horn balances on the elevators while the photos clearly show that it did. I always like to see photos of the aircraft I model in order to make them as accurate as possible.

Regards,

Doug

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Hi Doug,

Very nice! I haven't seen the Tamiya Mk. VIII kit in person but since I have the Mk. IX kit I am aware of how nice a kit it is. As to illustrations of aircraft though I do like them I am loathe to trust them in the absence of photographs, I wouldn't mind seeing the end result of your efforts when you get it done.

Cheers,

Daniel.

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Hi All,

Back to the Type 91901 Oleo Struts, it is clear that Type 91901 struts as fitted to Spitfire Mk. VIII aircraft received by Australia from 25 October 1943 (the date of the first ones to arrive) featured Torque/Torsion Links as identified in a comprehensive investigation by the RAAF Directorate of Technical Services in order to compare the differences between the current in-service Mk. Vc type and the brand new off the boat Mk. VIII.

"Struts are type 91901 with torque links instead of splined ram as on V.C No bronze bushes." It is highly doubtful that the Directorate of Technical Services was imagining these differences nor making it up for their own amusement, or attempting to create bemusement amongst modellers almost 69 years later regarding this detail.

In fact as a credible source of information regarding this feature a report that was dated the 28th of October 1943 just 3 days after the first Spitfire Mk. VIII's had arrived. That was produced following a detailed examination of a newly delivered and at that time unmodified by the RAAF actual real Spitfire Mk. VIII fitted with Type 91901 Oleo Struts. Is more credible than a drawing even if from the manufacturer, simply because the actual object is a more reliable document in this instance than a drawing of indeterminate variation.

Again to further illustrate the point that the Australian documentation details comprehensively what they actually received as opposed to what they supposedly received as described in drawings or recorded in log books for example, These documents are perhaps a better measure of the equipment delivered and their condition at the time on the available evidence.

As shown below what one expects to have occurred is not always what occurred, quoted from a 7 June 1943 memorandum from No. 1 Aircraft Park a unit that erected Spitfires upon arrival in Australia;

(d) GUN HEATERS: Two aircraft, E.F. 545 and E.F 546 are found to

have incorporated a modification similar to Spitfire Order No. 4. In

these aircraft, however, the hot air, instead of being allowed merely

to flow out laterally through two holes in the blanking off extension,

as in Spitfire Order No.4, is instead conducted via pipes laterally

and directed against the breach blocks of the guns.

(e) MOD. 523. Referring to Air Board signal T.342 5/9. It is observed

that although the original log books of all aircraft received by this

unit show Mod.523 as embodied, the striker piercing pins of aircraft

JG.728, EF.543, EF.646 EE.671, EE.677, EE.675, were found not to be

Drilled in accordance with the signal referred to, but were provided

With a shallow flute to provide gas escape. As this flute did not

appear a satisfactory device, and as the presence of the flute made, it

difficult to drill the hole down the axis of the pin, new pins were

manufactured for the aircraft.

The above notation of deviations from mods and or standards is a rather common theme in Australian material on the Spitfire as delivered from England.

Returning to the torque/torsion link oleo struts discussion I reiterate the British Air Ministry Postagram dated on the 7th of April 1943, Reference S. 84993/II/S.M.8 and quote in part further from it as shown below;

Spitfire and Seafire (All Marks) – Servicing of

Undercarriage Oleo Struts Special Instruction S.M./194.

Further to Special Instruction SM/160 issued under Air Minstry postagram S.84993/S.M.8. dated 12/Jan./43, the quality of oil blown out (para.3 (vii)) will vary with the different types of oleo struts fitted as detailed hereunder.

0 Type 91244/L is type 91244 converted to torsion link type for fitment in embodiment of Spitfire Mod. 838 (VII & VIII), Mod. 832 (VC, IX, XII, XIII) and Seafire Mod. 110.

• Type 91986 is the new design production torsion link type for the above modifications.

2. The type of oleo strut fitted may be identified by the Vickers part number borne on the instruction plate on the strut.

The British Air Ministry also seemed to believe that torque/torsion links were available and or in use on some Mk. V and later type Spitfires during 1943 and beyond.

It is also worth noting that this Postagram was distributed to the following;

Army Co-Operation, Coastal, Fighter, Flying Training, Maintenance Commands, Middle East, West Africa, India, Iraq, Malta, N.W. Africa, Mediterranean Commands. (1 copy each Air and Sea Mail).

41, 43, 44 Groups.

Handling Squadron, Hullavington.

Copies to:- S.M.1 (a) (1)

A.L.O. R.A.A.F. (2)

R.F.L.7. (2)

R.T.P.14. (1)

R.T.P.16. (1)

R.M.4. (1)

E.23. (1)

R.D.A.Defects (30)

So in summary the absence of a found drawing showing torque/torsion links is not proof of the absence of the same especially when noted as being present in highly relevant primary source documents that specially notes the appearance of those links on the actual oleo struts on a Spitfire Mk. VIII during October of 1943.

On the available primary source documents that both record the observation of the presence of torque/torsion links during October 1943 and list the modification and production of torque/torsion link oleo struts during April of 1943 it is fair to say that from 1943 some Spitfire V aircraft and later types featured Link Type Oleo Struts.

