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Wow, you work fast Nige. They both look very good and you seem to have everything aligned.

How about doing one in a 'what if' Pan AM livery?

Cheers,

John

I have my pan am decals for mine but that's for the what if gb

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Here's an update on how things are going.

Thanks for all your interest in this project.

Here we see the SFF clipped together, eith the long one in the background.

pair.jpg

And the SFF on his own.

sff2.jpg

from behind..

sff1.jpg

I think i need to move the wing root back on the SFF? what says you??

Nige

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I think i need to move the wing root back on the SFF? what says you??

Nige

No Nige, keep it where it is but only use 2 engines out of the 4???

But looking very good so far buddy, you can still build an pan am bird! I've got mine already and I'm also waiting for my bmi and AA Decals for other builds

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No Nige, keep it where it is but only use 2 engines out of the 4???

I had thought of that Chris, but i think I'll keep it as a four engined SFF, as it could be used in those Airports around the world that need a very steep approach and departure angle, but still carry at least 350 Passengers ???

Of course, I don't really know what I'm talking about............

I do quite fancy doing a 747 SP now though????

Chris, as britmodellers officianado on the A380, can you tell me if it's possible to fit the landing gear after the mainframe is built? i would like to fit all the U/C bays, but fit the U/C last?? I've just realised, I haven't even looked at the instructions for this kit!!

Nige

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4 engines it is then lol, as for the undercarriage...... NO ( it's a pig )

OK Chris, I'll take that as a challenge!!

I'll try and design a system whereby the U/C can be fitted last!!

Of course, I'll document it, if I can make it work.

Nige

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OK Chris, I'll take that as a challenge!!

I'll try and design a system whereby the U/C can be fitted last!!

Of course, I'll document it, if I can make it work.

Nige

Well I can't wait for this I still have 15 in the stash lol

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Well I can't wait for this I still have 15 in the stash lol

How many?????????????????????????????

I've been really busy tonight.

Here you go, all done...

900-beluga-400.jpg

I've put my newly purchased Beluga in between to show just how big this thing is!!

900-beluga-4001.jpg

Thanks for stopping by, hope you're having as much fun as I am?

Nige

Edited by nigelr32
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Watching this one closely; an A380-900 is on my to do list, so it will be interesting to compare Cuprar's and your methods.

Tom

Following your comment Tom, I thought I'd give a description of what I've done, now that I know it works!!

I am not well versed in the art of 144th scale airliners, but am a keen modeller.

CupraR's way of doing this has the immediate benefit of only needing one kit, whereas with my method you need two kits. This didn't bother me too much, as these kits cost about the same as a photo etch set for a 32nd scale cockpit, (my usual kits). the benefit in doing it my way is that you can have clear windows, having said that, the windows are a complete pig to get right, especially at the rear end of the fuselage.

There are certain tools required to do it my way. You'll need a scriber and a very thin razor saw. I use the one sold by Littlecars.com. I also found the block of steel with wet and dry wrapped around it very handy to make sure all the joining pieces could be sanded square.

tools.jpg

I used tape, placed very accurately around the cut lines, to mark where I was going to cut, then lightly scribed the cut line. This gives you a groove for the saw to ride in initially, and stop it from sliding across your model. I use the saw in a pulling action rather than a sawing action, basically using the saw to "scribe" right through the wall.

Once all the cuts are made, the sections are laid flat on the bench, and the steel block with wet n dry rubbed across the cut end to ensure everything is square.

You can see in the following pics where I made my cuts:-

First fuselage, cut to achieve long nose and tail sections.

Fuselage1cut1.jpg

Second fuselage, cut to achieve the longer centre section:-

Fuselage2cut.jpg

The upper front of the long centre section needs to be cut out to make room for the required number of windows, and get rid of the radius down toward the cockpit. Also note the slit, packed with 1mm card to pull down the curve upwards of the lower front area :-

PortFuselage1.jpg

A small section of the rear long centre section needs to be removed for the windows :-

PortFuselage2.jpg

And then two sections of the scrap centre section needs to be removed with the correct number of windows :-

PortFuselage.jpg

Some plastic card will be required in some sections to give the correct spacing for the windows, and retain the correct overall length on both halves. Once glued together, it should look like this :-

PortFuselage3.jpg

I've done this in two halves as it's easier, I feel, to keep everything straight, rather than work with an almighty "tube".

When I glued the Starboard sections together, i kept dry fitting with the port half, to ensure alignment and no nasty surprises!!

I hope this gives you the confidence to have a go yourself. It really is a satisfying feeling when it all works out!!

Nige

Edited by nigelr32
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fascinating.....this topic should be pinned as an A380 build tips post

mods????

the wing root faring on the little (!) one;

on the 747SP, Boeing had to make several changes to the basic design, including the root, so I'm wondering, from the aerodynamic point of view, if you should do the same.

This might also include making the fin taller to compensate for the shorter fuselage.....

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clear windows - use clearfix into each window hole then put a silver window frame decal over it

kevin, how do you get the clearfix to remain totally flat and level with the fuselage. whenever i've used it, it forms a "concave" section in the hole?? Could I perhaps apply a second layer once dry, then sand it back flat.

I also wonder, if you apply the clearfix after final painting, how you remove any excess around the edge that would form a lump under the frame decals?? I've seen your Swissair pic in the "First airliner" thread on here, and those windows look simply stunning!!

Please help.

