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Pip

Advice please after my 2nd Build

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Dear All,

Please could you give me some constructive comments on my 2nd attempt....really new to this hobby and I am really enjoying it but not getting the brilliant finishes all you guys get. Problems along the way included canopy painting and problems with decals (silvering I think you call it, they looked a little better after a coat of Klear?) and uneven paint lines. Still learning my airbrush techniques.

Any advice would be really helpfull.

Thanks

Pip

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Looks pretty good to me! I don't airbrush so I can't help out with that but regarding the decals, I always put some klear on the model first where the decal will be placed and then lay the decal over the top and then when the klear dries it sort of ''pulls'' the decal into place and conforms well to the lines etc.

Hope this helps.

Cy

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Firstly a very good effort for your second build and it sounds like you've already picked up on a couple of points.

I always find that the easiest way to mask the canopy is to edge the area to be masked with a thin strip of tape and then use tissue and a masking fluid such as Micro Mask to mask the rest of the canopy.

A couple of minor observations on the build, it looks like the edges of some of the main rotor blades haven't been painted and perhaps the front panel of the sand box air filter could have benefited from a touch of filler.

I'm assuming it's the way the kit has been manufactured, on the Sea King, the radome is actually attached to a fixed panel mounted in the bottom left hand corner of the cabin door and there is cut out in the door that fits around it. The radome would not move when the door is opened as you've shown it.

Hope this helps.

Richard

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not too much wrong there that a bit of practice doesnt help with

do you have micromesh?

this help with 'smoothing' out paintwork, it comes either in pads or cloth - you start with the heaviest grade and use it like sandpaper, progressing to the finest grade - the results are amazing.

it works on paint and clear plastic, as in windows on a model...

so for instance, with your sea king; to make the winodws fit a little better you might fill and sand any gaps, or sand the plastic down a bit so they fit right, but obvioulsy this would leave the clear plastic covered innsanding marks...

after micro-meshing it, the plastic will be as clear as it was when new.

spraying is really down to practice, holding the gun at the right distance, etc from the model....try practicing on scrap plastic, also very useful if using spraycans.

if your brushing, shake the tin then stir the contents until they scream for mercy and your hand and arm are ready to drop off, use thin coats and several of them - dont try to apply paint in one go. Also leave a load of time in between coats to let it dry properly - it might feel dry to touch but underneath the top layer it may still be damp.

hth

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If you managed that on your second build then you should be seriously pleased with yourself.

The decal silvering is best dealt with by putting on the gloss coat before the decals.

If it was me then I'd probably have toned the gloss right down afterwards - satin, leaning almost towards full matt. But that's probably a matter of taste for this colour scheme.

My own favourite for masking straight lines and canopy framing - others will have their own - is a plain ceramic tile (the kind you tile a bathroom with, shiny, flat, no pattern on it), a steel rule, and a sharp blade.

Then lay a length of Tamiya masking tape on the tile.

You might as well buy the widest tape they have.

Then I just cut thin strips, using the steel rule as a guide. For masking something more or less straight then the strips can be quite wide, but if you cut them nice and narrow then they will follow curves too.

Once you have the outline sorted then fill in, either using a masking fluid or even pieces of surplus tape left over after you cut your strips.

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not too much wrong there that a bit of practice doesnt help with

do you have micromesh?

this help with 'smoothing' out paintwork, it comes either in pads or cloth - you start with the heaviest grade and use it like sandpaper, progressing to the finest grade - the results are amazing.

it works on paint and clear plastic, as in windows on a model...

so for instance, with your sea king; to make the winodws fit a little better you might fill and sand any gaps, or sand the plastic down a bit so they fit right, but obvioulsy this would leave the clear plastic covered innsanding marks...

after micro-meshing it, the plastic will be as clear as it was when new.

spraying is really down to practice, holding the gun at the right distance, etc from the model....try practicing on scrap plastic, also very useful if using spraycans.

if your brushing, shake the tin then stir the contents until they scream for mercy and your hand and arm are ready to drop off, use thin coats and several of them - dont try to apply paint in one go. Also leave a load of time in between coats to let it dry properly - it might feel dry to touch but underneath the top layer it may still be damp.

hth

Thanks for your comments... have been looking at Micromesh on that internet bidding site and will get some, thanks for you advice & Happy New Year :-)

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If you managed that on your second build then you should be seriously pleased with yourself.

The decal silvering is best dealt with by putting on the gloss coat before the decals.

If it was me then I'd probably have toned the gloss right down afterwards - satin, leaning almost towards full matt. But that's probably a matter of taste for this colour scheme.

My own favourite for masking straight lines and canopy framing - others will have their own - is a plain ceramic tile (the kind you tile a bathroom with, shiny, flat, no pattern on it), a steel rule, and a sharp blade.

Then lay a length of Tamiya masking tape on the tile.

You might as well buy the widest tape they have.