It is also fair to say that the Type 91901 Oleo Struts featured torque/torsion links on the earliest Mk. VIII Spitfires delivered to the RAAF in Australia during October of 1943. Unless of course the RAAF Directorate of Technical Services Flight Lieutenant was hallucinating when he described the following "Struts are type 91901 with torque links instead of splined ram as on V.C No bronze bushes."

Hopefully I will be able to dig up some pictures and or artefacts of the Type 91901 torque links over the next few weeks till then….

Cheers,

Daniel.

All Italics are mine.

Limited Bibliography

National Archives of Australia (Mtchell, ACT)

Series No: A705

9/41/74: Spitfire Aircraft General Technical File

9/53/1/Part 1: Directorate of Technical Services - Spitfire Aircraft – General Defect File

9/53/27: Directorate of Technical Services - Spitfire Aircraft – Performance comparison – tropical and non-tropical types

9/53/74: Directorate of Technical Services - Spitfire Mark VIII – General Technical File

9/53/102: Directorate of Equipment & Administration – Items necessary to ensure operational completeness – Spitfire aircraft

150/4/5438: Publication of Technical Order Spitfire Instruction No 19 “Undercarriage Operation and Maintenance

Series No: A10297

Block 370: Aircraft Status Cards – Spitfire A58-300 to A58-399

Block 371: Aircraft Status Cards – Spitfire A58-400 to A58-499

Block 372: Aircraft Status Cards – Spitfire A58-500 to A58-550

Block 373: Aircraft Status Cards – Spitfire A58-600 to A58-699

Block 374: Aircraft Status Cards – Spitfire A58-700 to A58-758

Series No: A11093

452/A58/Part 1: RAAF Command Headquarters – Spitfire Aircraft – A58

452/A58/Part 2: RAAF Command Headquarters – Spitfire Aircraft – A58

Series No: A11098

241/7/6/ENG: RAAF Command Advanced Headquarters – Spitfire Aircraft A58

Books

Humphreys, Robert. The Supermarine Spitfire, Part 1: Merlin Powered, SAM, Bedford, 2000.

Humphreys, Robert. The Supermarine Spitfire, Part 2: Griffon-Powered, SAM, Bedford, 2001.

Kořán, František. Danda, Vladimír. Martínek, Josef. Khol, Miroslav. Spitfire LF.Mk.IX in detail, WWP, Prague, 2002.

Morgan, Eric. Shacklady, Edward. Spitfire The History, Key, Horsell, New Milton, 1999.

Monforton, Paul. H. Spitfire Mk. IX & XVI: Engineered, Monforton, Ottawa, 2007.

Moss, Graham. McKee, Barry. Spitfires and Polished Metal, Restoring the Classic Fighter, Airlife, Shrewsbury, 1999.

Nohara, S., Ohasato, H. Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I-V: Aero Detail 8, Dainippon,

Tokyo, 1993.

Ohasato, H., Yamada, Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire Mk.VI-XVI: Aero Detail 27, Dainippon,

Tokyo 2000.

Price, Alfred. Dr. Late Marque, Spitfire Aces 1942-45, Osprey Aircraft of the Aces 5, Osprey, London, 1995.

Scutts, Jerry. Spitfire in Action, Aircraft No. 39 Squadron/Signal, Carrollton, 1980.

Wilson, Stewart. The Spitfire, Mustang and Kittyhawk in Australian Service, Aerospace, circa 1989.

Edited by Daniel Cox

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It is also fair to say that the Type 91901 Oleo Struts featured torque/torsion links on the earliest Spitfires delivered to the RAAF in Australia during October of 1943.

earliest Spitfire VIIIs, you mean?

Good work, Daniel.

bob

Edited by gingerbob

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earliest Spitfire VIIIs, you mean?

Good work, Daniel.

bob

Hi Bob,

Yes I do, thanks for catching that I have now fixed it, I certainly don't make the best of editors.

Cheers,

Daniel.

Edited by Daniel Cox

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Hi Doug,

I hope this information may be of use, anyway following examination of 9 hi-res images showing 12 early Spitfire Mk. VIII aircraft (JF serial range) in Italy taken between July 1943 and January 1944. I cannot sight torque links on the oleo struts of the JF serial Mk. VIII Spitfires.

0.jpg

As usual a larger 1800x1200 pixel version of the image above can be found here.

Cheers,

Daniel.

Edited by Daniel Cox

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I recall being told by a former RAF groundcrew (retired in the late 50's), that the torque links compensated for the additional abuse of operating off paved runways and only came into use late in the war as the Allies increaingly found themselves operating less from grass and more from prepared airfields.

Scott

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Hi, I am new to this site and have a question about Spitfires. I am building a model of a Mk VIII serialed JK472 and am wondering whether it had the torque links fitted to the main gear legs.

Thanks,

Doug

Doug -

Having looked at THOUSANDS of Spitfire pictures I would say that any Spit from 1943 would NOT have the oleo links. I only see them in pics from early 1945 onward.

Would love to see a picture of your model of JF472. Are you using our decals?

Jonathan @ fundekals.com

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