I don't think this should be pinned. Theres some far more interesting work going on around here, way more interesting than my build.

Nige

Edited by nigelr32
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Actually, you made spectacular start. So your project could be pinned as well. For clear windows, you can use strips of clear decal paper for laser printers (level difference with varnish and polishing) and if necessary apply frames over them.

Happy modeling!

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use a second layer if you have to but otherwise, do one side at a time and leave it to try with the model upside down so the clearfix dries towards the outside rather than drying inwards

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use a second layer if you have to but otherwise, do one side at a time and leave it to try with the model upside down so the clearfix dries towards the outside rather than drying inwards

Thanks kev, I wonder if I could use clearfix, then if I get some windows concave, drop a spot of future into them?? I must do some trials to see if clearfix can be polished??

Anyway, back to reality..kind of. I've been working on the '900, and have made the fill in sections for the rear end..

Rearfuselagerepair.jpg

I've also polished the outsides of the fuselage halves, to see if they are all level. They are!!!

I was also thinking about the "see through" nature of the model, with clear windows, and thought how unrealistic it would look if you could see the starboard lower run of windows through the port upper run, or vise versa??

So, I've done this....

bulkheads.jpg

Now you can look through any area and pick out the different areas within the fuselage.

So, now it's on to those undercarriage mods to allow the legs to be fitted at the end of the project?? Obviously, I'll let you all know how I get on... I know Chris is keen to see what i do.

Thanks for stopping by.

Nige

Edited by nigelr32
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You guys are too kind.

Chris, I have sorted the nose gear, and will post pics later if I have time. I fancy a pint or two tonight, so depending on just how many I have, you may be in luck??

I would love to build this with someone, so yes, please both start your SFF and Long Boy!!!

Regards

Nige

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Well, here goes...

This is how I've made it possible to not have the undercarriage in the way during the build of my A380. This section covers the nose gear, I'll cover the main gear later.

For those not familiar with this kit, the nose gear bay comes in three parts, two sides and a roof. The undercarriage leg fits between the sidewalls, which is more lifelike than having it plug into a great big hole in the roof, but is weak, and means you have to assemble it before joining the fuse halves together.

Undercarriage-1.jpg

I wanted to strengthen the main leg, so started by drilling the bottom half through with a 0.5mm drill..

Undercarriage1-1.jpg

Then the top half

Undercarriage2-1.jpg

I then glued the upper and lower halves together, and drilled through, progressively up to 0.8mm.

Undercarriage3-1.jpg

Now it's time to fit the leg parts into the bay. I've pushed through a piece of 0.8mm brass rod to mark the bay roof, then the gear is removed.

Undercarriage4-1.jpg

Make sure you cut the brass rod too long, so that it can be trimmed to size later. The rod is pushed through the leg and bay roof here.

Undercarriage5-1.jpg

Now it's time to add some strength for the brass to securely fit into. This is 2mm square plastic. Make this 10mm long or you'll foul the bottom of the cockpit cabin. drill it approx 8mm deep with a 0.8 mm drill. Do not go right through.

Undercarriage6-1.jpg

Here we have some stiffening brackets to stiffen up the plastic rod.

Undercarriage7-1.jpg

And all fitted up. Now you can see why I used square rod. If you're thinking this is overkill, consider one thing. With brass rod supporting the leg, you can bend the leg to adjust it into position, both at the end of the build and in future. You don't want the brass to break free!!

Undercarriage8.jpg

Now it's time to refit the leg into the bay and isert the brass rod through the leg, and up through the roof until it stops. Give it a good firm push to ensure it has bottomed out. Trim the brass to length at the bottom of the leg.

Undercarriage10-2.jpg

Now it's decision time, you can pull the rod out, and fold the undercarriage up into the bay, or cut the pegs off the side of the main leg, so the whole leg can be removed and replaced as you wish. If you take the folding option, the gear could be taped up or held in position with Blu-Tac. If you take the second option, you will be able to pull the leg about to get it in the exact psition you want, right at the end of the build, or at your next show??

Undercarriage9-1.jpg

Personally, I'm gonna take the second otion. I know there is the inaccuracy of having the brass rod there, but painted in the same colour as the bay, it'll hardly notice. On the plus side, it is VERY strong!!! I will leave the A frame of the nose gear in the bay, unglued, so I can position it at the end.

I hope you all enjoy reading this. Please let me know if you want to see more of these "How I did it" posts, or do you find them boring?

Nige

Edited by nigelr32
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I hope you all enjoy reading this.

Please let me know if you want to see more of these "How I did it" posts,

or do you find them boring

yes

yes

no

as for the floors in the fuselage, your only a step away from opening doors and putting some detail inside

and I love the gear ideas....have you thought about making oleos so the leg extands slightly when not sitting on the gear?

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I hope you all enjoy reading this.

Please let me know if you want to see more of these "How I did it" posts,

or do you find them boring

yes

yes

no

as for the floors in the fuselage, your only a step away from opening doors and putting some detail inside

and I love the gear ideas....have you thought about making oleos so the leg extands slightly when not sitting on the gear?

Thanks Kevin,

I wont be having folding gear, so there's no need for any movement in the Oleo's?? My idea of having the nose gear fold, is so you can finish the model with the gear out of the way, then fold it down at the end of your build.

Nige

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I'm a detail freak - ignore me and if your lucky I might go away

unlikely but you never know.....

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