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May I submit another Albatros ?


rotaliscia
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Hi all,

after considering lost my kit somewhere between Wellington NZ and Rome (thanks to Mr.Dave Johnson for the help in finding it!), I'm pleased to show you some progress.

This is the first biplane of my 30 years modeling career, and start with such a jewel of kit is the best way to win the fear (...even if I should wait to complete the model !).

I don't know yet what the final livery of the airplane will be, since I'm equally tempted by a couple of options in the decal sheet.

But, since I really like the Jasta5 airplanes, I would like to realize a silver-red-green aircraft not among the kit options (Lt. Lehmann's one, for the expertens).

( @ Wingnut Wings: a new decal sheet for the Jasta5's would be reaaaaaally welcome! )

As stated elsewhere, I swore to myself to not order another Albatros before having installed -at least- the upper wing, as the proof to be capable to build biplanes.

But I failed.

This kit is too good to resist and my next Albatros should be somewhere above the Indian ocean, right now!

Anyway, this is the status of works as today.

Hope you like it. Any suggestion will be really apreciated.

Paolo

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Edited by rotaliscia
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Lovely build so far Paolo, if you are looking for Jasta 5 decals then you should contact Rowan Broadbent (Pheon Models), he does a very impressive sheet of 1/32 Jasta 5 decals.

This was his special edition of Rumeys Devil.

dev31.jpg

Cheers

Pete.

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Very nice Paulo, we never tire of Albatri on this forum!

Keep posing on your progress, and particularly on how well the fuselage goes together, I belive it can be a tight fit.

Cheers

John

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Fuselage joined, glue is still setting.

(John, looks a good fitting; correctly tight, not too much; photos soon)

A quick update, in less than half an hour of painting

Lesson learned: on the next, paint all pieces BEFORE to use the glue! :unsure:

In the photo the green appears darker than real. Maybe too close.

The grey-green is Tamiya XF-76. Streaks and dirt are oil paints.

Take care you all

Paolo

ps: someone can explain me why Albatroses are often called Albatri or Albatrii ??

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ps: someone can explain me why Albatroses are often called Albatri or Albatrii ??

Hi Paolo;

It's a funny British way of saying a lot of Albatroses, it's not exactly correct, it's something that has just happened with WWI modellers.

Cheers

Pete

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ps: someone can explain me why Albatroses are often called Albatri or Albatrii ??

Hi Paulo,

In English we are using it as the plural form of the word. 1 Albatros, 2 Alabatri.

Its not strictly correct but we WW1 guys know what we mean!

Cheers,

John

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  • 1 month later...

Surely the correct plural should be based on German usage? Albatross is actually derived from the Portuguese word for gannet and the plural is albatrosses. But Albatros (one S) is a German version, so the plural ought to be something like Albatrosen.

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Surely the correct plural should be based on German usage? Albatross is actually derived from the Portuguese word for gannet and the plural is albatrosses. But Albatros (one S) is a German version, so the plural ought to be something like Albatrosen.

Strictly speaking the German plural of Albatros is Albatrosse.

Many RFC officer pilots were very recently ex Public Schoolboys and in those days the learning of Latin was de rigeur (or should that be sine qua non?) at such schools. Part of the Public School argot involved the "latinification" of normal English words or the use of Latin words as direct replacements for the English; Mater and Pater for Mother and Father, for instance. In addition, your "average" RFC pilot would hardly be likely to dignify the "Hun" by correct application of German grammar - quite the opposite, in fact. Hence the light-hearted application of Latin language norms to give the plural of Albatros as Albatri - also considerably easier on the ear than "albatrosses". I suspect that it was first coined in 56 Squadron - possibly by Arthur Rhys-Davids who was himself a Classics Scholar and Old Etonian (in fact he had been Captain of School, or "Head Boy" before he left in 1916 to join the RFC).

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Strictly speaking the German plural of Albatros is Albatrosse.

Many RFC officer pilots were very recently ex Public Schoolboys and in those days the learning of Latin was de rigeur (or should that be sine qua non?) at such schools. Part of the Public School argot involved the "latinification" of normal English words or the use of Latin words as direct replacements for the English; Mater and Pater for Mother and Father, for instance. In addition, your "average" RFC pilot would hardly be likely to dignify the "Hun" by correct application of German grammar - quite the opposite, in fact. Hence the light-hearted application of Latin language norms to give the plural of Albatros as Albatri - also considerably easier on the ear than "albatrosses". I suspect that it was first coined in 56 Squadron - possibly by Arthur Rhys-Davids who was himself a Classics Scholar and Old Etonian (in fact he had been Captain of School, or "Head Boy" before he left in 1916 to join the RFC).

I'll give you that one - though I wasn't far off for someone who dunt speak German ... !

Public schoolboys and Latin, then. And did none of them spot that Albatros has a Greek-style ending? Would the plural then be Albatroi?

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I'll give you that one - though I wasn't far off for someone who dunt speak German ... !

Public schoolboys and Latin, then. And did none of them spot that Albatros has a Greek-style ending? Would the plural then be Albatroi?

Oh I don't think they'd have made such an assumption about the average ex-pupil's knowledge of Ancient Greek - that would have been just elitist....... and beyond the understanding of the hoi polloi!!

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Having disposed of the Greek and Latin (and “os” is the ending of Greek singular male nouns), let’s get back to present usage.

The German form does not sit easily in English pronunciation, but Albatrosses is use of an English plural upon a foreign word and also sounds terrible.

Might I suggest that for English speaking modellers the most elegant plural available is, simply, Albatros. After all, sheep is both singular and plural.

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