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Kwakou61

Airfix Sunderland

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Amazing work here on a wonderful subject!

Have a look at the "Airfix IL-2 the hard way" thread for a quick and easy vac former. I knocked mine up in about 10 minutes and it would help you sort out those canopies.

Regards,

Adrian

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Ron you are right of course about the reducing size of the moulding but how about after pulling through, gripping the "skirt" with a hand and easing it in towards the stick before it gets too cool? I find I have a second or two to use this way before the cooling stops the shrinking

Another idea

Use the same mould and stick but at a wide approach angle so it stretches above and below leaving the back of the turret to be "sorted out" later. As that is opaque you may be able to make a diferent back but still use your present mould to get the turret

So pull across the bulge

I'm off out to our club now but I think I will give this a tryout later

It's a technique I have used before when working on the oblique, you don't always need a direct down pull

Good luck, I love this beautiful 'boat

bill

Edited by perdu

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Okay, it worked...kind of..

Bill, I gave it another try with your suggestion in mind and by miracle it worked!

This time I put on my leather gloves and inmidiately after heating up gave the skirt a good pull, yes indeed..

sunderland15.jpg

sunderland16.jpg

There is only one slight problem..

When measuring the plastic it appeared to have a thickness of only 1/10 mm. It is useless.

I can't even pick it up without barely crushing it. It may be in scale but it is way too fragile to do anything with it, let alone working it into a turret.

But I now know that with a little perseverance it must be possible. I have to call it a day now but I hope to be back soon with a good pair of turrets.

Thanks all for the help and encouragement. Much appreciated!

Kindest regards,

Ron

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Try giving the turret a couple of coats of Klear. That can add a considerable amount of rigidity to a part.

Martin

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or thicker acetate sheet can work too

I'm glad shrinking worked for you, looks rather nicely shaped ;)

Dont forget you only want to reduce the skirt size rather than make the moulding any thinner so squeeze rather than pull down further

To be honest I would usually make about three when I do these jobs just so I can cover all the bases

I love what you have done and endorse Martin's advice, Klear can add a decent amount of rigidity without making the thickness too "brutal"

Seeing how well you have done I shall desist from messing about this evening

:)

b

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Thanks to you guy's help I finally managed to get me some great turrets!

Martin's suggestion to Klear coat the thin front turret indeed gave more rigidity to it. But it was not enough unfortunately. To work on the parts I need to be able to exert some pressure to it and it didn't survive that. But I'm sure that in many cases this very well might do the trick.

Then a different material was used which was the solution for me. For the front turret a harder and thicker (thanks Bill) plastic from an old cosmetics box was used this time and that was an immediate succes! This material is less tough and 'rubberish' than the blister package material used previously and is more willing to 'flow' around the mould. I think it is called acrylate and looks more like the material that is used for standard clear kit parts.

The tail turret came out without much problems with the blister package material, probably because it is somewhat larger. So I ended up with two good clear parts for further modelling.

I found that this technique of making clear parts requires some practice, but then opens up a whole new world of possibilities!

sunderland17.jpg

In the meantime the turrets and cockpit hood were fitted with framing strips so that apart from some details the outsides are finished.

sunderland18.jpg

Now some interiors will be made and then these turrets should be ready for fitting. I'm still contemplating whether the top turret will be pull moulded as well or the kit parts will be used. Whichever is the least work and best result.

More later.

greetings,

Ron

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Thanks guys!

To be honest, I'm quite satisfied myself too, although when looking at my own picture and comparing it with pictures of real Sunderlands some frame strips appear a little too thick.

Oh well..

The method of making them is as follows;

On the picture a role of black self adhesive book cellophane can be seen. It can be painted in the colour of your choice, in my case white and grey. The advantage of using black cellophane is that the insides of the frame will be black too which gives in my opinion the most realistic look. Then the material can be cut into thin strips and sticked on the clear part. Once a strip is placed correctly (you can do multiple attempts as the glue leaves no residue) the overlays can be carefully trimmed with a razorblade. This takes a good pair of glasses and patience. Then a little touch up with paint finishes the job. When done dip the whole thing in klear (not too long otherwise the strips will come off) and presto!

I think the available specific modelling materials will work in the same way but I use this stuff for years already and I have no urge to try something else at this time as it works good enough for me.

It is really not difficult, but it does take a little practice to get the 'feel' of the material. It cuts well and it is very flexible.

sunderland19.jpg

cheers!

ron

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Wel Ron, didnt that work nicely then :)

I never use a kit canopy any more, bespoke home made are always better looking

And that goes for yours in spades :thumbsup:

(now you have realised I would make the upper turret that way too, but hey, no pressure ;) )

I'm glad the thicker acetate tip worked for you, that is beautiful work on the framing.

That is a tip I have picked up from you, ta.

b

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(now you have realised I would make the upper turret that way too, but hey, no pressure ;) )

I feel your pressure Bill. Thanks for making the decision for me and I promise I won't blame you if it fails..

cheers

ron

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That's great Ron. Very similar to the Solar trim that I used on the Stirling.

I need to do more experimenting with home mate turrets, yours look the dogs danglies :)

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That's great Ron. Very similar to the Solar trim that I used on the Stirling.

I need to do more experimenting with home mate turrets, yours look the dogs danglies :)

Thank you Neil!

I don't know what dogs danglies are. I assume something wonderful..

cheers,

ron

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