Then I just cut thin strips, using the steel rule as a guide. For masking something more or less straight then the strips can be quite wide, but if you cut them nice and narrow then they will follow curves too.

Once you have the outline sorted then fill in, either using a masking fluid or even pieces of surplus tape left over after you cut your strips.

Thanks for that great advice for canopy painting, not sure the wife will be happy when she discovers that there is a tile missing in the shower...only joking. I will try the thin strips and I have bought some Maskol recently, thanks again and Happy New Year :-)

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not sure the wife will be happy when she discovers that there is a tile missing in the shower...only joking.

Stuff "mysteriously" disappearing into the modelmaking toolbox is a time-honoured tradition. I'd suggest acquiring from a DIY shop in this case though.

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I have to agree with all that's been said - if that's only your second go, I can't wait to see what's yet to come!

Same again with the decals. If you could imagine trying to place a window sticker on frosted glass, then that's similar to putting a decal on a matt or even satin finish. A coat of Johnson's Klear (which is hard to get under that name, I believe it's now called 'Future') makes a more glass-like surface and therefore, less air gets trapped under the decal which is where your silvering comes in. However, a new product that's not long on the market from a company called Alclad, is their Aqua Gloss which goes on like a treat and will be easily available. Great for dipping canopies to, to get that crytal clear look!

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Hi Pip:

Congratulations !!

If this one is your second model, you're on the right path and hope to watch all the other things to come here from your productions, all the advices the precedent colleagues gave are the finest and even tough the model finish is wonderful, the only thing I could advice is if you have the Airbrush manual, follow the instructions for mixing paint and solvent as they advice but adjust to your climate, paint and need conditions, and try practice, and practice and practice, is the only way to do a perfect job in all you could do. Thank you for sharing.

Happy New Year to you, yours and everyone here!!!

Luis Alfonso

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Cracking second model, can't wait to see future builds. I also brush paint so can't assist with Airbrushing. I usually coat my canopy parts in Johnsons Klear and then use Cyano glue (which I get from my local plastics suppier, i.e. replacement windows, cladding, soffets etc as a lot cheaper than modelling suppliers), to fix in place. I then paint the interior colour by brush. I try to stay on the right frame lines however do get some on the glass, however once dry, i gently rub a cocktail stick along the glass side of the frame line and this rubs off the paint that I want to remove, I find this works a treat. Obviously then repeat with the final exterior colour(s). Saves a bit of time this way.

Good luck with your builds

All the best

Chris

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Hi Pip:

Congratulations !!

If this one is your second model, you're on the right path and hope to watch all the other things to come here from your productions, all the advices the precedent colleagues gave are the finest and even tough the model finish is wonderful, the only thing I could advice is if you have the Airbrush manual, follow the instructions for mixing paint and solvent as they advice but adjust to your climate, paint and need conditions, and try practice, and practice and practice, is the only way to do a perfect job in all you could do. Thank you for sharing.

Happy New Year to you, yours and everyone here!!!

Luis Alfonso

Thank you for your comments of encouragement Luis....... :-)

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Cracking second model, can't wait to see future builds. I also brush paint so can't assist with Airbrushing. I usually coat my canopy parts in Johnsons Klear and then use Cyano glue (which I get from my local plastics suppier, i.e. replacement windows, cladding, soffets etc as a lot cheaper than modelling suppliers), to fix in place. I then paint the interior colour by brush. I try to stay on the right frame lines however do get some on the glass, however once dry, i gently rub a cocktail stick along the glass side of the frame line and this rubs off the paint that I want to remove, I find this works a treat. Obviously then repeat with the final exterior colour(s). Saves a bit of time this way.

Good luck with your builds

All the best

Chris

Your comments are really great and now its time for you all to decide which build I do next..... Revell RAH-66 COMANCHE or Airfix BOEING AH-64 Longbow Apache, will do my best but pre-build comments would be fab.

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Nice job, and a few constructive comments.

In regards the canopy masking, I use high quality Tamiya tape and get a new Xacto knife blade to cut the tape out as I follow the panel line of the canopy. You have a straight edge on the tape that you can line up on one of the edges and you will only have to cut one one or two sides.

Your airbrushing looks a little heavy. Can I suggest you thin your paint right down to a milk like consistency, and if you are not using acrylics, switch to them asap. Utilise lacquer thinners (these should be available at any hardware store) and you should have a far more even surface appearance.

And as for not getting the results many here get, do not worry, it takes many years of practice and patience to build up your skill sets. So long as you see you are improving with each and every build then you are improving and getting better. And remember, it's a hobby, so ENJOY it. But I think you are already.

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Very nice build especially for your second attempt! You'll be getting even better results if you follow the good advice already given here, and I look forward to seeing the results

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A grand effort...especially considering it's only your second attempt.

Follow the advice here and you'll come on leaps and bounds.

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